Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

Environmental Studies is an interdisciplinary program offering students the opportunity to obtain a solid grasp of the physical principles governing the form and function of the earth and the social aspects affecting the nature of human impact on the environment. Program participants will also gain critical thinking skills, analytical ability, a deeper understanding of environmental issues, and a sense of local and global awareness, preparing them to address complex environmental issues.

All courses have university-transfer credit providing students with the option of further study should they wish to obtain a university degree in Environmental Studies or other arts and science disciplines. Block transfer agreements with BC universities allow entry into the third year of certain programs.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
ENVS 1105 Environmental Studies Program Seminar
0

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A non-credit, non-fee course consisting of a series of seminars, films, and speakers focusing on the environment. This course is intended to provide an introduction to environmental issues and the environmental studies program. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.

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ENVS 2100 Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio introduces local urban environmental topics through which the student develops research, communication, project management and group skills. This cross-disciplinary course will inform and challenge students' perspectives of their world, while providing the opportunity to identify problems and develop solutions. Students' work will be exhibited through a project affiliated with CityStudio.Participation in field trips is required. This core course in the Environmental Studies Program is open to students in other disciplines.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the instructor or Environmental Studies coordinator.

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ENVS 2410 Environmental Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to environmental law with special reference to British Columbia. Topics include how laws are formulated and revised, review of key current international, federal and provincial environmental legislation and how it operates in reality, compliance and enforcement, due diligence, and the legal responsibilities of individuals, companies and governments in environmental protection. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the coordinator.

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ENVS 2470 Field School
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A practical field methods course, including lectures (Spring Semester) and a mandatory, off-campus, field component shortly after the final examinations period (end of semester). Team taught, the course will feature techniques used for terrain analysis, mapping, inventory of ecosystems, water quality testing, and report writing. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): Any two of the following: BIOL 1115, BIOL 1215, CHEM 1117, CHEM 1217, CHEM 1120, GEOG 1155, either GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110; or permission of the environmental studies coordinator.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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Nine of
ABST 1206 Physical Resources and Aboriginal People
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course will critically examine and explore the relationship between Aboriginal people and physical resources. Both Aboriginal and Western perspectives will be reviewed and discussed regarding the following physical resources: land and environment, water, forestry, fisheries, minerals, agriculture, wildlife management, mining and energy. For each of the preceding, the Aboriginal perspective will be discussed and followed by a full description of the resource and the relevant government legislation and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Case studies and the laboratory will support the student. This course will be of interest to any one interested in natural resources.

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ABST 1207 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge and Contemporary Science
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This science course will integrate Aboriginal Traditional knowledge with the basic elements of the physical and biological sciences. Contemporary science will be examined and compared with Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge. The Aboriginal concepts of nature, governance, origin accounts, knowledge systems, and stewardship issues, amongst other topics, will be explored. The course will be taught from an Aboriginal perspective that is respectful of culture and Traditional Knowledge, yet attentive of the realities of contemporary science.

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ABST 2230 Aboriginal Community Development
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on Aboriginal community development and the needs of Aboriginal communities now and in the future. Strategies for success will be examined as Aboriginal communities move toward self-reliance. Case studies will be used to explore course concepts.

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ABST 2240 Urban Aboriginal Strategies
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Since 1951 there has been a rapid growth in the number of First Nations Canadians living in the city. Despite this there has been little academic attention given to the systemic study of Canadian Aboriginal peoples living in urban centres. This course introduces students to the problems and prospects faced by Canadian First Nations people in urban environments. Topics include migration, housing, employment, and a critical examination of government policy regarding acculturation and assimilation.

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ANTH 1120 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human cultures. Topics include methods, some theory and a consideration of how people obtain their living (subsistence, economy), how they live together (social structure, marriage, law etc.) and their beliefs and practices (religion, arts, rituals etc.)

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ANTH 1132 Introduction to Archaeology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human prehistory; an examination of the evidence for human cultural evolution; and a consideration of the various motives, methods and techniques that have been involved in reconstructing past cultures.

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ANTH 1180 Aboriginal Cultures of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the origins and development of Interior and Coastal peoples. This survey course will consider the earliest cultural evidence, the development of regional diversity and the indigenous cultures at the time of contact.

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Students should consult with the Langara College Calendar and the Applied Planning Co-ordinator about the prerequisites for APPL 2310.
 
