Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The program can be completed in two years if started in Fall semester; can be started in other semesters, but may take longer than two years to complete.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Science Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including the following:

Courses Credits
All of
CPSC 1050 Introduction to Computer Science
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Offers a broad overview of the computer science discipline. Provides students with an appreciation for and an understanding of the many different aspects of the discipline. Topics include information and data representation; introduction to computer hardware and programming; networks; applications (e.g., spreadsheet, database); social networking; ethics; and history. Intended for both students expecting to continue in computer science as well as for those taking it for general interest.

Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CPSC 1150 Program Design
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Provides a general understanding of computing environment and stored information; teaches algorithm development and fundamentals of programming using a suitable high-level language (e.g., Java); introduces abstraction concepts; and focuses on program design and implementation using the procedural programming paradigm.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: MDT 85; a minimum "B" grade in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Precalculus 12; one of MATH 1171, 1173/1183, 1174; a minimum "C" grade in one of CPSC 1040 or 1045; or a minimum "B" grade in CPSC 1050.

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CPSC 1160 Algorithms and Data Structures I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Covers low-level operations, recursion, systematic software development, abstract data types, creation of libraries of reusable routines, sorting and searching algorithms, efficiency, algorithm analysis, pointers, arrays, dynamic memory management, linked lists, stacks, queues, introduction to hashing, binary trees and tree traversals, and advanced data manipulation. Object-oriented programming will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in one of CPSC 1150 or 1155; and one of the following: a minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1170, 1171, 1173, or 1174; or a minimum "C+" in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12; or MDT 85. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CPSC 1181 Object-oriented Computing
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Introduces the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented (OO) perspective: abstraction; objects; classes and class hierarchies; methods; parameter passing; encapsulation and information hiding; inheritance; polymorphism. OO design with modeling tools (e.g., class diagrams). Application of simple container/collection classes; event-driven programming; exception handling; GUI; multi-threading; and networking. Emphasizes good software engineering principles using a language that supports the OO paradigm (e.g., Java).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in one of CPSC 1150 or CPSC 1155; or permission of department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CPSC 2150 Algorithms and Data Structures II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Linear and non-linear structures and their implementation using the object-oriented programming paradigm. Topics include algorithm analysis, algorithmic paradigms (divide and conquer, greedy heuristic, backtracking and dynamic programming), data representation, matrices, lists, stacks, queues, mappings, dictionaries, binary trees, balanced trees, B-trees, tree traversals, meta-languages, expression trees, prefix, infix and postfix expressions and conversions, priority queues and heaps, search trees, hashing, Huffman codes, graphs, and graph algorithms.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in CPSC 1160; or permission of department. CPSC 1181 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 2362 Linear Algebra
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introductory course on vectors, matrices, linear equations and their applications. Systems of linear equations, matrix notation, Gaussian elimination. Operations on matrices, determinants, Vectors in n-dimensional space, dot and cross products, lines and planes. Linear combinations of vectors, independence, subspaces, the concepts of basis and dimension. Orthonormal bases for subspaces, the Gram-Schmidt algorithm, orthogonal matrices. Application to the theory of least squares and the pseudo-inverse. Linear and affine transformations, change of basis, application to computer graphics. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalizable matrices, application to stochastic matrices, symmetric matrices, quadratic forms, conic sections.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 2362 or 1252.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in MATH 1271, 1273, or 1274; or a minimum "A" grade in MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253 and concurrent registration in MATH 1271, 1273 or 1274. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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Two of
CPSC 1280 or a 2nd year CPSC course
6
One of
MATH 1171 Calculus I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with differentiation. The major topics include limits (intuitive approach), development and definition of derivatives, differentiation techniques (algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions), curve sketching, applications of derivatives (optimization, related rates, linear motion, differential approximations), antiderivatives, growth and decay.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, or 1174.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "A" grade in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Precalculus 12; permission of department based on the MDT process (MDT 95); or a minimum "B-" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1173 Calculus I with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in differential calculus, the study of how quantities change. Topics include limits, the definition and interpretations of the derivative, rules and techniques for computing derivatives, using the derivative to study problems involving rates of change, approximation, graphs, and optimization. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1183. See the description of MATH 1183 for more detail about these activities.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, or 1174.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 090); or a minimum "C+" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1183.

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MATH 1183 Computer Explorations for Calculus I
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1173. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used, and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of ideas being studied in MATH 1173.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1173.

