Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) is an interdisciplinary field of study which is concerned with the problem of human conflict, especially violent and destructive conflict, and the means by which it can be constructively and nonviolently resolved. Its interdisciplinary approach to analysis draws on the perspectives of the social sciences, history, and philosophy. Guest lecturers from these academic disciplines, as well as guests from the active world of conflict resolution, politicians, and peace leaders, will enhance the Associate Degree/Diploma and core courses, POLI 1145 ( PCCN 1201) and PCCN 1202. Each of the courses listed as requirements for the Associate Degree and Diploma Programs in Peace and Conflict Studies adds to an understanding of this most complex and pressing human issue.

A specialization in this field can lead to further academic study in Peace and Conflict, a growing area in graduate programs in North American universities. Peace and Conflict Studies is also an appropriate preparation for the following career areas: politics and diplomacy; international relief and development; community and social services; public and private administration; counselling; law and corrections; and education.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete at least 20 courses (minimum 60 credits) including:

Courses Credits
All of
PCCN 1105 Lecture Series 1
0

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a non-credit, non-fee course. It is a one semester series of guest lectures on Peace and Conflict Studies topics. A minimum of four lectures will be offered during the semester. Requirement for the Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies.
Only offered in Fall Semester.

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POLI 1145 Peace and Conflict in the Modern World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The history of war; causes and consequences of war; the nuclear threat; the relationship of the arms race to other global problems; arms control and disarmament; Canada's role.

POLI 1145 is one of the core courses of the Peace and Conflict Studies Program.

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PCCN 1202 Conflict and Conflict Resolution
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of levels of conflict from the interpersonal to the international. The roots and dynamics of conflict; the means and history of conflict resolution; mediation and peacekeeping.

Only offered in the Spring Semester.

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Notes:
1 Attendance at this one-semester series of guest lectures on PACS topics and a journal are required.
 
One of
ENGL 1100 Reading and Writing about Literature
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1100 is writing-intensive introduction to the disciplines of literary studies. Students will examine three or four literary texts in their critical and scholarly contexts in regard to a single interdisciplinary topic and from the perspectives of at least three sub-disciplines of literary studies, such as narratology, historiography, psychoanalytic criticism, eco-criticism etc.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121) or LPI equivalent; a minimum 80% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12; an "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum "C-" in CMNS 1118; or a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; or LPI exempt essay standing (LPXE 25 - determined by Registrar and Enrolment Services).

Note: Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100. Students entering other faculties at UBC or planning to transfer to other institutions should take ENGL 1127 or 1128 instead of ENGL 1100.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1126, 1127, and 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 4 (or LET 3 with strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121) or LPI equivalent; a minimum 80% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12; or a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; or an "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127 or 1128.

Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128. Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

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Six of
ANTH 1120 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human cultures. Topics include methods, some theory and a consideration of how people obtain their living (subsistence, economy), how they live together (social structure, marriage, law etc.) and their beliefs and practices (religion, arts, rituals etc.)

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ANTH 2260 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will provide a cross-cultural survey of the nature and diversity of gender relations and their sociocultural expression. Explanations and theories of gender inequality drawn from anthropological research will be considered, as will selected areas of topical interest.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, or SOCI 1121; or permission of the instructor.

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ANTH 2270 Anthropology of Food
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Food is universally important - whether for basic sustenance and personal well-being, as a basis for defining identities, symbolizing beliefs, as a political tool or as a consequence of modern agriculture and technology. This survey course will provide an anthropological perspective and analysis of a variety of selected topics from traditional foodways to contemporary issues.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, or SOCI 1121; or permission of the instructor.

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ASIA 1120 Religions of the East 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of the origins, ideas, practices, and evolution of Hinduism, Buddhism (including Zen), Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto.

Students will receive credit for only one of ASIA 1120 and RELS 1120.

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BIOL 1118 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course pays special attention to human populations and their interactions with the environment. It is meant to be topical and at times controversial, and students are encouraged to participate in discussion, and play an active role. The course is particularly advised for those intending to pursue a non-science credential in the Environmental Studies Program.

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BIOL 1185 Human Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Human ecology is the study of relationships between people and the environment. This course will review how human relationships to the natural resources present in the area have changed over the period of human occupation. It will focus on the different relationships that a hunting/gathering culture and an industrial-based society have to their environment and use of food resources. The latter part of the course will examine contemporary land use practices and issues from a human ecological perspective. Offered as part of Fraser River Studies and Mekong River Studies.

