Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1102 Introduction to Logic
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is an introduction to elementary formal logic. Valid and invalid reasoning. Common fallacies, logical connectives "and," "or," "if ... then". Truth tables. Propositional calculus and predicate calculus.

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One of
PHIL 1101 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The primary questions dealt with are "What is the source and the limit of human knowledge?" and "What is the nature of reality?" and "What is our place in nature?" Some of the major themes discussed are knowing and believing, mind and brain, free will and determinism, truth, existence.

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PHIL 1103 Introduction to Philosophy of Science
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course considers a variety of questions in the philosophy of science, including: What is the nature of science? What is a scientific hypothesis, theory, law? What is the role of induction and deduction in science? The course considers the claims of science to objective knowledge by looking at the interplay of different forces in scientific decision-making, such as simplicity, and social, cultural, and prudential influences. No background or ability in science is presupposed beyond an interest in the subject matter.

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One of
PHIL 2201 Theory of Knowledge
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A continuation of PHIL 1101 in which some topics treated there will be examined in greater depth, and new ones introduced. We will consider three main questions: (1) What is knowledge? (How does knowing differ from believing? Is there any certain knowledge?); (2) What, if anything, can we know? (Can we know that there is an external world or the sun will rise tomorrow?); (3) How do we know what we do? (By inference or direct apprehension? By our senses, or reason, or what? Does knowledge need foundations? What is the nature of scientific knowledge?)Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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PHIL 2203 Metaphysics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A continuation of Philosophy 1101 in which some topics treated there will be examined in greater depth, and new ones introduced. We will be concerned with the nature of human beings and the universe in which we find ourselves. Topics may include the nature of mind (Is the mind the brain, or something irreducibly psychic?), personal identity (What makes us the same person in different times and places?), freedom (Are all our actions fixed by the past?), God (What is meant by the term, and does it apply to anything?), and immortality (Does everything end with our bodily death, or can we look forward to a future state?).Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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One of
PHIL 2202 Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A consideration of such questions as: When can we hold an individual morally responsible for his actions? What is freedom? What are my obligations to my community? From the courses of action open to me, what ought I to do? What is the nature of the good? The course will consider the views of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Sartre.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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PHIL 2210 Contemporary Moral Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of important moral controversies in such fields as social justice, international relations, multiculturalism, environmental ethics, corporate responsibility and personal relationships. The focus is on learning to reach balanced moral decisions, supported by sound philosophical reasoning.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year philosophy course, or consent of the instructor.

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PHIL 2226 Social and Political Philosophy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates the meaning of such concepts as freedom, justice, equality, power, authority and alienation, which lie at the roots of major contemporary ideologies such as liberalism, fascism, communism, socialism and anarchism.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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At least two courses (6 credits) of other PHIL courses (See notes 1 and 2)
6

Program Option Notes:

  1. Students may choose courses from the PHIL courses listed above if they were not used to meet the requirements of that section, e.g., students who have taken PHIL 1101 and PHIL 2201 may take PHIL 1103 and PHIL 2203 to meet the "6 credits of other PHIL courses" requirement.
  2. Students who are planning to major in philosophy are encouraged to take PHIL 1125, PHIL 2201, and PHIL 2203.