CMNS 1115 Interpersonal Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Interpersonal communications theory put into practice in exercises, group and individual projects that cover small group dynamics, interviews, and oral presentations. Graded S/U.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 2; LETN 02; a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; IELTS 6.5 or equivalent; or Duolingo 110.

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CMNS 1118 Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Training in writing skills, with emphasis on business writing in a career context. Writing projects include: memos, letters, reports, resumes, and employment correspondence.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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CMNS 2228 Advanced Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students in CMNS 2228 will learn advanced written communication skills, including both business and technical writing. Students will learn and practice advanced editing skills and writing for the Web.Prerequisite(s): One of CMNS 1118, ENGL 1123, 1127, or ENGL 1140, or permission of the English Department.

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ECON 1110 Urban and Rural Economic Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course uses economic principles to describe and analyze economic issues confronting urban and rural areas, such as poverty, housing, transportation, municipal government, urban sprawl, and quality of life.

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ECON 1220 Principles of Microeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory concepts; the market system; price determination; demand and utility; competitive supply; cost analysis; market structures; equilibrium of the firm; pricing of factor inputs; land rents; wages; interest and capital.

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ECON 1221 Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory macroeconomic concepts; circular flow of income and product; national income; equilibrium level of domestic income; fiscal policy; money and banking; international trade; inflation and unemployment.

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GEOG 2155 Sustainable Resource and Environmental Management
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students examine the sustainable use and management of environmental resources. Subjects that may be explored include indigenous rights and access to resources, environmental impact assessment, resource conflicts, local and indigenous knowledge, methods of environmental management, gender and resources, and the roles and responsibilities of governmental and non-governmental decision-makers. Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2250, 2270, ENVS 2100, or 2390; or permission of the department.

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GEOG 2230 Contemporary Canadian Urban Life
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Explores the unique character of Canadian cities. Topics include transportation, housing, population growth, and suburban development.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2210, 2240, or 2270; or another social science course with permission of the instructor or department.

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GEOG 2250 Economic Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of economic geography and examines the changing geography or 'global shift' of economic activity within the contemporary world economy. The course examines the economic, political, and social relations that are part of modern market economies, as well as the role played by key economic actors such as business, government, labour, and consumers. The significance of changing technology over time and space, and issues related to development and globalization are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2210, or 2270; or another social science course with permission of the instructor.

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HIST 2215 History of Urban Growth in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines how and why Canadian cities and towns took the shape they did. Central to this understanding is an investigation of early urban forms in Canada and their antecedent and contemporary forms in Europe and the U.S. The course will explore the diverse social, political, economic, intellectual, religious, technological, topographical, and aesthetic elements which combined to shape Canadian cities and towns and influenced the path of urban growth.

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HIST 2217 Modern British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A topical survey of British Columbia history since Confederation in 1871 with special attention to the structure of B.C.'s economy, the ethnic make-up of the province, First Nations' issues, industrial relations, urbanization, environmental questions and provincial politics. In addition, this course provides an introduction to historical research methods.

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HIST 2260 Environmental History
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the main currents of research and writing in the field of environmental history. Students will examine the intellectual and cultural history of ideas of nature, wilderness, environment and the human relation to it, as well as the principal ways - political, economic, social and cultural - in which humans have related to the environment.

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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1104 Critical Thinking
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Thinking critically means knowing how to support your beliefs and actions with good reasons and how to evaluate reasons given by others. In this course, you will learn to distinguish good from bad arguments as they occur in everyday discussions, including in the news media, political campaigns, advertising, and other contexts. The goal is to help you to cultivate a solid habit of going through life as a critical thinker, which should lead to better reasoned decision-making, rather than decisions based on unexamined opinions, impulse, prejudice, or social pressure. Students will be taught, through extensive examples, how to understand, criticize, and construct arguments, and how to recognize common errors in reasoning.ESL students who have difficulty reading or writing English may find this course challenging. They are encouraged to discuss their participation in this course with the instructor.

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PHIL 1120 Environmental Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce students to the moral issues associated with human interaction with our environment and provide them with the methodology for critically assessing these issues. Topics include: Are animals, plants, and trees entitled to moral consideration? If so, how much and why? How do we fairly distribute the burdens of environmental stewardship between nations and between generations? Do we owe any moral obligations to future generations? Are groups, like species and ecosystems, deserving of moral consideration? Must we promote sustainability? When, if ever, may we engage in acts of violence in order to protect animals and/or the ecosystem?