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CNST 1120 Canadian First Nations' Concerns
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of contemporary First Nations' (Indian, Inuit and Metis) issues. Emphasis placed upon various social, political, economic, anthropological and artistic concerns in terms of the Canadian multicultural perspective.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1130 Work in Canadian Society
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An interdisciplinary study of the concept of work in Canadian society. The problems Canadians encounter in the field of work will be considered from such viewpoints as sociology, history, literature, and philosophy.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1140 Racism and Ethnic Relations in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals with racial and ethnic relations in Canada. It will emphasize social, political and economic analyses of the family, school, workplace, law and media, with special focus on British Columbia.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CHEM 1117 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course emphasizes the practical applications of chemistry in nature, living systems, and society. The role of science in shaping our view of ourselves and our surroundings will also be examined. An opportunity to do science will be provided by means of participatory lecture demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and take-home experiments.

Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1217 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a chemistry course for arts majors that focuses on biological and organic chemistry with an emphasis on environmental issues. Topics covered include toxicology, drug chemistry, food chemistry, hydrocarbons, and plastics. This course meets the laboratory science requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree.

Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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ECON 1119 Canadian Domestic and International Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course uses economic principles to describe and analyse contemporary domestic and international issues confronting the Canadian economy.

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ENVS 2410 Environmental Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to environmental law with special reference to British Columbia. Topics include how laws are formulated and revised, review of key current international, federal and provincial environmental legislation and how it operates in reality, compliance and enforcement, due diligence, and the legal responsibilities of individuals, companies and governments in environmental protection. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1127, or 1128; or permission of the coordinator.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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GEOG 1160 Development and Change in Asia-Pacific
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Pacific Rim is a term used to refer to those countries or administrative units along or near the Asian side of the Pacific Ocean. The region extends from Japan in the north to New Zealand in the south. This culturally diverse region has experienced extraordinary growth and change over the past fifty years. The forces of globalization together with improved transportation and communications have resulted in increased interdependence within the region. Diversity and interconnection are central themes of this course as we use a geographic perspective to examine the economic, social and political changes occurring in the Pacific Rim and their impact on environment and society.

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HIST 1114 Renaissance and Reformation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The development of the political thought, religion, science, economics, and culture of the Western World from the Italian Renaissance to the mid-eighteenth century. An introductory course recommended as the basis for studies in Modern History. In all fields, Western Europe was characterized by a greater secularization and this forms one of the major themes of this course.

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HIST 1115 Modern History 1900 - 1939
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Beginning with a survey of the European powers at the turn of the century, the course traces the causes of World War I, the nature of the war and the prolonged attempts to settle it. The Russian Revolution and the modernization of the Soviet Union under Stalin, the rise of Fascism in Italy and Nazism in Germany, the impact of the Great Depression are principal themes. The course ends examining the causes of the Second World War.

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HIST 1117 Outsiders: Histories of Exclusion
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates groups considered to be "outsiders" at various points in Western history. By focusing on three specific groups of outsiders and following their respective histories from the Middle Ages to the present, the causes for such ostracization can be explored, and the official as well as public responses to them can be assessed.

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HIST 2229 The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

HIST 2229 is a survey of the British Empire from its beginning until present. Between the reigns of two Elizabeths, Britain expanded from the islands off the coast of Europe to encompass territories encircling the globe. The largest expire ever known lasted three centuries in one form or other and left an enduring stamp on the independent nations that emerged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Given that the British Empire was the world's first truly global empire and gave rise to the tradition of European statesmen thinking about the world in global terms. HIST 2229 reflects current interest in globalization and world history.

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HIST 2241 The History of the Cold War I: 1946 - 1960
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Against the backdrop of World War II, this course looks at the events and circumstances which led to the division of the world into two mutually hostile camps, the communist and the capitalist, each under the aegis of the USSR and the U.S. respectively. This polarization of world politics carried with it the danger that any conflict between the two superpowers might ignite a world-wide conflict. This course examines the Chinese Civil War (1945-1949), the Berlin Blockade, the Korean War, and the launching of Sputnik (1958).

Prerequisite(s): Any History course or permission of the instructor.

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HIST 2242 The History of the Cold War II: 1960-1991
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a continuation of HIST 2241. It examines the U.S. - USSR clash in the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), the American quagmire in Vietnam, and the Star Wars concept. It follows concurrent attempts at breaking the disabling cold war attitudes and policies, attempts which proved successful only under Mikhail Gorbachev. In 1991, the Cold War was officially proclaimed dead.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 2241 or permission of the instructor. HIST 2241 and HIST 2242 may be taken concurrently.