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One of
MATH 1271 Calculus II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with integration and series. The major topics include the concept of integration, techniques of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1271, 1273, or 1274.

Prerequisite(s): One of MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

More Information »

MATH 1273 Calculus II with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in integral calculus, the study of how quantities accumulate. Topics include the definition of the definite integral, interpretations and properties of the integral, techniques for computing integrals, techniques for approximating integrals, applications of integrals, and the study of infinite series. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1283. See the description of MATH 1283 for more detail about these activities.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1271, 1273, or 1274.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 1253 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1173, or permission of the department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1283.

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MATH 1283 Computer Explorations for Calculus II
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1273. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of the ideas being studied in MATH 1273.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1273.

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Two of
Two
university-transferable arts (6 credits, excluding ENGLCMNS, and MATH)
6
Two
second-year science (6 credits)
6
Four
university-transferable electives (12 credits), at least one of which is in a lab science.
12

The program can be completed in two years if started in Fall semester; can be started in other semesters, but may take longer than two years to complete.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Science Degree, students must complete a minimum of 69 credits including the following:

Courses Credits
All of
COOP 2301 Co-operative Work Placement I
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 22.5

Work experience and report. Practical application of theoretical knowledge gained in academic studies to enhance skills and to provide professional and personal development. Co-op work placements consist of full time work in a student's area of study. Evaluation will consist of employer evaluation, work term report, and presentation.

Co-operative Education courses cannot be used to meet elective requirements.

Students will only receive credit for COOP 2301, or COOP 2302 and 2303.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum "C" grade in BUSM 2300, COOP 2300, or EXPE 2300; minimum 2.6 GPA; acceptance to the co-op option; and confirmed co-op work placement.

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CPSC 1050 Introduction to Computer Science
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Offers a broad overview of the computer science discipline. Provides students with an appreciation for and an understanding of the many different aspects of the discipline. Topics include information and data representation; introduction to computer hardware and programming; networks; applications (e.g., spreadsheet, database); social networking; ethics; and history. Intended for both students expecting to continue in computer science as well as for those taking it for general interest.

Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

More Information »

CPSC 1150 Program Design
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Provides a general understanding of computing environment and stored information; teaches algorithm development and fundamentals of programming using a suitable high-level language (e.g., Java); introduces abstraction concepts; and focuses on program design and implementation using the procedural programming paradigm.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: MDT 85; a minimum "B" grade in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Precalculus 12; one of MATH 1171, 1173/1183, 1174; a minimum "C" grade in one of CPSC 1040 or 1045; or a minimum "B" grade in CPSC 1050.

More Information »

CPSC 1160 Algorithms and Data Structures I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Covers low-level operations, recursion, systematic software development, abstract data types, creation of libraries of reusable routines, sorting and searching algorithms, efficiency, algorithm analysis, pointers, arrays, dynamic memory management, linked lists, stacks, queues, introduction to hashing, binary trees and tree traversals, and advanced data manipulation. Object-oriented programming will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in one of CPSC 1150 or 1155; and one of the following: a minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1170, 1171, 1173, or 1174; or a minimum "C+" in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12; or MDT 85. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

More Information »

CPSC 1181 Object-oriented Computing
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Introduces the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented (OO) perspective: abstraction; objects; classes and class hierarchies; methods; parameter passing; encapsulation and information hiding; inheritance; polymorphism. OO design with modeling tools (e.g., class diagrams). Application of simple container/collection classes; event-driven programming; exception handling; GUI; multi-threading; and networking. Emphasizes good software engineering principles using a language that supports the OO paradigm (e.g., Java).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of "C" in one of CPSC 1150 or CPSC 1155; or permission of department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

More Information »

CPSC 2150 Algorithms and Data Structures II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Linear and non-linear structures and their implementation using the object-oriented programming paradigm. Topics include algorithm analysis, algorithmic paradigms (divide and conquer, greedy heuristic, backtracking and dynamic programming), data representation, matrices, lists, stacks, queues, mappings, dictionaries, binary trees, balanced trees, B-trees, tree traversals, meta-languages, expression trees, prefix, infix and postfix expressions and conversions, priority queues and heaps, search trees, hashing, Huffman codes, graphs, and graph algorithms.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in CPSC 1160; or permission of department. CPSC 1181 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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EXPE 2300 Employment Strategies for Current Labour Markets 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

Formerly COOP 2300

EXPE 2300 is a combined lecture/seminar course that will provide students with knowledge of what it takes to get a job in today's constantly changing workplace. This course will give students a chance to learn as well as practice each of the steps towards attaining a job, including self-assessment; resume and cover letter writing; networking and interviewing skills; as well as job search tactics. By completing this course, each student will have the resources to make a positive, lasting impression on prospective employers. This course complements other curriculum already offered in career programs with the Co-operative Education option and is designed to further develop specific competencies related to employment in the student's field of study. The final project is to produce a professional career portfolio.

