Program contact:

Niall Christie

History Coordinator
604.323.5832
nchristie@langara.ca

David Borys Instructor

Phone: PENDING
Office: B247d
Email: dborys@langara.ca

David Borys is a Canadian historian who examines the relationship between war, society and identity. He is currently working on his first book, titled Civilians at the Sharp End, examining the reconstruction and rehabilitation efforts of First Canadian Army Civil Affairs in the liberated areas of France, Belgium and the Netherlands during the Second World War. He has written for newspapers such as the Globe and Mail and Toronto Star as well as published in edited volumes and academic journals. He is also the writer and narrator for the podcast Cool Canadian HistoryFollow him on twitter.

Niall Christie Instructor

Phone: 604.323.5832
Office: B247b
Email: nchristie@langara.ca

Niall Christie received his PhD in Islamic history from the University of St Andrews in 2000. He now teaches courses on the the history of Europe and the Muslim world at Langara. He conducts research on the crusading period, focusing especially on the Muslim response to the Crusades, and has published a number of articles and books on the topic, including The Book of the Jihad of 'Ali ibn Tahir al-Sulami (d. 1106): Text, Translation and Commentary (Ashgate, 2015); and Muslims and Crusaders: Christianity's Wars in the Middle East, 1095-1382, from the Islamic Sources (Routledge, 2014). More information may be found at Niall's web site.

Craig Keating Instructor

Phone: 604.323.5826
Office: B247b
Email: ckeating@langara.ca

Craig Keating completed his Ph.D. in 20th century European history at McMaster University in 1996. He joined the Department of History at Langara College in January, 1992, and throughout the 1990s taught here as well as at UBC and Simon Fraser University. 

Craig regularly teaches some of the core courses of the European and world history curriculum in the department - History 1115 (the modern world, 1900-1939) and History 1130 (the modern world, 1939-present). He has also developed a variety of courses that explore more focussed themes in the modern history - environmental history (History 2260), the history of the sixties (History 2245), and the modern middle east (History 2255). 

Outside Langara, Craig is active in local and provincial politics. He has been a Councillor in the City of North Vancouver since 1999 and is currently serving as President of the BC NDP. He also volunteers with the Hillman Medical Education Fund, an organization that supports medical education projects throughout the developing world in south Asia and Africa.

 

Jennifer Knapp Coordinator

Phone: 604.323.5481
Office: B247c
Email: jknapp@langara.ca

Jennifer Knapp received her PhD in Classical Archaeology from the University of Missouri--Columbia in 2014.  Originally from Vancouver, she completed her BA (2000) and MA (2002) at UBC.  She is currently the coordinator of the Classical Studies program at Langara and teaches introductory Latin, and classes in ancient Greek and Roman culture, history, and art.


Jen’s research focuses on the Hellenistic period Greek settlements in Calabria, Italy.  She is studying and publishing the pottery from two Calabrian archaeological sites: Contrada Mella (Oppido Mamertina), a 3rd-1st century BCE Italic settlement, and Monte Palazzi, a 5th-4th century Greek frontier fort.  She is also working for the Bregatorto Project, which is excavating two sites in the Aspromonte.

Marjory Lang Instructor

Phone: 604.323.5837
Office: B247e
Email: mlang@langara.ca

Sean Maschmann Instructor

Phone: 604.323.5360
Office: B247j
Email: smaschmann@langara.ca

Anne Toews Instructor

Phone: 604.323.5369
Office: B247c
Email: atoews@langara.ca

Anne Toews teaches courses in Canadian history, history of the family, and history of medicine at Langara, and is also part of the teaching team in the Family Studies program. She has published articles that reflect her interests in labour history and the history of socialism in Canada. Anne's current research project examines how differing understandings of the relationship between human bodies and the state have affected the history of Medicare in Canada.