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PHIL 2202 Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A consideration of such questions as: When can we hold an individual morally responsible for his actions? What is freedom? What are my obligations to my community? From the courses of action open to me, what ought I to do? What is the nature of the good? The course will consider the views of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Sartre.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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PHIL 2210 Contemporary Moral Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of important moral controversies in such fields as social justice, international relations, multiculturalism, environmental ethics, corporate responsibility and personal relationships. The focus is on learning to reach balanced moral decisions, supported by sound philosophical reasoning.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year philosophy course, or consent of the instructor.

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POLI 1119 Canadian Politics and Government
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course deals with the origins and structure of Canadian government and analyses the social and political forces which shape our current political system. Topics include Parliament, the PM and Cabinet, political parties, Quebec nationalism, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

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POLI 1140 Introduction to International Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the politics of world society, its historical development, the major forms of analysis of global political structures and foreign policies, and contemporary security problems.

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POLI 1250 Politics in the Developing Nations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the political, social and economic forces at work in the "Third World," sometimes called the "developing" or "majority" world (e.g., Cuba, South Africa, Indonesia). The countries covered vary with the instructor.

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POLI 2229 Introduction to Urban Politics
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A general introduction to Canadian local politics and government, with specific focus on Vancouver and the British Columbia case. Topics will include electoral systems, party politics, local pressure groups, the role of bureaucracy, regional government and the relationship of cities to provincial and federal administrations.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in POLI 1100, 1119, or 2250; or permission of the instructor.

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POLI 2240 International Political Economy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the elements of international political economics including trade, monetary issues, trans-national corporations, poverty, dependency, development, and the environment. Any previous Political Science or Economics course is helpful.

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POLI 2245 Canadian International Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This general introduction to a variety of topics in Canadian international relations (defence concerns, foreign policy, and international economics) will use competing analyses to explain Canadian actions. Examples will include NATO, NORAD, US-Canada relations, peacekeeping, policy initiatives, the UN, WTO, NAFTA, and the role of Canadian civil society. Historical context and current concerns will be emphasized.Prerequisite(s): POLI 1119 or POLI 1140 or POLI 1145.

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SOCI 1126 Introduction to Environmental Sociology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to central sociological concepts and theories through the use of environmental examples. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the environment as a social issue, how environmental issues come to be constructed, the social structural and cultural origins of environmental problems, and how these problems can be understood in terms of the sociological perspective.

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SOCI 2240 Contemporary Social Movements
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological examination of some of the major social movements, and their contesting ideologies, through which the contemporary social world is constructed. Theoretical tools will be developed to analyze movements organized around the ideas and practices of varieties of: neo-conservatism, feminism, ethno-nationalism, environmentalism, socialism, and religious fundamentalism. A cross-cultural perspective will be emphasized.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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Note: When choosing courses, students must consult the Associate of Arts general requirements to ensure they choose a selection of courses that meet these requirements.
 
Four of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3; LEAP 8; a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CMNS 1115, ENGL 1120, 1123, or 1128; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; and One of the following prerequisite combinations: 1) A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1218, or 1175; or 2) A minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11, Anatomy and Physiology 12, or equivalent; and a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217.

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BIOL 1118 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course pays special attention to human populations and their interactions with the environment. It is meant to be topical and at times controversial, and students are encouraged to participate in discussion, and play an active role. The course is particularly advised for those intending to pursue a non-science credential in the Environmental Studies Program.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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BIOL 1218 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

After developing a foundation in ecological theory, students examine issues in conservation biology. Major topics include loss of biodiversity, habitat fragmentation, conservation genetics, wildlife management, and human ecology. Local field trips are required as part of the lab portion of the course. This course is primarily for non-science majors interested in taking a biology course that emphasizes environmental issues.

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CHEM 1117 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course emphasizes the practical applications of chemistry in nature, living systems, and society. The role of science in shaping our view of ourselves and our surroundings will also be examined. An opportunity to do science will be provided by means of participatory lecture demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and take-home experiments.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1121 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course constitutes a first year course in general college chemistry. Topics include: quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure, and chemistry in society. Students may obtain credit for only one of: CHEM 1120 OR CHEM 1121. These courses have the same learning outcomes but differ in their delivery mode. CHEM 1121 and CHEM 1221 will run with 100% online lectures and 100% online synchronous labs.Note: Students intending to use this course for transfer to a university should be aware that this course is not intended to transfer to UBC Vancouver as CHEM 121.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in CHEM 1118 or a minimum "B" grade in Chemistry 12; and a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12, or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for three years.

