Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

Recreation is about improving people’s quality of life. It is a dynamic and diverse field that spans the public, private, and non-profit sectors. From health wellness to advocacy, recreation professionals provide leadership by creating positive environments for people of all ages to explore their potential, connect to community, increase health and wellness, celebrate cultural traditions, and live meaningful, happy lives.

The Bachelor of Recreation Management (BRM) is a degree completion program (third and fourth year of a bachelor’s degree) for students who have a recreation diploma or the equivalent (see Admissions Requirements) and who are interested in pursuing careers in the recreation field. The program is flexible and student-focused, and combines a solid foundation in management theory and practical knowledge with specialized courses in recreation. Students will work closely with recreation organizations, applying their knowledge to real-life situations as they learn.

The third and fourth year of the BRM can be completed in two years (six semesters) if taken on a full-time basis. As many of today’s students work full- or part-time, students have the option of completing the BRM on a full- or part-time basis. The program is designed to offer flexibility in delivery methods and all courses at the third- and fourth-year level are delivered online.

CURRICULUM

Third and Fourth Year Curriculum

To obtain a Bachelor of Recreation Management, students are required to complete a minimum of 60 credits in the third and fourth year of the program (minimum 120 credits in total for the degree) Students may take the online courses on a full- or part-time basis.

Listed below are the courses required to receive a Bachelor of Recreation Management. Although some courses in the program are required as prerequisites for others, there is considerable flexibility in the order that most courses may be taken. A departmental advisor is available to discuss a course sequence appropriate to the student’s personal goals. As not all courses will be offered every semester, students should take care when planning their course schedule.

Courses Credits
All of
BUSM 2115 Human Resources Management
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A course in human and industrial relations with emphasis on the various processes and techniques of acquiring and maintaining an efficient workforce. It will examine the more technical aspects of personnel management, including legal issues, compensation, and employer/employee rights in sufficient depth to give a reasonable understanding of their purpose and nature. The course will be taught using a series of seminar type lectures, readings, case histories and guest lectures.Prerequisite(s): English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in English Studies 12 or equivalent; a minimum 67% in Literary Studies 12; a minimum 67% in English First Peoples 12; a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

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BUSM 2200 Organizational Behaviour
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students in this course examine how individual and group behaviour affects organizational goal attainment and success. Topics will include individual attributes such as attitude, personality and perception, and organizational culture and management skills such as leadership, empowerment, participation, communication, and motivation. There will be a strong international focus with an emphasis on diversity, managerial ethics, and development of Total Quality Management. Students will have practical and hands-on assignments for decision making, problem solving and case analysis to improve their analytical skills.Students will receive credit for only one of BUSM 1321 and 2200.Prerequisite(s): English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in English Studies 12; a minimum 67% in Literary Studies 12; a minimum 67% in English First Peoples 12; a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

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BUSM 4120 Organizations and Change
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the underlying concepts, principles, and assumptions of organizational development. Included is an investigation of macro factors such as organizational structure, coordination and control, power, authority, organizational politics and corporate culture, and their impact on effectiveness. It develops a framework around understanding natural versus planned change, models for managing change, the development of specific skills to manage change, the human side of change, and the transition process. Understanding the dynamics of organizational change is a critical skill for contemporary managers.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the BBA and BRM programs.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum 54 credits, including CMNS 2228 with a minimum "C" grade, and six additional credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade.

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CMNS 2228 Advanced Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students in CMNS 2228 will learn advanced written communication skills, including both business and technical writing. Students will learn and practice advanced editing skills and writing for the Web.Prerequisite(s): One of CMNS 1118, ENGL 1123, 1127, or ENGL 1140, or permission of the English Department.

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FMGT 1116 Accounting for Managers
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides an overview of basic financial and management accounting principles and techniques, including the managerial use of financial statements and other financial information for decision-making purposes. Students will initially be introduced to the principles and techniques used in financial accounting. The second part of the course will explore common managerial accounting techniques such as budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and decision-making.Students in the Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting are not permitted to register in this course.

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LIBR 3210 Online Research and Analysis
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course focuses on effective methodologies to research, consult, and report on information resource findings in an online environment. Students will retrieve and evaluate information in discipline-related research, services, programs, and policies from formal and informal online sources. Students will be able to evaluate and select suitable resources that illustrate potential "best practices" and recognize circumstances requiring exhaustive versus exemplary research. Utilizing a variety of technologies, students will develop strategies to maintain currency in both technology literacy and the literature of the specific discipline. Research findings will be summarized in a report with recommendations and posted in an online environment for review by peers and other stakeholders.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including 6 credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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MARK 2100 Marketing Research
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines contemporary research methods employed in business. Emphasis is placed on understanding the process of business research and how it relates to hypothesis development, problem investigation, and management questions. The major tools and techniques in primary and secondary research are examined with special emphasis on the Internet as an effective research tool.Students will receive credit for only one of MARK 2100 and 2327.Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of 'C' in STAT 1123, 1124, or 1181; English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in English Studies 12 or equivalent; a minimum 67% in Literary Studies 12; a minimum 67% in English First Peoples 12; a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

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MARK 3250 Public Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an understanding of the role public relations plays within a variety of organizations. This course is aimed at preparing students to identify key stakeholder groups for a company and design programs for these groups. Students will practice using the public relations "tools of the trade." The material will be taught using lectures, case studies, guest speakers and group/individual assignments.Students will receive credit for only one of MARK 2450 and 3250.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum 54 credits including MARK 1115 with a minimum "C" grade, and 6 credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade; and a minimum "C" grade in CMNS 2228.