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HIST 2245 Rights, Rock, and Revolution: The Uncivil War of the 1960s
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course charts the rise and transformation of social and political protest in Western Europe and North America since 1945. It pays particular attention to the ways in which consumer society, the welfare state, and new forms of popular culture were important in shaping student protest, youth counter culture, feminism, environmentalism and other movements and equally so in determining the growth of a populist conservative reaction in the 1980's and 1990's

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HIST 2255 History of the Modern Middle East
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys and attempts to make sense of the recent history of a region that has been torn by internal strife and has become the focus of intense international conflict. Focusing on the history of the Middle East in the twentieth century this course will examine, amongst other topics: the development of state and society in the aftermath of World War I, the emergence of the state of Israel and an enduring Arab-Israeli conflict, the role of external powers in the history of this region, and the rise of Arab nationalism and the politics of Islam. The course will culminate with a discussion of the "events of 9/11" and the beginning of a new "Gulf War" in 2003.

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HIST 2260 Environmental History
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the main currents of research and writing in the field of environmental history. Students will examine the intellectual and cultural history of ideas of nature, wilderness, environment and the human relation to it, as well as the principal ways - political, economic, social and cultural - in which humans have related to the environment.

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LAMS 2203 Conflict and Change in Latin America
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A broad survey of Latin American history beginning with the European roots and continuing with the conquest, the institutions of the Hispanic empire in America, independence, revolution, and the contemporary era.

Prerequisite(s): LAMS 1100 and 1101 recommended.

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LAMS 2206 Latin America in a Globalized World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course explores how globalization and policies of financial, trade, and investment liberalization are affecting Latin America and examines the role played by international institutions and multilateral organizations in shaping the political economy of the region. Case studies will be used to examine changes within rural and urban sectors, changing labour and migration patterns and to illustrate how Latin Americans are responding to these changes at the local, community and national levels.

Prerequisite(s): LAMS 1100 and 1101 recommended.



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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1105 Biomedical Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A consideration of selected moral problems arising in the health professions: experimentation on humans and animals, euthanasia, death, confidentiality, truth telling, abortion, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. The aim of the course is to put ourselves in a position to frame rational and informed opinions on these important matters. Classes will be organized to allow for ample discussion; readings will be drawn from medical, legal, and philosophical sources. No background in law, medicine, or philosophy is presupposed.

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PHIL 2226 Social and Political Philosophy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates the meaning of such concepts as freedom, justice, equality, power, authority and alienation, which lie at the roots of major contemporary ideologies such as liberalism, fascism, communism, socialism and anarchism.

Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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PSYC 1115 Introduction to Biological, Cognitive, and Developmental Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to research methods, biological bases of behaviour, sensation and perception, development, consciousness, learning, and memory. PSYC 1115 and PSYC 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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PSYC 1215 Introduction to Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to thinking, language, intelligence, personality, emotion, stress and health, motivation, social behavior, and psychological disorders and therapies. PSYC 1115 and 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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PSYC 2319 Psychology of the Family
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

With an emphasis on the range of experiences of the individual within intimate relationships, students examine the various psychological, social, and cultural processes which inevitably affect families. Beginning with theories of attraction, students proceed to discussion of issues related to the development of a sense of compatibility, closeness, and commitment. Definitions, types of marriage and family, the systems view of family life, communication, power, and responses to stressors are also dealt with. Students address the major changes within the family such as divorce, single parenting, and blended families.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2322 Social Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the effects of social influences on individual and group behaviour. Students explore how the social situation affects thought, feeling, and behaviour.
Topics such as social perception, social cognition, group processes, attitudes, persuasion, conformity, obedience, aggression, self-knowledge, helping, and prejudice are discussed. Other topics such as interpersonal attraction are covered at the discretion of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2323 Psychology of Health and Adjustment
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the ways in which individuals adjust to the demands of life. The course examines the nature and sources of stress as well as responses to stress. Evaluation of the self-concept in particular the personal, social, and vocational selves will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 3220 Group Dynamics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines group processes from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Lectures, small group experiential learning exercises, and participation in a major group project are used to develop a detailed understanding of group interactions as well as to provide opportunities to apply this knowledge in professional situations. Topics include group dynamics, interpersonal communication, decision-making, conflict resolution, and leadership. Additional topics, such as group dynamics in business and legal environments, may also be included.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215; or a minimum "C-" grade in BUSM 2200.

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PSYC 3230 Psychology and Culture
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students examine how cultural values shape socialization practices and how this in turn impacts the development of self and personality. Students begin by tracing the origins of culture and exploring factors that influence its spread. Students then examine how culture influences numerous psychological characteristics, including perception, thinking, intelligence, motivation, emotion, well-being, and mental health.

Students will receive credit for only one of PSYC 2332 and PSYC 3230.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in BUSM 2200; or a minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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RELS 1120 Religions of the East 2
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of the origins, ideas, practices, and evolution of Hinduism, Buddhism (including Zen), Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto.

Students will receive credit for only one of RELS 1120 and ASIA 1120.

