Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
GEOG 1180 Physical Geography: Meteorology, Climatology and Biogeography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course is an introduction to the studies of the atmosphere (meteorology), climate (climatology) and vegetation distribution (biogeography). Topics covered include atmospheric processes, local and global weather, air pollution, world climates, plant-climate interactions, urban climates, past climates and future climates. This is a laboratory science course. The lab work provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a series of applied and practical problems. Students will also learn how to make weather observations.

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Two of
GEOG 1110 Introduction to Human Geography 1
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce students to the discipline of human geography. Students will be exposed to the major research traditions in human geography including: population, cultural, political, economic, urban and regional geography, amongst other topics. Throughout the course Vancouver resources and examples will be used to illustrate many of the themes.Students will receive credit for only one of GEOG 1110 and 1170.

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GEOG 1120 Regional Geography of Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Regional Geography of Canada explores the similarities and differences among the regions of our country. Students will gain an understanding of the landscape, the environment and the economy as we survey Canada from Long Beach to Labrador and from Baffin Island to Burlington. Students will examine a range of social issues that provide insight into the nature of Canada.

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GEOG 1130 Urban Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the evolution of the city from the Greco-Roman period to the present. The course topics include the internal structure of the city; industrial, commercial and residential land use; transportation and the planning of the urban environment. An application of the concepts to Vancouver and the surrounding area forms the basis of practical and interactive planning focus groups.

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GEOG 1150 Geography of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

British Columbia is a richly endowed and diverse province. In this course the province's human and physical geography is explored. Topics covered include regions, climate, natural hazards, geomorphology, biogeography, history, resource development, Aboriginal issues, cultural diversity, and urbanization. Students will actively engage in discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and solutions. This course is of interest to students who would like to have a better understanding of British Columbia and its role within Canada and the world.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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GEOG 1160 Development and Change in Asia-Pacific
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Pacific Rim is a term used to refer to those countries or administrative units along or near the Asian side of the Pacific Ocean. The region extends from Japan in the north to New Zealand in the south. This culturally diverse region has experienced extraordinary growth and change over the past fifty years. The forces of globalization together with improved transportation and communications have resulted in increased interdependence within the region. Diversity and interconnection are central themes of this course as we use a geographic perspective to examine the economic, social and political changes occurring in the Pacific Rim and their impact on environment and society.

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Notes:
1 Students who have previously completed GEOG 1170 may use this course in place of the GEOG 1110 requirement.
 
One of
GEOG 1190 Physical Geography: Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to the dynamic forces and processes responsible for shaping the surface of the earth and the development of landforms (geomorphology). Topics covered include the internal structure of the earth; plate tectonics; volcanism; earthquakes; mountain building; the effects of water, ice and wind on the surface of the earth and the development and distribution of soils. This is a laboratory science course. Weekly labs teach skills in the use of topographic maps, air photo interpretation and terrain analysis. There will be a field trip to a local area of interest.

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GEOL 1110 Introduction to Geology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course provides an introduction to physical geology. Topics include the origin and structure of the earth, the nature of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, deformation of the earth's crust, seismic activity, geomorphic processes and the development of landforms. This is a laboratory science course with science credit. Labs will emphasise rock and mineral identification techniques.

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Three of
GEOG 2155 Sustainable Resource and Environmental Management
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students examine the sustainable use and management of environmental resources. Subjects that may be explored include indigenous rights and access to resources, environmental impact assessment, resource conflicts, local and indigenous knowledge, methods of environmental management, gender and resources, and the roles and responsibilities of governmental and non-governmental decision-makers. Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2250, 2270, ENVS 2100, or 2390; or permission of the department.

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GEOG 2210 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A laboratory science course that introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students explore the theoretical underpinnings of geographical information science and apply this knowledge to the creation of a map portfolio through labs and a major project. Topics covered include spatial measurement, geodesy, map projections, cartography, and remote sensing. In the lab component, students will utilize GIS software, through various applications and commands, to analyze applied problems in geographically related phenomena.This course is recommended to students interested in using spatial data collection and analysis to solve applied problems within their discipline.

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GEOG 2230 Contemporary Canadian Urban Life
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Explores the unique character of Canadian cities. Topics include transportation, housing, population growth and suburban development.Prerequisite(s): Any one of GEOG 1100, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 1110, 2210, 2240, 2270, or another Social Science alternative with the permission of instructor or department.

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GEOG 2250 Economic Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of economic geography and examines the changing geography or 'global shift' of economic activity within the contemporary world economy. The course examines the economic, political, and social relations that are part of modern market economies, as well as the role played by key economic actors such as business, government, labour, and consumers. The significance of changing technology over time and space, and issues related to development and globalization are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): Any one of GEOG 1100, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 1110, 2210, 2270 or another Social Science alternative with the permission of the instructor.

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GEOG 2270 Cultural Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Cultural Geography is concerned with making sense of people and the places they occupy through the analysis and understanding of cultural processes, cultural landscapes, and cultural identities.Prerequisite(s): One of GEOG 1100, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 1110, 2210 or 2250; LAMS 1100 or 1101; or other Social Science alternative with the permission of the instructor.

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GEOG 2275 Applied Human Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this applied course, students work as part of the CityStudio Campus Course Network on large-scale projects associated with the City of Vancouver's Healthy City Strategy, Greenest City 2020 Action Plan, or independent projects focused on urban social sustainability. Through experiential learning, students analyze existing problems, use ideas grounded in established geographical principles and theory, and seek to innovate, devise, and implement real-world solutions. Students engage in research and develop critical thinking, problem solving, project management, structured teamwork, and design skills.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2155, 2210, 2230, 2250, 2270, SOCI 1120, 1121, ANTH 1120, or ENVS 2100.

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GEOG 2280 Weather, Climate and Climate Change
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Building upon the basic principles introduced in GEOG 1180, this course uses an integrated approach to study physical and dynamic climatology, meteorology, and climate change. GEOG 2280 is a laboratory science course with both a lecture and a laboratory component. Topics covered include atmospheric composition, energy and moisture; global, synoptic, and local scale circulations; ocean-atmosphere interactions; climate change, and modeling of the climate system. Lab assignments allow students to develop skills in the collections, analysis, and interpretation of climate data. Working in small groups, students also monitor and analyze local weather over the duration of the course.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1180 or permission of the instructor.

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GEOG 2290 Advanced Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Advanced studies of the processes that affect development of natural landforms and landscapes. GEOG 2290 is a laboratory science course with both lecture and laboratory sections. Topics covered include fluvial, coastal, desert glacial and periglacial processes, natural weathering phenomena and soil profile development. Topics of local interest include mass movement, earthquake activity, volcanism and natural hazards associated with the Greater Vancouver - Fraser River Valley region. Weekly labs will introduce methods of analysis with case studies as means to teach applications in environmental assessment and interpretation. Field trips will focus on local landscape development.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110 or with the permission of the instructor.

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One of
ENGL 1100 Reading and Writing about Literature
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1100 is writing-intensive introduction to the disciplines of literary studies. Students will examine three or four literary texts in their critical and scholarly contexts in regard to a single interdisciplinary topic and from the perspectives of at least three sub-disciplines of literary studies, such as narratology, historiography, psychoanalytic criticism, eco-criticism etc.Note: Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100. Students entering other faculties at UBC or planning to transfer to other institutions should take ENGL 1127 or 1128 instead of ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127 or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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