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RECR 3120 Promoting Wellness within Communities
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course focuses on the role recreation practitioners play in the development of wellness in individuals, organizations they work for, and their communities. In addition to assessing their own wellness needs and creating personal plans for a balanced lifestyle, students will learn how to assess their organizations and communities, and implement appropriate active living and wellness programs to meet these larger needs.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 3160 Leisure Theory and Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the 'advanced foundations' of leisure theory and recreation practice. It looks at key topics within the history, psychology, philosophy, and sociology of leisure, and the implications for recreation leadership.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade and RECR 1160 with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 3200 Management of Community Events and Festivals
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 1.0

Using community development and project management approaches, students will learn to plan, organize, lead, and control small scale community events as well as large-scale festivals and multi-day events in the community. Course objectives are achieved through the application of skills in the planning and organizing of a real-life event in a recreation setting.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 3230 Leadership and Management in Community Recreation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the theory and practice of enthusiastic, respectful, effective leadership in recreation. It looks at concepts and skills that can enhance positive change in groups, teams, and organizations. It also examines self-awareness, values, diversity, and creativity as they apply to recreation leadership.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade and RECR 1160 with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 3260 Managing Cultural Programming in the Community
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course builds on previous knowledge of the role arts, culture, and heritage play in community cultural development. Students will further their skills sets to include strategic cultural planning that informs and sustains effective arts management and administration. Students will acquire historical and theoretical grounding of community cultural development in relationship to best practices and increase their comprehension of key characteristics and guiding principles in order to recognize, conceptualize and deliver successful cultural programming at a local and regional level. Students will expand their understanding for and application of partnerships, collaborative engagement, community consultation and funding opportunities in order to sustain and grow civic arts programming.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade and RECR 1160 with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 4150 Community Recreation Systems
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on surveying the dynamic recreation system in a chosen community - ranging from health to local tourism. Using a mapping approach to baseline their own community, students will be able to compare and contrast this research to recreation systems in other communities through best practices research. Students will be able to use research factors such as demographics, values, cultures, and economics to recommend the feasibility of incorporating alternate recreation systems and relationships into their chosen community.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade and RECR 1160 with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 4160 Professionalism in Recreation Management
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course addresses key aspects of professionalism in the management of recreation. The characteristics of a human services professional will be outlined and then applied to the practice of recreation leadership. Using contemporary, recreation-based case studies, and building on foundational principles of the field, students will develop a framework for professional thinking and ethical decision-making.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade, or permission of the department. RECR 3160 with a minimum "C" grade.

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RECR 4270 Management of Recreation Facility Systems
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on developing and implementing a current inventory of facilities in communities, conducting needs assessments of current and future facility requirements, and planning a strategy to best meet these facility and environment needs. Students will write a business proposal for a current or future facility and facilitate the process of implementing the proposal for construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 60 credits including six credits of university-transferable English or communications with a minimum "C" grade and RECR 1160 with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department.

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RECR 4400 Applied Major Project
6

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 12.0 | Lab: 0.0

This capstone course requires each student to complete a community recreation-based project in an organization. Students will work closely with an assigned instructor who will supervise the project, provide advice, and evaluate the student's performance in carrying out the research and the final report. The project can range from the preparation of a detailed 'consulting' plan, a business plan, scholarly work, or the development of specific program or service deliverables for a community-based municipal, regional district, or profit or non-profit organization. Students are encouraged to apply the concepts, skills, and techniques gained in previous course work. This course is to be taken in the final semester of the program.Students will receive credit for only one of RECR 4300 and 4400.Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 90 credits including 6 credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade; or permission of the department. Students must be in their final semester of the BRM Program.

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One
university-transferrable elective at the 3000-level or higher
A university-transferrable elective is defined as any course that has assigned or unassigned transfer credit at UBC, SFU, UVIC, or UNBC.
3
One
university-transferrable elective
A university-transferrable elective is defined as any course that has assigned or unassigned transfer credit at UBC, SFU, UVIC, or UNBC.
3
60 Credits

Term Notes:

Students are advised to review individual course descriptions for prerequisites.

Program Option Notes:

Please note that students are responsible for their maintenance of standing while enrolled in the Bachelor of Recreation Management. Students must complete all of the 3000 and 4000 level RECR courses with a minimum "C" grade in order to be eligible to register in RECR 4400: Applied Major Project.