Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

Langara College’s two-year (four-term) Diploma in Criminal Justice prepares students for a variety of careers with public and private agencies in the field of law enforcement. It is primarily designed for those seeking an entry-level job in the field. However, individual courses may be available from time to time to non-program students at Langara College and to those who wish to upgrade their knowledge and skills from the field. It is designed to be taken full-time, but may be taken part-time with departmental permission.

Students wanting to pursue further study may choose the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) Transfer Option of the Diploma in Criminal Justice. In this option, students will complete most of the bridging courses required for admission to the third year of the BBA (Business Management or Marketing Management concentration).

The Criminal Justice Program blends university-transfer academic arts courses, skills-based courses, and practical experience. Courses are offered during the semesters beginning in January and September of each year.

YEAR ONE

Courses Credits
All of:
CJUS 1217 Security
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course provides a basic level of instruction for private security accordance with the first component of the Basic Security Training Standards (B.S.T. 1) of the Ministry of the Attorney General for British Columbia Licensing. In addition, the course will focus on the role of private security in the protection of commercial and industrial operations against profit loss. The instructor and guest lecturers will cover loss through theft, fraud, robbery, burglary, vandalism, fire, carelessness, etc.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1115 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the various components of the Canadian Criminal Justice System (CJS), the roles of its principle participants, the interaction between the components, and some of the issues which both facilitate and complicate the administration of justice in Canada. The course will also focus on special topics that include: Youth, Natives and Women in the CJS; the Charter and the CJS; and the changing role of the corrections and the Criminal Justice System. Finally, there will be an in-depth examination of the Donald Marshall Jr. case and the subsequent Royal Commission inquiry into the Marshall case.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1116 Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

General introduction to jurisprudence, sources and divisions of law, the development of the Canadian Constitution, major legal institutions, doctrines of Precedent and Stare Decisis, the rules and principles of statutory interpretation, and significant areas of substantive law.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1125 Introduction to Criminology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to criminology as an academic discipline and as a profession. The course will examine different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology; explore the relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines; provide an overview of the history and evolution of criminological thought; and develop a critical appraisal of theoretical explanations, research methods, and the philosophical and political foundations of modern criminological policy.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1215 Introduction to Policing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will examine many issues affecting policing in Canada. Time will be spent tracing the historical underpinnings of the Canadian policing experience and reviewing how these events dictated and confused the mandate of the police officer. Contemporary issues to be explored will include the selection, training, and promoting of officers; the types of police work, specifically the patrol and detective functions; community policing; police powers; discretion; police misconduct; the police sub-culture; and the police organization.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1216 Criminal Law
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

General introduction to the nature, scope, sources, and general principles of Criminal Law in Canada. Review of the history and evolution of Canadian Criminal Law. Study of the concepts of Mens Rea and Actus Reus. Critical examination of legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. Analysis of criminal responsibility. Review of legal principles in relation to selected major crimes and defences in Canada.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

PHED 1112 Introduction to Physical Fitness
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to personal physical fitness development. Although the course is principally geared to mild but continuous and progressive exercise, there will also be opportunity for higher levels of performance. Some individual fitness testing is conducted to indicate personal fitness levels and place you in the appropriate programs. Grading is based mainly on attendance and participation. Graded S/U.

More Information »

POLI 1100 Introduction to Government and Politics
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of government and politics. It examines the major methods, approaches and issues in Political Science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process.

More Information »

PSYC 1115 Introduction to Biological, Cognitive, and Developmental Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to research methods, biological bases of behaviour, sensation and perception, development, consciousness, learning, and memory. PSYC 1115 and PSYC 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

More Information »

PSYC 1215 Introduction to Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to thinking, language, intelligence, personality, emotion, stress and health, motivation, social behavior, and psychological disorders and therapies. PSYC 1115 and 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

More Information »

One of:
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

More Information »

ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

More Information »

YEAR TWO

Courses Credits
All of:
BUSM 1500 Business Presentation Skills
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will develop the communication skills to prepare students to act effectively in a range of practical business situations. It will include skill development in managing meetings, public speaking and interpersonal communications in a business setting. Students will be required to develop presentations using PowerPoint.