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CHEM 1217 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a chemistry course for arts majors that focuses on biological and organic chemistry with an emphasis on environmental issues. Topics covered include toxicology, drug chemistry, food chemistry, hydrocarbons, and plastics. This course meets the laboratory science requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1221 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course constitutes the second half of a first year course in general college chemistry. Topics include: solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity. Students may obtain credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221. These courses have the same learning outcomes but differ in their delivery mode. CHEM 1121 and 1221 will run with 100% online lectures and 100% online synchronous labs.Note: Students intending to use this course for transfer to a university should be aware that this course is not intended to transfer to UBC Vancouver as CHEM 123.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in CHEM 1120 or 1121; and a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12, or MDT 75. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for three years.

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GEOG 1180 Physical Geography: Meteorology, Climatology and Biogeography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course is an introduction to the studies of the atmosphere (meteorology), climate (climatology) and vegetation distribution (biogeography). Topics covered include atmospheric processes, local and global weather, air pollution, world climates, plant-climate interactions, urban climates, past climates and future climates. This is a laboratory science course. The lab work provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a series of applied and practical problems. Students will also learn how to make weather observations.

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GEOG 1190 Physical Geography: Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to the dynamic forces and processes responsible for shaping the surface of the earth and the development of landforms (geomorphology). Topics covered include the internal structure of the earth; plate tectonics; volcanism; earthquakes; mountain building; the effects of water, ice and wind on the surface of the earth and the development and distribution of soils. This is a laboratory science course. Weekly labs teach skills in the use of topographic maps, air photo interpretation and terrain analysis. There will be a field trip to a local area of interest.

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GEOL 1110 Introduction to Geology 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course provides an introduction to physical geology. Topics include the origin and structure of the earth, the nature of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, deformation of the earth's crust, seismic activity, geomorphic processes and the development of landforms. This is a laboratory science course with science credit. Labs will emphasise rock and mineral identification techniques.

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Notes:
1 At some institutions, GEOG 1190 and GEOL1110 are considered identical courses. Students who take both GEOG 1190 and GEOL1110 may not receive transfer credit for both courses. Please consult the BCCAT transfer guide or Langara Geography Department.
 
One of
MATH, CPSC or STAT (minimum 3 credits)
3

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Science Degree, students must complete a minimum of 62 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3; LEAP 8; a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CMNS 1115, ENGL 1120, 1123, or 1128; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; and One of the following prerequisite combinations: 1) A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1218, or 1175; or 2) A minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11, Anatomy and Physiology 12, or equivalent; and a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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ENVS 1105 Environmental Studies Program Seminar
0

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A non-credit, non-fee course consisting of a series of seminars, films, and speakers focusing on the environment. This course is intended to provide an introduction to environmental issues and the environmental studies program. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.

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ENVS 2100 Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio introduces local urban environmental topics through which the student develops research, communication, project management and group skills. This cross-disciplinary course will inform and challenge students' perspectives of their world, while providing the opportunity to identify problems and develop solutions. Students' work will be exhibited through a project affiliated with CityStudio.Participation in field trips is required. This core course in the Environmental Studies Program is open to students in other disciplines.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the instructor or Environmental Studies coordinator.

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ENVS 2410 Environmental Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to environmental law with special reference to British Columbia. Topics include how laws are formulated and revised, review of key current international, federal and provincial environmental legislation and how it operates in reality, compliance and enforcement, due diligence, and the legal responsibilities of individuals, companies and governments in environmental protection. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the coordinator.

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ENVS 2470 Field School
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A practical field methods course, including lectures (Spring Semester) and a mandatory, off-campus, field component shortly after the final examinations period (end of semester). Team taught, the course will feature techniques used for terrain analysis, mapping, inventory of ecosystems, water quality testing, and report writing. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): Any two of the following: BIOL 1115, BIOL 1215, CHEM 1117, CHEM 1217, CHEM 1120, GEOG 1155, either GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110; or permission of the environmental studies coordinator.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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GEOG 1180 Physical Geography: Meteorology, Climatology and Biogeography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course is an introduction to the studies of the atmosphere (meteorology), climate (climatology) and vegetation distribution (biogeography). Topics covered include atmospheric processes, local and global weather, air pollution, world climates, plant-climate interactions, urban climates, past climates and future climates. This is a laboratory science course. The lab work provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a series of applied and practical problems. Students will also learn how to make weather observations.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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One of
GEOL 1110 Introduction to Geology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course provides an introduction to physical geology. Topics include the origin and structure of the earth, the nature of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, deformation of the earth's crust, seismic activity, geomorphic processes and the development of landforms. This is a laboratory science course with science credit. Labs will emphasise rock and mineral identification techniques.