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RELS 1220 Religions of the West
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is an introductory survey course of the West's three primary religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. This course examines the historical and social development of these religions and the various experiences of each. We will also consider modern issues and events such as the Holocaust; women, gays, lesbians and the Church. In other words, the course addresses both historical and contemporary factors that have impacted these faiths.

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SOCI 1120 Introduction to Sociology: Models and Concepts
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will be introduced to models and concepts sociologists use to think about society in terms of its maintenance and construction through everyday social interactions. Subjects that may be explored include culture and its effects; socialization; mass media; how gender is constructed and its influences; social inequality; world-views and life-chances; sexuality and society; as well as understanding crime and deviance.

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SOCI 1121 Introduction to Sociology: Structures and Processes
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will study how individuals are embedded in societal structures and processes that influence thought, feeling, and behaviour. Subjects may include race and ethnicity, family, education, religion, health and medicine, the environment, social interaction, and politics.

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SOCI 1126 Introduction to Environmental Sociology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to central sociological concepts and theories through the use of environmental examples. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the environment as a social issue, how environmental issues come to be constructed, the social structural and cultural origins of environmental problems, and how these problems can be understood in terms of the sociological perspective.

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SOCI 1130 Sociology and Aboriginal Peoples' Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological introduction to the Aboriginal life experience and the formation of Canadian society. This course examines the place of Aboriginal peoples in the structure of Canadian society including such topics as social inequality, education, health care, housing, criminal justice, work and the political order.

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SOCI 2210 Racism and Ethnic Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the social processes involved in understanding racial and ethnic minority/majority group relations in Canada and around the world.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2220 Women and Social Structure
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

An analysis of the formal and informal organizational structures and social processes, including theories of socialization and of social stratification, associated with understanding the status and objective conditions of women in Canadian society.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2222 Social Change and Globalization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An investigation of the sociological problems, theories, and ideas concerned with understanding and explaining social change. Various factors influencing social change in the contemporary global context will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2223 Industrialization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The process of industrialization, the work force, the scale of society, consensus in society, and world-wide industrialization.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2225 Crime, Punishment and the Penal System
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Crime and punishment seem to be a constant in contemporary society, but few people understand the philosophical and historical processes that created our current system of justice and penality. In this course, students explore both classical and modern theories and research to understand the development of our contemporary penal system, and then use this knowledge to conduct an in-depth sociological analysis of the current Canadian penal and justice system.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, 1121, or 1127.



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SOCI 2240 Contemporary Social Movements
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological examination of some of the major social movements, and their contesting ideologies, through which the contemporary social world is constructed. Theoretical tools will be developed to analyze movements organized around the ideas and practices of varieties of: neo-conservatism, feminism, ethno-nationalism, environmentalism, socialism, and religious fundamentalism. A cross-cultural perspective will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.



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SOCI 2250 The Sociology of the Family
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological analysis of the family including sex roles, children's rights, adoption and identity, marriage, divorce, socialization, and change in both historical communities and modern industrial societies.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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WMST 1116 Investigating Women's Realities: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to critical thinking about the lives of women. Through the lens of comparative theories and diverse perspectives, this course examines links and connections between personal and collective experiences - in the home, in the body, and on the street. Using an interdisciplinary and participatory approach, students will make sense of historical patterns and movements for social change.

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WMST 1195 Special Topics I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This number is reserved for Women's Studies courses that may be offered from time to time by:
a) College Women's Studies Faculty who may wish to present a special interest course in their field of expertise; or
b) Visiting Women's Studies Lecturers.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites will be announced in the Registration Guide and Course Schedule.

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WMST 1216 Exploring Women's Lives: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to naming and analyzing women's life experiences. Students will explore topics relevant to women's everyday lives such as body image, work and family, to develop a critical awareness of what limits and expands experiences, locally and globally, yesterday and today. This course considers how gender is constructed across age, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality. It pulls from a variety of disciplines and uses a popular education approach to shed light on issues and strategies for change.

WMST 1116 and 1216 can be taken in any order.

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WMST 1220 Women and Health
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will examine the construction of women's health from a global perspective. Students will have the opportunity to develop critical skills for exploring issues that inform women's health in Canada and in other countries throughout the world.

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WMST 1230 Women and Popular Culture
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines women's many different relationships to contemporary popular culture focusing on media such as film, television, music, magazines, popular events and trends, fan culture, and communication technologies. The course uses cultural studies and feminist theories to explore what is meant by 'pop culture' and to reflect on constructions of gender, race, class, sexuality and ability. Students will also explore how social movements, spectators, producers, and media activists resist stereotypes and create alternatives.

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WMST 2272 Women and Social Change
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This interdisciplinary course will focus on feminist theories and strategies for creating social change, concentrating on women's movements in Canada within an international context. A university transfer course.

