Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The Diploma in Recreation Leadership Program combines a strong foundation in the concepts and theory of recreation and leisure with leadership, communication, and business skills development tailored to a recreation practitioner.

Practical experience is emphasized throughout the program, both in the classroom and in the field. In the Diploma, students will gain a well-rounded and thorough understanding of the field of recreation, including facilities and other environments. Each student will have the opportunity to develop their personal portfolio within the recreation field and to directly apply their knowledge during internship.

Students will learn how to effectively lead, instruct, facilitate, motivate, and supervise within the recreation field. They will learn how to design, implement, and market quality programs, services and special events for diverse participants. These skill sets will be able to be applied in a recreation, health promotion, community service, tourism, and/or volunteer setting.

Graduates of the Diploma in Recreation Leadership Program have the skills, knowledge, and ability for direct leadership, instructor, and some entry-level supervisory jobs. With experience and on-going professional development, graduates can build a career in recreation or put this leadership skill set to use in another field.

Upon receipt of the Diploma in Recreation Leadership, students are eligible to apply to the Bachelor of Recreation Management (BRM) Degree. The BRM, a two-year program (when taken full-time), which is fully online and provides the next step toward a management position in community recreation.

CURRICULUM

Total Credits: 60

Courses Credits
All of
BUSM 1100 Introduction to Business in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to Canada's economy, different economic systems, business ethics and social responsibility, legal fundamentals and management. The course examines organizational and human resource management concepts and practices, marketing, accounting, finance, and operations management.

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MARK 1115 Introduction to Marketing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Marketing is an exciting and dynamic business discipline, which offers excellent career prospects. The course covers the roles and functions of marketing in the modern business enterprise with particular emphasis on the elements in marketing such as product planning and development, pricing, promotion and distribution. The course delivery is a series of lectures including a lot of interaction through discussion, teamwork, videos, practical exercises and case studies so you can relate the material discussed to real life business challenges.

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RECR 1160 Foundations of Leisure and Recreation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course presents a number of key concepts, issues, and topics related to the field of leisure and recreation. These include the basic history, psychology, and philosophy of recreation and leisure, as well as the scope of organizations and programs within Canada, i.e., the public, not-for-profit, and commercial sectors.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 1162 Direct Leadership in Recreation
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 6.0

This course is designed as an introduction to leadership techniques and theory as they relate to direct leadership of recreation activities. Students will learn skills for organizing and leading specific recreation activities, including co-operative games and group initiatives. A primary (and required) experience in this course is a four or five-day Outdoor Field School. There are additional costs related to this course.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 1166 Valuing Diversity in Leadership
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

An overview of the history, philosophy, and scope of the provision of inclusive leisure services for all members of a community. Emphasis will be placed upon identification of barriers to participation, the impact of such barriers, and a plausible process for change. Examples of persons who have diverse backgrounds and abilities will be explored, as will familiarization with available services and support organizations.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 1168 Recreation Program Planning
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course is an introduction to the principles of planning, designing, implementing and evaluating recreation programs and services. This is accomplished through the application of a rational planning process involving needs and market assessment, developing objectives, value-based intentional program design models, advertising and evaluation techniques.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.Prerequisite(s): RECR 1160.

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RECR 1170 Introduction to Recreation Facilities and Environments
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to the design and operation of various recreation facilities and environments. Course topics include design, legislation, regulations, programming, preparation for special events, introductory human resource management, safety of environments, fiscal planning and budgeting, operations of selected facilities, and new trends and issues. It also includes field trips to selected recreation facilities and observation projects.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 1270 Applied Skills in Recreation Operations
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

The course is designed for the student to learn fundamental supervisory skills in the areas of legal liability, labour-management relations, security, contracting out, preventative maintenance, custodial procedures, and staffing for efficient maintenance of recreation facilities. Includes field trips to selected recreation facilities and observation projects.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 2260 The Arts and Heritage in Recreation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course explores the nature of and values associated with arts and heritage in recreation. The relationships and responsibilities of recreation organizations, and of leadership personnel, to the provision and facilitation of arts and heritage opportunities will be a primary focus.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 2288 Personal Portfolio Development and Seminar
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 6.0

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and methods of reflective practice, niche recreation specialties, and self-directed learning. Students will "learn how to learn" from their own professionally-related experience and from the experience of others. With faculty supervision, students will develop self-directed learning plans to build their skills, knowledge, and attitudes in recreation specialty areas of their choice. Students will begin to develop and tailor "portfolios of experiences and learning" that can form the basis of their future professional development and life-long learning. Graded S/U.RRegistration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.