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GEOG 1190 Physical Geography: Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to the dynamic forces and processes responsible for shaping the surface of the earth and the development of landforms (geomorphology). Topics covered include the internal structure of the earth; plate tectonics; volcanism; earthquakes; mountain building; the effects of water, ice and wind on the surface of the earth and the development and distribution of soils. This is a laboratory science course. Weekly labs teach skills in the use of topographic maps, air photo interpretation and terrain analysis. There will be a field trip to a local area of interest.

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Notes:
* At some institutions, GEOG 1190 and GEOL1110 are considered identical courses. Students who take both GEOG 1190 and GEOL1110 may not receive transfer credit for both courses. Please consult the BCCAT transfer guide or Langara Geography Department.
 
Five of
BIOL 2286 Ecology of the Mekong River
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 3.0

An introductory, science-transfer ecology course taught mostly in Thailand. The course will emphasize terrestrial and fresh water ecosystems using examples from the Mekong River Basin.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1115 and BIOL 1215 or equivalent with a minimum "C-" grade.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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CHEM 2222 Analytical Chemistry
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 4.0

Introduction to qualitative and quantitative chemical analytical techniques and statistical analysis of data.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2250 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This second-year level Chemistry course builds on a first-year knowledge of chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and thermodynamics. This course is required for second-year biology and is useful in a variety of fields such as agriculture, medicine and earth sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 2210 and 2250.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 and one of the following: MATH 1171, 1174, 1253, or the combination of MATH 1173 and 1183. MATH 1271 or the combination of MATH 1273 and 1283 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2316 Organic Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds including hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds; and an introduction to reaction mechanisms, to stereochemistry and to the use of spectroscopy in organic chemistry.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2416 Organic Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include aromatic compounds, alcohols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbonylic acids, amines, and amino acids. Bio-organic systems may also be covered.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2316 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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GEOG 2210 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A laboratory science course that introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students explore the theoretical underpinnings of geographical information science and apply this knowledge to the creation of a map portfolio through labs and a major project. Topics covered include spatial measurement, geodesy, map projections, cartography, and remote sensing. In the lab component, students will utilize GIS software, through various applications and commands, to analyze applied problems in geographically related phenomena.This course is recommended to students interested in using spatial data collection and analysis to solve applied problems within their discipline.

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GEOG 2290 Advanced Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Advanced studies of the processes that affect development of natural landforms and landscapes. GEOG 2290 is a laboratory science course with both lecture and laboratory sections. Topics covered include fluvial, coastal, desert glacial and periglacial processes, natural weathering phenomena and soil profile development. Topics of local interest include mass movement, earthquake activity, volcanism and natural hazards associated with the Greater Vancouver - Fraser River Valley region. Weekly labs will introduce methods of analysis with case studies as means to teach applications in environmental assessment and interpretation. Field trips will focus on local landscape development.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110 or with the permission of the instructor.

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GEOL 2207 Natural Hazards
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to catastrophic natural events including earthquakes, volcanoes, mass movement, severe weather, fire, and river and coastal flooding. Also presented are climate change, sea-level fluctuation and ground water pollution, which represent other seemingly less dramatic, but no less important, hazardous conditions. Emphasis is placed on how these events impact on the earth's natural environment and how they influence and are influenced by human activity including efforts at predictions, preventions, and mitigation of large and small scale events.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110.

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Note: When choosing courses, students must consult the Associate of Science general requirements to ensure they choose a selection of courses that meet these requirements.
 
Two of
MATH (minimum 6 credits) which shall include at least one course in calculus (3 credits).
6

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Diploma in Arts and Science, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
ENVS 1105 Environmental Studies Program Seminar
0

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A non-credit, non-fee course consisting of a series of seminars, films, and speakers focusing on the environment. This course is intended to provide an introduction to environmental issues and the environmental studies program. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.