More Information »

CMNS 1118 Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Training in writing skills, with emphasis on business writing in a career context. Writing projects include: memos, letters, reports, resumes, and employment correspondence.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

CRIM 1220 Research Methods in Criminology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an overview of research methods typically used in criminology and other social science disciplines. The course will cover both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Topics include the practice of social science research; ethics of research; data gathering strategies; and how to analyze data and present results in a written report. This course does not involve statistical analysis; a background in mathematics is not required.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, 1116, 1125, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2315 Introduction to Corrections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with various theoretical and practical issues facing the corrections arm of the Canadian Criminal Justice System. Included in the course will be an exploration of the historical underpinning of Canadian corrections as well as its role and present structure. This course will examine sentencing options available to the judiciary and their impact on the operations of corrections. In addition, this course will explore relevant issues relating to life as an inmate or a correctional officer within the present system.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2316 Criminal Law and Court Procedure
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence, including cross-national comparisons where appropriate. Detailed examination of the impact of the Charter of Rights on criminal procedure and admissibility of evidence. Review of various procedures contained in the Young Offenders Act and selected regulatory legislation.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2417 Ethics and Professional Issues in Justice and Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will examine various ethical and other issues which affect professionals in the fields of justice and law. Students will review relationships with clients, the public, the government, employers and other professionals. Professional codes of conduct and government and legal regulation will be referred to. Topics will include confidentiality, conflicts of interest and duty, ethics in research and in decision-making, and use and abuse of power, as well as others of interest to students in the course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

PHED 1118 Healthy Lifestyles
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

As the third and final course in a series, this course will assist the student in applying the concepts covered to the "real world" working situation. Personal physical fitness levels will be reassessed once more and physical training programs maintained. The healthy living focus will expand to include topics such as stress management, effects of shift work, informed consumerism, and protective health behaviours. Graded S/U.

More Information »

PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

More Information »

PSYC 2326 Psychological Disorders and Mental Health
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this course, students review a number of psychological disorders as outlined in the current edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) and/or other classification systems. Students will examine the mental and behavioural characteristics of various disorders, their possible causes, and treatments from a broad range of theoretical perspectives. The interconnection of biological, psychological, and socio-cultural forces (the BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL model) provides the foundation for this exploration. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

More Information »

PSYC 3220 Group Dynamics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines group processes from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Lectures, small group experiential learning exercises, and participation in a major group project are used to develop a detailed understanding of group interactions as well as to provide opportunities to apply this knowledge in professional situations. Topics include group dynamics, interpersonal communication, decision-making, conflict resolution, and leadership. Additional topics, such as group dynamics in business and legal environments, may also be included.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215; or a minimum "C-" grade in BUSM 2200.

More Information »

Two of:
CRIM 1213 Women and the Justice System
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will examine historical and contemporary perspectives on women as offenders and victims of crime. The frequency and types of crime committed by women, and against women, will be explored as well as the criminal justice system's response to these issues. Specific emphasis will be given to visible minority women, women in prison, and programs and services designed for female offenders. The course will also highlight women working in the criminal justice system as well as the media's representation of women who come into conflict with the law.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2415 Multiculturalism and the Criminal Justice System
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with multicultural issues that relate to the administration of justice in Canada. The central issues to be explored are values, belief systems, culture, prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, employment equity, and immigration. Once these issues are understood, an examination will begin into those areas where culture conflicts with the philosophical and legal intent of the criminal justice system.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2416 Law, Youth, and Young Offenders
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this course, students will analyze the definitions and control mechanisms for youthful misconduct in Canadian society from an historical and in a contemporary context. Included will be an examination of state responses to criminal behaviour of young persons, especially the Young Offenders Act (YOA) and related legislation and case law. Concepts such as "juvenile delinquency" and the "young offender" will be considered.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