Prerequisite(s): WMST 1116 or 1216 (preferably both).

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Notes:
1 Students will receive credit for only one of ASIA 1120 and RELS 1120.
2 Students will receive credit for only one of ASIA 1120 and RELS 1120.
 

Courses Credits
All of
PCCN 1105 Lecture Series 1
0

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a non-credit, non-fee course. It is a one semester series of guest lectures on Peace and Conflict Studies topics. A minimum of four lectures will be offered during the semester. Requirement for the Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies.
Only offered in Fall Semester.

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POLI 1145 Peace and Conflict in the Modern World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The history of war; causes and consequences of war; the nuclear threat; the relationship of the arms race to other global problems; arms control and disarmament; Canada's role.

POLI 1145 is one of the core courses of the Peace and Conflict Studies Program.

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PCCN 1202 Conflict and Conflict Resolution
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of levels of conflict from the interpersonal to the international. The roots and dynamics of conflict; the means and history of conflict resolution; mediation and peacekeeping.

Only offered in the Spring Semester.

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Notes:
1 Attendance at this one-semester series of guest lectures on PACS topics and a journal are required.
 
One of
ENGL 1100 Reading and Writing about Literature
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1100 is writing-intensive introduction to the disciplines of literary studies. Students will examine three or four literary texts in their critical and scholarly contexts in regard to a single interdisciplinary topic and from the perspectives of at least three sub-disciplines of literary studies, such as narratology, historiography, psychoanalytic criticism, eco-criticism etc.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121) or LPI equivalent; a minimum 80% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12; an "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum "C-" in CMNS 1118; or a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; or LPI exempt essay standing (LPXE 25 - determined by Registrar and Enrolment Services).

Note: Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100. Students entering other faculties at UBC or planning to transfer to other institutions should take ENGL 1127 or 1128 instead of ENGL 1100.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1126, 1127, and 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 4 (or LET 3 with strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121) or LPI equivalent; a minimum 80% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12; or a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; or an "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127 or 1128.

Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128. Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

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Six of
ANTH 1120 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human cultures. Topics include methods, some theory and a consideration of how people obtain their living (subsistence, economy), how they live together (social structure, marriage, law etc.) and their beliefs and practices (religion, arts, rituals etc.)

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ANTH 2260 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will provide a cross-cultural survey of the nature and diversity of gender relations and their sociocultural expression. Explanations and theories of gender inequality drawn from anthropological research will be considered, as will selected areas of topical interest.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, or SOCI 1121; or permission of the instructor.

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ANTH 2270 Anthropology of Food
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Food is universally important - whether for basic sustenance and personal well-being, as a basis for defining identities, symbolizing beliefs, as a political tool or as a consequence of modern agriculture and technology. This survey course will provide an anthropological perspective and analysis of a variety of selected topics from traditional foodways to contemporary issues.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, or SOCI 1121; or permission of the instructor.

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ASIA 1120 Religions of the East 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of the origins, ideas, practices, and evolution of Hinduism, Buddhism (including Zen), Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto.

Students will receive credit for only one of ASIA 1120 and RELS 1120.

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BIOL 1118 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course pays special attention to human populations and their interactions with the environment. It is meant to be topical and at times controversial, and students are encouraged to participate in discussion, and play an active role. The course is particularly advised for those intending to pursue a non-science credential in the Environmental Studies Program.

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BIOL 1185 Human Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Human ecology is the study of relationships between people and the environment. This course will review how human relationships to the natural resources present in the area have changed over the period of human occupation. It will focus on the different relationships that a hunting/gathering culture and an industrial-based society have to their environment and use of food resources. The latter part of the course will examine contemporary land use practices and issues from a human ecological perspective. Offered as part of Fraser River Studies and Mekong River Studies.

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CNST 1120 Canadian First Nations' Concerns
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of contemporary First Nations' (Indian, Inuit and Metis) issues. Emphasis placed upon various social, political, economic, anthropological and artistic concerns in terms of the Canadian multicultural perspective.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1130 Work in Canadian Society
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An interdisciplinary study of the concept of work in Canadian society. The problems Canadians encounter in the field of work will be considered from such viewpoints as sociology, history, literature, and philosophy.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1140 Racism and Ethnic Relations in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals with racial and ethnic relations in Canada. It will emphasize social, political and economic analyses of the family, school, workplace, law and media, with special focus on British Columbia.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CHEM 1117 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course emphasizes the practical applications of chemistry in nature, living systems, and society. The role of science in shaping our view of ourselves and our surroundings will also be examined. An opportunity to do science will be provided by means of participatory lecture demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and take-home experiments.

Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1217 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a chemistry course for arts majors that focuses on biological and organic chemistry with an emphasis on environmental issues. Topics covered include toxicology, drug chemistry, food chemistry, hydrocarbons, and plastics. This course meets the laboratory science requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree.

Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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ECON 1119 Canadian Domestic and International Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course uses economic principles to describe and analyse contemporary domestic and international issues confronting the Canadian economy.

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ENVS 2410 Environmental Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to environmental law with special reference to British Columbia. Topics include how laws are formulated and revised, review of key current international, federal and provincial environmental legislation and how it operates in reality, compliance and enforcement, due diligence, and the legal responsibilities of individuals, companies and governments in environmental protection. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1127, or 1128; or permission of the coordinator.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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GEOG 1160 Development and Change in Asia-Pacific
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Pacific Rim is a term used to refer to those countries or administrative units along or near the Asian side of the Pacific Ocean. The region extends from Japan in the north to New Zealand in the south. This culturally diverse region has experienced extraordinary growth and change over the past fifty years. The forces of globalization together with improved transportation and communications have resulted in increased interdependence within the region. Diversity and interconnection are central themes of this course as we use a geographic perspective to examine the economic, social and political changes occurring in the Pacific Rim and their impact on environment and society.

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HIST 1114 Renaissance and Reformation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The development of the political thought, religion, science, economics, and culture of the Western World from the Italian Renaissance to the mid-eighteenth century. An introductory course recommended as the basis for studies in Modern History. In all fields, Western Europe was characterized by a greater secularization and this forms one of the major themes of this course.

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HIST 1115 Modern History 1900 - 1939
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Beginning with a survey of the European powers at the turn of the century, the course traces the causes of World War I, the nature of the war and the prolonged attempts to settle it. The Russian Revolution and the modernization of the Soviet Union under Stalin, the rise of Fascism in Italy and Nazism in Germany, the impact of the Great Depression are principal themes. The course ends examining the causes of the Second World War.

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HIST 1117 Outsiders: Histories of Exclusion
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates groups considered to be "outsiders" at various points in Western history. By focusing on three specific groups of outsiders and following their respective histories from the Middle Ages to the present, the causes for such ostracization can be explored, and the official as well as public responses to them can be assessed.

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HIST 2229 The Rise and Fall of the British Empire
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

HIST 2229 is a survey of the British Empire from its beginning until present. Between the reigns of two Elizabeths, Britain expanded from the islands off the coast of Europe to encompass territories encircling the globe. The largest expire ever known lasted three centuries in one form or other and left an enduring stamp on the independent nations that emerged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Given that the British Empire was the world's first truly global empire and gave rise to the tradition of European statesmen thinking about the world in global terms. HIST 2229 reflects current interest in globalization and world history.

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HIST 2241 The History of the Cold War I: 1946 - 1960
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Against the backdrop of World War II, this course looks at the events and circumstances which led to the division of the world into two mutually hostile camps, the communist and the capitalist, each under the aegis of the USSR and the U.S. respectively. This polarization of world politics carried with it the danger that any conflict between the two superpowers might ignite a world-wide conflict. This course examines the Chinese Civil War (1945-1949), the Berlin Blockade, the Korean War, and the launching of Sputnik (1958).

Prerequisite(s): Any History course or permission of the instructor.

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HIST 2242 The History of the Cold War II: 1960-1991
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a continuation of HIST 2241. It examines the U.S. - USSR clash in the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), the American quagmire in Vietnam, and the Star Wars concept. It follows concurrent attempts at breaking the disabling cold war attitudes and policies, attempts which proved successful only under Mikhail Gorbachev. In 1991, the Cold War was officially proclaimed dead.

Prerequisite(s): HIST 2241 or permission of the instructor. HIST 2241 and HIST 2242 may be taken concurrently.

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HIST 2245 Rights, Rock, and Revolution: The Uncivil War of the 1960s
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course charts the rise and transformation of social and political protest in Western Europe and North America since 1945. It pays particular attention to the ways in which consumer society, the welfare state, and new forms of popular culture were important in shaping student protest, youth counter culture, feminism, environmentalism and other movements and equally so in determining the growth of a populist conservative reaction in the 1980's and 1990's

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HIST 2255 History of the Modern Middle East
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys and attempts to make sense of the recent history of a region that has been torn by internal strife and has become the focus of intense international conflict. Focusing on the history of the Middle East in the twentieth century this course will examine, amongst other topics: the development of state and society in the aftermath of World War I, the emergence of the state of Israel and an enduring Arab-Israeli conflict, the role of external powers in the history of this region, and the rise of Arab nationalism and the politics of Islam. The course will culminate with a discussion of the "events of 9/11" and the beginning of a new "Gulf War" in 2003.