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RECR 2361 Applied Leadership in Recreation Organizations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course presents a number of concepts, skills, and issues related to effective leadership in recreation organizations. These include self-leadership, decision-making, group dynamics, supervision, and teamwork skills.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.Prerequisite(s): RECR 1160

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RECR 2388 Internship Orientation and Portfolio Development
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 5.0

This course has two interrelated themes. The first theme involves an orientation to the students' up-coming internships (in the fourth term). This orientation will include an introduction to the duties, responsibilities and assignments of the students as interns, and the process of investigating, assessing and choosing internship placements. The second theme is the continuation of the student's portfolio development in an area of their chosen recreation specialty. With faculty supervision, the students will develop self-directed learning plans and will acquire the "essential abilities", including certifications, that are needed by all competent practitioners in the field of recreation. Graded S/U.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.Prerequisite(s): RECR 2288. This course must be taken in the term (Fall Semester) prior to the Internship Course.

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RECR 2470 Recreation Issues and Trends
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 6.0 | Lab: 2.0

Problem-based learning approach to selected trends and issues in the field of recreation, and exploring their application to recreation settings. Various research techniques are investigated and practiced to meet these goals.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.Prerequisite(s): RECR 1160.

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One of
RECR 2487 Recreation Internship
12

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 7.0 | Lab: 21.0

This internship is a field-based contract with a recognized agency where the student can practice the learning outcomes of the courses from the first three semesters of the Diploma in Recreation Leadership Program. It is a full-time, supervised learning experience lasting for 14 weeks. Student obligations and responsibilities include both practical hours and academic research. The nature of the services provided by agencies often required flexible work schedules involving weekend and evening duty. Graded S/U.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.Students will receive credit for only one of RECR 2487 and 2497.Prerequisite(s): a minimum "C" grade in all 1000 and 2000 level Recreation courses (or an "S" in courses graded S/U).If missing three credits in one non-Recreation course, a student contact the Department chair, in writing, requesting to register in either RECR 2487 or RECR 2497.

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RECR 2497 Diploma Reflective Practicum in the Workplace
12

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 7.0 | Lab: 21.0

This course is designed to help currently employed, full-time recreation practitioners who have a minimum of five years direct experience as a programmer (or equivalent level) become more intentional and more effective in their professional practice. Key concepts in the course include experiential learning, reflective practice, and the analysis of action theories. Learners will relate these concepts to their own workplaces with the help of a faculty supervisor and with the support of their employer. The course will take place at each learner's workplace. Students must judge their time to accommodate weekly communication with their faculty advisory and to write weekly reports about their on-site learning and research. A major term paper is also required. Prospective students must apply to the department for permission to take this course. Contact the Recreation Co-ordinator for more information. Graded S/U.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and the Recreation Leadership Diploma.Students will receive credit for only one of RECR 2487 and 2497.Prerequisite(s): a minimum "C" grade in all 1000 and 2000 level Recreation courses (or an "S" in courses graded S/U).If missing three credits in one non-Recreation course, a student contact the Department chair, in writing, requesting to register in either RECR 2487 or RECR 2497.

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One of
CMNS 1115 Interpersonal Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Interpersonal communications theory put into practice in exercises, group and individual projects that cover small group dynamics, interviews, and oral presentations.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; IELTS 6.5 or equivalent; or Duolingo 110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 2 (or LPI equivalent) can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127 or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
CMNS 1118 Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Training in writing skills, with emphasis on business writing in a career context. Writing projects include: memos, letters, reports, resumes, and employment correspondence.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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One
Elective (chosen from any of the Langara course offerings that are eligible to be used towards a Langara credential)
3
60 Credits

Program Option Notes:

Students must complete all of the 1000 and 2000 level Recreation courses with a minimum "C" grade (or an "S" grade in courses graded S/U) to be eligible to register in either RECR 2487 or RECR 2497.

If missing three credits in one non-Recreation course, a student must contact the Department Chair, in writing, requesting to register in either RECR 2487 or RECR 2497.