Program Option Notes:

  • Students are advised to check prerequisite requirements for the Arts and Science courses that are part of this program.
  • It is recommended that students take CRIM 1115 and 1116 in the first term as they are foundational courses and may be required as prerequisites for later CRIM courses.
  • It is recommended that students take ENGL 1127/1128, CRIM 1125, PSYC 1115 and 1215 as early as possible in the first year as they are foundational courses and/or may be required as prerequisites for Year 2 courses.
  • Please note that students must obtain a minimum "C" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215 before they can register in PSYC 2326, and some courses in Year 2 require students to have a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130 (or Level 4 on the LET or an essay score of 30 or higher on the LPI) in order to register.
  • Students must complete all courses in the diploma program with a minimum "C" grade in order to graduate. Exception: Students may be permitted to meet graduate requirements if they have a "C-" grade in no more than one of the program support courses, i.e., courses other than CRIM xxxx.

YEAR ONE

Courses Credits
All of:
CRIM 1115 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is designed to introduce the student to the various components of the Canadian Criminal Justice System (CJS), the roles of its principle participants, the interaction between the components, and some of the issues which both facilitate and complicate the administration of justice in Canada. The course will also focus on special topics that include: Youth, Natives and Women in the CJS; the Charter and the CJS; and the changing role of the corrections and the Criminal Justice System. Finally, there will be an in-depth examination of the Donald Marshall Jr. case and the subsequent Royal Commission inquiry into the Marshall case.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1116 Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

General introduction to jurisprudence, sources and divisions of law, the development of the Canadian Constitution, major legal institutions, doctrines of Precedent and Stare Decisis, the rules and principles of statutory interpretation, and significant areas of substantive law.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1125 Introduction to Criminology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to criminology as an academic discipline and as a profession. The course will examine different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology; explore the relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines; provide an overview of the history and evolution of criminological thought; and develop a critical appraisal of theoretical explanations, research methods, and the philosophical and political foundations of modern criminological policy.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1215 Introduction to Policing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will examine many issues affecting policing in Canada. Time will be spent tracing the historical underpinnings of the Canadian policing experience and reviewing how these events dictated and confused the mandate of the police officer. Contemporary issues to be explored will include the selection, training, and promoting of officers; the types of police work, specifically the patrol and detective functions; community policing; police powers; discretion; police misconduct; the police sub-culture; and the police organization.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 1216 Criminal Law
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

General introduction to the nature, scope, sources, and general principles of Criminal Law in Canada. Review of the history and evolution of Canadian Criminal Law. Study of the concepts of Mens Rea and Actus Reus. Critical examination of legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. Analysis of criminal responsibility. Review of legal principles in relation to selected major crimes and defences in Canada.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

POLI 1100 Introduction to Government and Politics
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of government and politics. It examines the major methods, approaches and issues in Political Science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process.

More Information »

PSYC 1215 Introduction to Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to thinking, language, intelligence, personality, emotion, stress and health, motivation, social behavior, and psychological disorders and therapies. PSYC 1115 and 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

More Information »

One of:
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

More Information »

ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

More Information »

Two of:
Electives chosen from the list below (see note 1).
6

YEAR TWO

Courses Credits
All of:
CMNS 1118 Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Training in writing skills, with emphasis on business writing in a career context. Writing projects include: memos, letters, reports, resumes, and employment correspondence.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