Students will receive credit for only one of BUSM 2300, COOP 2300, and EXPE 2300.

Prerequisite(s): English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in BC English 12 or equivalent; a minimum 67% in BC English Literature 12; a minimum 67% in BC English First Peoples 12; a minimum "C-" in a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

More Information »

MATH 2362 Linear Algebra
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introductory course on vectors, matrices, linear equations and their applications. Systems of linear equations, matrix notation, Gaussian elimination. Operations on matrices, determinants, Vectors in n-dimensional space, dot and cross products, lines and planes. Linear combinations of vectors, independence, subspaces, the concepts of basis and dimension. Orthonormal bases for subspaces, the Gram-Schmidt algorithm, orthogonal matrices. Application to the theory of least squares and the pseudo-inverse. Linear and affine transformations, change of basis, application to computer graphics. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalizable matrices, application to stochastic matrices, symmetric matrices, quadratic forms, conic sections.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 2362 or 1252.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in MATH 1271, 1273, or 1274; or a minimum "A" grade in MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253 and concurrent registration in MATH 1271, 1273 or 1274. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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Notes:
1 formerly BUSM 2300/COOP 2300
 
Two of
CPSC 1280 or a 2nd year CPSC course
6
One of
MATH 1171 Calculus I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with differentiation. The major topics include limits (intuitive approach), development and definition of derivatives, differentiation techniques (algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions), curve sketching, applications of derivatives (optimization, related rates, linear motion, differential approximations), antiderivatives, growth and decay.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, or 1174.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "A" grade in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Precalculus 12; permission of department based on the MDT process (MDT 95); or a minimum "B-" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Principles of Mathematics 12 or Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

More Information »

MATH 1173 Calculus I with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in differential calculus, the study of how quantities change. Topics include limits, the definition and interpretations of the derivative, rules and techniques for computing derivatives, using the derivative to study problems involving rates of change, approximation, graphs, and optimization. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1183. See the description of MATH 1183 for more detail about these activities.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, or 1174.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 090); or a minimum "C+" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1183.

More Information »

MATH 1183 Computer Explorations for Calculus I
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1173. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used, and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of ideas being studied in MATH 1173.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1173.

More Information »

One of
MATH 1271 Calculus II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with integration and series. The major topics include the concept of integration, techniques of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1271, 1273, or 1274.

Prerequisite(s): One of MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

More Information »

MATH 1273 Calculus II with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in integral calculus, the study of how quantities accumulate. Topics include the definition of the definite integral, interpretations and properties of the integral, techniques for computing integrals, techniques for approximating integrals, applications of integrals, and the study of infinite series. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1283. See the description of MATH 1283 for more detail about these activities.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: MATH 1271, 1273, or 1274.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 1253 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1173, or permission of the department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1283.

More Information »

MATH 1283 Computer Explorations for Calculus II
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1273. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of the ideas being studied in MATH 1273.

Corequisite(s): MATH 1273.

More Information »

Two of
Two
university-transferable arts courses (6 credits, excluding ENGLCMNS, and MATH)
6
Two
second-year science (6 credits)
6
Four
university-transferable electives (12 credits), at least one of which is in a lab science.
 

Program Option Notes:

Students who wish to participate in this Co-operative Education option must maintain above-average academic standing and demonstrate potential for success in their chosen professional field.

One four month (minimum 420 hours) work term needs to be completed for a Co-op designated diploma. Employers provide Co-op instructors with job descriptions to be posted. Students submit their resumes via the Co-op instructors who will submit the package to the employer and arrange job interviews. Students are strongly encouraged to start building their professional network and be an active participant in self-marketing in order to source their Co-op work placement.

Employers make the hiring decisions and establish the working conditions, salary and benefits. The Co-operative Education option has proven to be of great benefit to students. Students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge, to develop skills in a practical work setting, and to gain related experience before commencing their professional careers.