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HIST 2260 Environmental History
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the main currents of research and writing in the field of environmental history. Students will examine the intellectual and cultural history of ideas of nature, wilderness, environment and the human relation to it, as well as the principal ways - political, economic, social and cultural - in which humans have related to the environment.

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LAMS 2203 Conflict and Change in Latin America
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A broad survey of Latin American history beginning with the European roots and continuing with the conquest, the institutions of the Hispanic empire in America, independence, revolution, and the contemporary era.

Prerequisite(s): LAMS 1100 and 1101 recommended.

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LAMS 2206 Latin America in a Globalized World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course explores how globalization and policies of financial, trade, and investment liberalization are affecting Latin America and examines the role played by international institutions and multilateral organizations in shaping the political economy of the region. Case studies will be used to examine changes within rural and urban sectors, changing labour and migration patterns and to illustrate how Latin Americans are responding to these changes at the local, community and national levels.

Prerequisite(s): LAMS 1100 and 1101 recommended.



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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1105 Biomedical Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A consideration of selected moral problems arising in the health professions: experimentation on humans and animals, euthanasia, death, confidentiality, truth telling, abortion, and the allocation of scarce medical resources. The aim of the course is to put ourselves in a position to frame rational and informed opinions on these important matters. Classes will be organized to allow for ample discussion; readings will be drawn from medical, legal, and philosophical sources. No background in law, medicine, or philosophy is presupposed.

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PHIL 2226 Social and Political Philosophy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates the meaning of such concepts as freedom, justice, equality, power, authority and alienation, which lie at the roots of major contemporary ideologies such as liberalism, fascism, communism, socialism and anarchism.

Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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PSYC 1115 Introduction to Biological, Cognitive, and Developmental Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to research methods, biological bases of behaviour, sensation and perception, development, consciousness, learning, and memory. PSYC 1115 and PSYC 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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PSYC 1215 Introduction to Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to thinking, language, intelligence, personality, emotion, stress and health, motivation, social behavior, and psychological disorders and therapies. PSYC 1115 and 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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PSYC 2319 Psychology of the Family
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

With an emphasis on the range of experiences of the individual within intimate relationships, students examine the various psychological, social, and cultural processes which inevitably affect families. Beginning with theories of attraction, students proceed to discussion of issues related to the development of a sense of compatibility, closeness, and commitment. Definitions, types of marriage and family, the systems view of family life, communication, power, and responses to stressors are also dealt with. Students address the major changes within the family such as divorce, single parenting, and blended families.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2322 Social Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the effects of social influences on individual and group behaviour. Students explore how the social situation affects thought, feeling, and behaviour.
Topics such as social perception, social cognition, group processes, attitudes, persuasion, conformity, obedience, aggression, self-knowledge, helping, and prejudice are discussed. Other topics such as interpersonal attraction are covered at the discretion of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2323 Psychology of Health and Adjustment
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the ways in which individuals adjust to the demands of life. The course examines the nature and sources of stress as well as responses to stress. Evaluation of the self-concept in particular the personal, social, and vocational selves will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 3220 Group Dynamics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines group processes from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Lectures, small group experiential learning exercises, and participation in a major group project are used to develop a detailed understanding of group interactions as well as to provide opportunities to apply this knowledge in professional situations. Topics include group dynamics, interpersonal communication, decision-making, conflict resolution, and leadership. Additional topics, such as group dynamics in business and legal environments, may also be included.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215; or a minimum "C-" grade in BUSM 2200.

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PSYC 3240 The Psychology of Creativity
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

What is the process underlying creativity and what are the characteristics of creative people? These questions have occupied the interests of researchers and practitioners from a wide variety of subdisciplines in psychology. Students will learn what psychological research can tell us about how creativity can be defined, how it develops, and how it manifests itself across various cultures and content domains. Grounded in research, PSYC 3240 will also have a strong applied emphasis, encouraging students to explore the creative process through discussion and small group experiential learning exercises.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215; or a minimum "C-" grade in BUSM 2200.

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RELS 1120 Religions of the East 2
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of the origins, ideas, practices, and evolution of Hinduism, Buddhism (including Zen), Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto.

Students will receive credit for only one of RELS 1120 and ASIA 1120.

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RELS 1220 Religions of the West
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is an introductory survey course of the West's three primary religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. This course examines the historical and social development of these religions and the various experiences of each. We will also consider modern issues and events such as the Holocaust; women, gays, lesbians and the Church. In other words, the course addresses both historical and contemporary factors that have impacted these faiths.