CRIM 1220 Research Methods in Criminology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an overview of research methods typically used in criminology and other social science disciplines. The course will cover both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Topics include the practice of social science research; ethics of research; data gathering strategies; and how to analyze data and present results in a written report. This course does not involve statistical analysis; a background in mathematics is not required.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, 1116, 1125, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2315 Introduction to Corrections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with various theoretical and practical issues facing the corrections arm of the Canadian Criminal Justice System. Included in the course will be an exploration of the historical underpinning of Canadian corrections as well as its role and present structure. This course will examine sentencing options available to the judiciary and their impact on the operations of corrections. In addition, this course will explore relevant issues relating to life as an inmate or a correctional officer within the present system.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2316 Criminal Law and Court Procedure
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence, including cross-national comparisons where appropriate. Detailed examination of the impact of the Charter of Rights on criminal procedure and admissibility of evidence. Review of various procedures contained in the Young Offenders Act and selected regulatory legislation.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2417 Ethics and Professional Issues in Justice and Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will examine various ethical and other issues which affect professionals in the fields of justice and law. Students will review relationships with clients, the public, the government, employers and other professionals. Professional codes of conduct and government and legal regulation will be referred to. Topics will include confidentiality, conflicts of interest and duty, ethics in research and in decision-making, and use and abuse of power, as well as others of interest to students in the course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

Two of:
CRIM 1213 Women and the Justice System
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will examine historical and contemporary perspectives on women as offenders and victims of crime. The frequency and types of crime committed by women, and against women, will be explored as well as the criminal justice system's response to these issues. Specific emphasis will be given to visible minority women, women in prison, and programs and services designed for female offenders. The course will also highlight women working in the criminal justice system as well as the media's representation of women who come into conflict with the law.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2415 Multiculturalism and the Criminal Justice System
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with multicultural issues that relate to the administration of justice in Canada. The central issues to be explored are values, belief systems, culture, prejudice, discrimination, stereotyping, employment equity, and immigration. Once these issues are understood, an examination will begin into those areas where culture conflicts with the philosophical and legal intent of the criminal justice system.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

CRIM 2416 Law, Youth, and Young Offenders
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this course, students will analyze the definitions and control mechanisms for youthful misconduct in Canadian society from an historical and in a contemporary context. Included will be an examination of state responses to criminal behaviour of young persons, especially the Young Offenders Act (YOA) and related legislation and case law. Concepts such as "juvenile delinquency" and the "young offender" will be considered.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of Level 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

More Information »

Three of
Electives chosen from the list below (see note 1). 
 

Program Option Notes:

  • Note 1: Electives must be chosen from the following courses: BUSM 1110; FMGT 1115, 1116, or 2293; MARK 1115; MATH 1118, 1119, 1171, or 1174; STAT 1123, 1124, or 1181. 
  • Please note that some courses in Year 2 require students to have a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130 (or Level 4 on the LET or an essay score of 30 or higher on the LPI) in order to register.
  • It is recommended that students take CRIM 1115 and 1116 in the first semester as they are foundational courses and may be required as prerequisites for later CRIM courses. 
  • It is recommended that students take CRIM 1125, ENGL 1127/1128, PSYC 1115 and 1215 as early as possible in the first year as they are foundational courses and/or may be required as prerequisites for Year 2 courses.
  • Students wanting to transfer into the Year 3 of the BBA (Business Management or Marketing Management concentrations) must complete five of the elective courses listed in Note 1 and must meet the minimum CGPA requirement for admission to the third year of the BBA. They must also complete ECON 1220 or 1221, which is a required bridging course for entry into the third year of the BBA.
  • Students must complete all courses in the diploma program with a minimum "C" grade in order to graduate. Exception: Students may be permitted to meet graduation requirements if they have a "C-" grade in no more than one of the program support courses, i.e., courses other than CRIM xxxx. 

Program Notes:

Program students must complete all courses in each term with a minimum "C" grade to enrol in the following term. In some cases, prior written approval may be granted by the Department Chair to permit a student to advance to the next term. Students who are given a waiver will be required to repeat the course to obtain the minimum "C" grade required for graduation. (Exception: Students may be permitted to meet graduation requirements if they have a "C-" grade in no more than one of the program support courses, i.e., BUSM, CMNS, ENGL, PHED, PHIL POLI, or PSYC,.)

Program students will be encouraged to participate in an appropriate volunteer experience with a criminal justice agency while in the program. Students will be encouraged to attend various extracurricular activities, such as field trips and guest speaker lectures, from time to time while in the program.