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ENVS 2100 Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio introduces local urban environmental topics through which the student develops research, communication, project management and group skills. This cross-disciplinary course will inform and challenge students' perspectives of their world, while providing the opportunity to identify problems and develop solutions. Students' work will be exhibited through a project affiliated with CityStudio.Participation in field trips is required. This core course in the Environmental Studies Program is open to students in other disciplines.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the instructor or Environmental Studies coordinator.

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ENVS 2410 Environmental Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to environmental law with special reference to British Columbia. Topics include how laws are formulated and revised, review of key current international, federal and provincial environmental legislation and how it operates in reality, compliance and enforcement, due diligence, and the legal responsibilities of individuals, companies and governments in environmental protection. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the coordinator.

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ENVS 2470 Field School
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A practical field methods course, including lectures (Spring Semester) and a mandatory, off-campus, field component shortly after the final examinations period (end of semester). Team taught, the course will feature techniques used for terrain analysis, mapping, inventory of ecosystems, water quality testing, and report writing. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): Any two of the following: BIOL 1115, BIOL 1215, CHEM 1117, CHEM 1217, CHEM 1120, GEOG 1155, either GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110; or permission of the environmental studies coordinator.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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GEOG 1180 Physical Geography: Meteorology, Climatology and Biogeography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course is an introduction to the studies of the atmosphere (meteorology), climate (climatology) and vegetation distribution (biogeography). Topics covered include atmospheric processes, local and global weather, air pollution, world climates, plant-climate interactions, urban climates, past climates and future climates. This is a laboratory science course. The lab work provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a series of applied and practical problems. Students will also learn how to make weather observations.

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One of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3; LEAP 8; a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CMNS 1115, ENGL 1120, 1123, or 1128; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; and One of the following prerequisite combinations: 1) A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1218, or 1175; or 2) A minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11, Anatomy and Physiology 12, or equivalent; and a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217.

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BIOL 1118 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course pays special attention to human populations and their interactions with the environment. It is meant to be topical and at times controversial, and students are encouraged to participate in discussion, and play an active role. The course is particularly advised for those intending to pursue a non-science credential in the Environmental Studies Program.

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One of
BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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BIOL 1218 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

After developing a foundation in ecological theory, students examine issues in conservation biology. Major topics include loss of biodiversity, habitat fragmentation, conservation genetics, wildlife management, and human ecology. Local field trips are required as part of the lab portion of the course. This course is primarily for non-science majors interested in taking a biology course that emphasizes environmental issues.

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One of
CHEM 1117 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course emphasizes the practical applications of chemistry in nature, living systems, and society. The role of science in shaping our view of ourselves and our surroundings will also be examined. An opportunity to do science will be provided by means of participatory lecture demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and take-home experiments.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
CHEM 1217 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a chemistry course for arts majors that focuses on biological and organic chemistry with an emphasis on environmental issues. Topics covered include toxicology, drug chemistry, food chemistry, hydrocarbons, and plastics. This course meets the laboratory science requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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GEOG 1190 Physical Geography: Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to the dynamic forces and processes responsible for shaping the surface of the earth and the development of landforms (geomorphology). Topics covered include the internal structure of the earth; plate tectonics; volcanism; earthquakes; mountain building; the effects of water, ice and wind on the surface of the earth and the development and distribution of soils. This is a laboratory science course. Weekly labs teach skills in the use of topographic maps, air photo interpretation and terrain analysis. There will be a field trip to a local area of interest.

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GEOL 1110 Introduction to Geology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course provides an introduction to physical geology. Topics include the origin and structure of the earth, the nature of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, deformation of the earth's crust, seismic activity, geomorphic processes and the development of landforms. This is a laboratory science course with science credit. Labs will emphasise rock and mineral identification techniques.

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Notes:
* At some institutions, GEOG 1190 and GEOL1110 are considered identical courses. Students who take both GEOG 1190 and GEOL1110 may not receive transfer credit for both courses. Please consult the BCCAT transfer guide or Langara Geography Department.
 
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ABST 1206 Physical Resources and Aboriginal People
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course will critically examine and explore the relationship between Aboriginal people and physical resources. Both Aboriginal and Western perspectives will be reviewed and discussed regarding the following physical resources: land and environment, water, forestry, fisheries, minerals, agriculture, wildlife management, mining and energy. For each of the preceding, the Aboriginal perspective will be discussed and followed by a full description of the resource and the relevant government legislation and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Case studies and the laboratory will support the student. This course will be of interest to any one interested in natural resources.

