Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The Diploma in Food, Nutrition, and Health Transfer is a limited enrolment program, developed in collaboration with UBC.

UBC has committed to preferential admission to the UBC Food, Nutrition & Health (BSc) Program in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, for students who have completed this transfer program with a minimum CGPA of 3.0.

Total Credits: 60

Courses Credits
One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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Electives
Courses required for admission can be used to satisfy the electives requirement. Courses from ABE (adult basic education), COOP, and EXPE will not be accepted.
25


Students must complete the following required courses within two calendar years of starting the program in order to be eligible to graduate:

Courses Credits
All of
BIOL 1191 Health Science II: Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A systems approach to the anatomy and the human body's normal function and maintenance, applying the material studied in BIOL 1190: Health Science I. Laboratory work will include gross and microscopic human anatomy plus physiological assessment of body function.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1190; or permission of the Biology department.Note: Nursing Program students must achieve a minimum "C+" grade in BIOL 1191 to meet program progression requirements.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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CHEM 2316 Organic Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds including hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds; and an introduction to reaction mechanisms, to stereochemistry and to the use of spectroscopy in organic chemistry.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2416 Organic Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include aromatic compounds, alcohols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbonylic acids, amines, and amino acids. Bio-organic systems may also be covered.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2316 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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FSRV 1213 Production and Service Systems
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this online course, students will study the various systems in place for the efficient operation of an institutional food service. Areas of study include meal production, styles of meal service, catering, special events planning, warewashing. Course involves some fieldwork.

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STAT 2225 Intermediate Statistical Inference
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This continuation of STAT 1181 for students who want a deeper treatment of the techniques and theory of data analysis. A brief review of probability and elementary inference will be followed by two-sample inferences, regression and correlation, multiple regression, design considerations, analysis of variance, and non-parametric tests.College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: STAT 1224, 2225, 3222, or 3223.Prerequisite(s): STAT 1181 with a "C-" grade or higher, or STAT 1124 or 1127 with an "A" grade or higher. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
MATH 1271 Calculus II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with integration and series. The major topics include the concept of integration, techniques of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): One of MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1273 Calculus II with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in integral calculus, the study of how quantities accumulate. Topics include the definition of the definite integral, interpretations and properties of the integral, techniques for computing integrals, techniques for approximating integrals, applications of integrals, and the study of infinite series. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1283. See the description of MATH 1283 for more detail about these activities.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): MATH 1253 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1173, or permission of the department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.Corequisite(s): MATH 1283.

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MATH 1283 Computer Explorations for Calculus II
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1273. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of the ideas being studied in MATH 1273.Corequisite(s): MATH 1273.

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MATH 1274 Calculus II with Economic and Business Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The indefinite integral and techniques of integration. The definite integral and applications to business, differential equations and probability distributions. Introduction to multi variable calculus.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173, 1174, 1175, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
ANTH 1120 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human cultures. Topics include methods, some theory and a consideration of how people obtain their living (subsistence, economy), how they live together (social structure, marriage, law etc.) and their beliefs and practices (religion, arts, rituals etc.)

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PSYC 1115 Introduction to Biological, Cognitive, and Developmental Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to research methods, biological bases of behaviour, sensation and perception, development, consciousness, learning, and memory. PSYC 1115 and PSYC 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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PSYC 1215 Introduction to Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to thinking, language, intelligence, personality, emotion, stress and health, motivation, social behavior, and psychological disorders and therapies. PSYC 1115 and 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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SOCI 1120 Introduction to Sociology: Models and Concepts
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

What is the social world and our place in it? Students examine a wide range of concepts, theories, and issues that shape reciprocal relationships between society and the individual. Subjects may include culture, socialization, social interaction, groups and organizations, sexuality and society, mass media, deviance and crime, and forms of social inequality such as global and class stratification, and race and ethnic relations.Note: SOCI 1120 and 1121 may be taken in any order, or concurrently, as they are complementary first-year courses.

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SOCI 1121 Introduction to Sociology: Structures and Processes
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

What is the role of the individual in society and how does society influence the lives of individuals? Students explore a wide range of concepts, theories, and issues that shape reciprocal relationships between society and the individual. Subjects may include gender stratification, race and ethnicity, aging and the elderly, the economy, politics and government, the family, education, health and medicine, population, urbanization, the environment, and social movements.Note: SOCI 1120 and 1121 may be taken in any order, or concurrently, as they are complementary first-year courses.

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Program Option Notes:

  1. Courses required as prerequisites can be used to satisfy the Electives requirement. Courses from ABE, COOP, and EXPE will not be accepted.
  2. Students must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.0 in all courses taken in order to graduate from the Diploma in Food, Nutrition and Health Transfer. Students who do not achieve a minimum CPGA of 3.0 have the option of completing the Associate of Science Degree in Food and Nutrition.
  3. Students planning to pursue dietetics at UBC require both FNH 200 and LFS 250 as part of their application. They are advised to take these two courses via non-degree studies at UBC.