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SOCI 1120 Introduction to Sociology: Models and Concepts
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will be introduced to models and concepts sociologists use to think about society in terms of its maintenance and construction through everyday social interactions. Subjects that may be explored include culture and its effects; socialization; mass media; how gender is constructed and its influences; social inequality; world-views and life-chances; sexuality and society; as well as understanding crime and deviance.

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SOCI 1121 Introduction to Sociology: Structures and Processes
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will study how individuals are embedded in societal structures and processes that influence thought, feeling, and behaviour. Subjects may include race and ethnicity, family, education, religion, health and medicine, the environment, social interaction, and politics.

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SOCI 1126 Introduction to Environmental Sociology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to central sociological concepts and theories through the use of environmental examples. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the environment as a social issue, how environmental issues come to be constructed, the social structural and cultural origins of environmental problems, and how these problems can be understood in terms of the sociological perspective.

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SOCI 1130 Sociology and Aboriginal Peoples' Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological introduction to the Aboriginal life experience and the formation of Canadian society. This course examines the place of Aboriginal peoples in the structure of Canadian society including such topics as social inequality, education, health care, housing, criminal justice, work and the political order.

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SOCI 2210 Racism and Ethnic Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the social processes involved in understanding racial and ethnic minority/majority group relations in Canada and around the world.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2220 Women and Social Structure
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

An analysis of the formal and informal organizational structures and social processes, including theories of socialization and of social stratification, associated with understanding the status and objective conditions of women in Canadian society.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2222 Social Change and Globalization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An investigation of the sociological problems, theories, and ideas concerned with understanding and explaining social change. Various factors influencing social change in the contemporary global context will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2223 Industrialization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The process of industrialization, the work force, the scale of society, consensus in society, and world-wide industrialization.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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SOCI 2225 Crime, Punishment and the Penal System
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Crime and punishment seem to be a constant in contemporary society, but few people understand the philosophical and historical processes that created our current system of justice and penality. In this course, students explore both classical and modern theories and research to understand the development of our contemporary penal system, and then use this knowledge to conduct an in-depth sociological analysis of the current Canadian penal and justice system.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, 1121, or 1127.



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SOCI 2240 Contemporary Social Movements
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological examination of some of the major social movements, and their contesting ideologies, through which the contemporary social world is constructed. Theoretical tools will be developed to analyze movements organized around the ideas and practices of varieties of: neo-conservatism, feminism, ethno-nationalism, environmentalism, socialism, and religious fundamentalism. A cross-cultural perspective will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.



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SOCI 2250 The Sociology of the Family
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological analysis of the family including sex roles, children's rights, adoption and identity, marriage, divorce, socialization, and change in both historical communities and modern industrial societies.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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WMST 1116 Investigating Women's Realities: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to critical thinking about the lives of women. Through the lens of comparative theories and diverse perspectives, this course examines links and connections between personal and collective experiences - in the home, in the body, and on the street. Using an interdisciplinary and participatory approach, students will make sense of historical patterns and movements for social change.

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WMST 1195 Special Topics I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This number is reserved for Women's Studies courses that may be offered from time to time by:
a) College Women's Studies Faculty who may wish to present a special interest course in their field of expertise; or
b) Visiting Women's Studies Lecturers.

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites will be announced in the Registration Guide and Course Schedule.

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WMST 1216 Exploring Women's Lives: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to naming and analyzing women's life experiences. Students will explore topics relevant to women's everyday lives such as body image, work and family, to develop a critical awareness of what limits and expands experiences, locally and globally, yesterday and today. This course considers how gender is constructed across age, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality. It pulls from a variety of disciplines and uses a popular education approach to shed light on issues and strategies for change.

WMST 1116 and 1216 can be taken in any order.

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WMST 1220 Women and Health
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will examine the construction of women's health from a global perspective. Students will have the opportunity to develop critical skills for exploring issues that inform women's health in Canada and in other countries throughout the world.

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WMST 1230 Women and Popular Culture
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines women's many different relationships to contemporary popular culture focusing on media such as film, television, music, magazines, popular events and trends, fan culture, and communication technologies. The course uses cultural studies and feminist theories to explore what is meant by 'pop culture' and to reflect on constructions of gender, race, class, sexuality and ability. Students will also explore how social movements, spectators, producers, and media activists resist stereotypes and create alternatives.

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WMST 2272 Women and Social Change
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This interdisciplinary course will focus on feminist theories and strategies for creating social change, concentrating on women's movements in Canada within an international context. A university transfer course.

Prerequisite(s): WMST 1116 or 1216 (preferably both).

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Any two Political Science (POLI 1100 and POLI 1140 highly recommended).

* No more than two courses from any one subject area.
 
1 Students will receive credit for only one of ASIA 1120 and RELS 1120.
2 Students will receive credit for only one of ASIA 1120 and RELS 1120.