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ABST 1207 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge and Contemporary Science
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This science course will integrate Aboriginal Traditional knowledge with the basic elements of the physical and biological sciences. Contemporary science will be examined and compared with Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge. The Aboriginal concepts of nature, governance, origin accounts, knowledge systems, and stewardship issues, amongst other topics, will be explored. The course will be taught from an Aboriginal perspective that is respectful of culture and Traditional Knowledge, yet attentive of the realities of contemporary science.

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ABST 2230 Aboriginal Community Development
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on Aboriginal community development and the needs of Aboriginal communities now and in the future. Strategies for success will be examined as Aboriginal communities move toward self-reliance. Case studies will be used to explore course concepts.

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ABST 2240 Urban Aboriginal Strategies
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Since 1951 there has been a rapid growth in the number of First Nations Canadians living in the city. Despite this there has been little academic attention given to the systemic study of Canadian Aboriginal peoples living in urban centres. This course introduces students to the problems and prospects faced by Canadian First Nations people in urban environments. Topics include migration, housing, employment, and a critical examination of government policy regarding acculturation and assimilation.

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ANTH 1120 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human cultures. Topics include methods, some theory and a consideration of how people obtain their living (subsistence, economy), how they live together (social structure, marriage, law etc.) and their beliefs and practices (religion, arts, rituals etc.)

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ANTH 1132 Introduction to Archaeology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the study of human prehistory; an examination of the evidence for human cultural evolution; and a consideration of the various motives, methods and techniques that have been involved in reconstructing past cultures.

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ANTH 1180 Aboriginal Cultures of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the origins and development of Interior and Coastal peoples. This survey course will consider the earliest cultural evidence, the development of regional diversity and the indigenous cultures at the time of contact.

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Students should consult with the Langara College Calendar and the Applied Planning Co-ordinator about the prerequisites for APPL 2310.
 
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3; LEAP 8; a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CMNS 1115, ENGL 1120, 1123, or 1128; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; and One of the following prerequisite combinations: 1) A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1218, or 1175; or 2) A minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11, Anatomy and Physiology 12, or equivalent; and a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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BIOL 1118 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course pays special attention to human populations and their interactions with the environment. It is meant to be topical and at times controversial, and students are encouraged to participate in discussion, and play an active role. The course is particularly advised for those intending to pursue a non-science credential in the Environmental Studies Program.

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BIOL 1185 Human Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Human ecology is the study of relationships between people and the environment. This course will review how human relationships to the natural resources present in the area have changed over the period of human occupation. It will focus on the different relationships that a hunting/gathering culture and an industrial-based society have to their environment and use of food resources. The latter part of the course will examine contemporary land use practices and issues from a human ecological perspective. Offered as part of Fraser River Studies and Mekong River Studies.

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BIOL 1218 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

After developing a foundation in ecological theory, students examine issues in conservation biology. Major topics include loss of biodiversity, habitat fragmentation, conservation genetics, wildlife management, and human ecology. Local field trips are required as part of the lab portion of the course. This course is primarily for non-science majors interested in taking a biology course that emphasizes environmental issues.

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BIOL 2286 Ecology of the Mekong River
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 3.0

An introductory, science-transfer ecology course taught mostly in Thailand. The course will emphasize terrestrial and fresh water ecosystems using examples from the Mekong River Basin.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1115 and BIOL 1215 or equivalent with a minimum "C-" grade.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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CHEM 1117 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course emphasizes the practical applications of chemistry in nature, living systems, and society. The role of science in shaping our view of ourselves and our surroundings will also be examined. An opportunity to do science will be provided by means of participatory lecture demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and take-home experiments.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1121 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course constitutes a first year course in general college chemistry. Topics include: quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure, and chemistry in society. Students may obtain credit for only one of: CHEM 1120 OR CHEM 1121. These courses have the same learning outcomes but differ in their delivery mode. CHEM 1121 and CHEM 1221 will run with 100% online lectures and 100% online synchronous labs.Note: Students intending to use this course for transfer to a university should be aware that this course is not intended to transfer to UBC Vancouver as CHEM 121.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in CHEM 1118 or a minimum "B" grade in Chemistry 12; and a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12, or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for three years.

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CHEM 1217 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a chemistry course for arts majors that focuses on biological and organic chemistry with an emphasis on environmental issues. Topics covered include toxicology, drug chemistry, food chemistry, hydrocarbons, and plastics. This course meets the laboratory science requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1221 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course constitutes the second half of a first year course in general college chemistry. Topics include: solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity. Students may obtain credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221. These courses have the same learning outcomes but differ in their delivery mode. CHEM 1121 and 1221 will run with 100% online lectures and 100% online synchronous labs.Note: Students intending to use this course for transfer to a university should be aware that this course is not intended to transfer to UBC Vancouver as CHEM 123.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in CHEM 1120 or 1121; and a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12, or MDT 75. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for three years.

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CHEM 2222 Analytical Chemistry
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 4.0

Introduction to qualitative and quantitative chemical analytical techniques and statistical analysis of data.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2250 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This second-year level Chemistry course builds on a first-year knowledge of chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and thermodynamics. This course is required for second-year biology and is useful in a variety of fields such as agriculture, medicine and earth sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 2210 and 2250.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 and one of the following: MATH 1171, 1174, 1253, or the combination of MATH 1173 and 1183. MATH 1271 or the combination of MATH 1273 and 1283 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2316 Organic Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds including hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds; and an introduction to reaction mechanisms, to stereochemistry and to the use of spectroscopy in organic chemistry.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2416 Organic Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include aromatic compounds, alcohols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbonylic acids, amines, and amino acids. Bio-organic systems may also be covered.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2316 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CMNS 1115 Interpersonal Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Interpersonal communications theory put into practice in exercises, group and individual projects that cover small group dynamics, interviews, and oral presentations. Graded S/U.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 2; LETN 02; a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; IELTS 6.5 or equivalent; or Duolingo 110.

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CMNS 1118 Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Training in writing skills, with emphasis on business writing in a career context. Writing projects include: memos, letters, reports, resumes, and employment correspondence.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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CMNS 2228 Advanced Written Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students in CMNS 2228 will learn advanced written communication skills, including both business and technical writing. Students will learn and practice advanced editing skills and writing for the Web.Prerequisite(s): One of CMNS 1118, ENGL 1123, 1127, or ENGL 1140, or permission of the English Department.

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ECON 1220 Principles of Microeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory concepts; the market system; price determination; demand and utility; competitive supply; cost analysis; market structures; equilibrium of the firm; pricing of factor inputs; land rents; wages; interest and capital.

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ECON 1221 Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory macroeconomic concepts; circular flow of income and product; national income; equilibrium level of domestic income; fiscal policy; money and banking; international trade; inflation and unemployment.

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ENGL 2237 Exploring Literature 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines one genre, theme, or national literature. Contents vary with instructor and semester. Check the Registration Guide and Course Schedule each semester for details. Term papers and extensive reading are required.Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; and one of ENGL 1129 or 1130 or equivalent.

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GEOG 1120 Regional Geography of Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Regional Geography of Canada explores the similarities and differences among the regions of our country. Students will gain an understanding of the landscape, the environment and the economy as we survey Canada from Long Beach to Labrador and from Baffin Island to Burlington. Students will examine a range of social issues that provide insight into the nature of Canada.

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GEOG 1130 Urban Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the evolution of the city from the Greco-Roman period to the present. The course topics include the internal structure of the city; industrial, commercial and residential land use; transportation and the planning of the urban environment. An application of the concepts to Vancouver and the surrounding area forms the basis of practical and interactive planning focus groups.

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GEOG 1150 Geography of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

British Columbia is a richly endowed and diverse province. In this course the province's human and physical geography is explored. Topics covered include regions, climate, natural hazards, geomorphology, biogeography, history, resource development, Aboriginal issues, cultural diversity, and urbanization. Students will actively engage in discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and solutions. This course is of interest to students who would like to have a better understanding of British Columbia and its role within Canada and the world.

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GEOG 2155 Sustainable Resource and Environmental Management
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students examine the sustainable use and management of environmental resources. Subjects that may be explored include indigenous rights and access to resources, environmental impact assessment, resource conflicts, local and indigenous knowledge, methods of environmental management, gender and resources, and the roles and responsibilities of governmental and non-governmental decision-makers. Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2250, 2270, ENVS 2100, or 2390; or permission of the department.

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GEOG 2210 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A laboratory science course that introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students explore the theoretical underpinnings of geographical information science and apply this knowledge to the creation of a map portfolio through labs and a major project. Topics covered include spatial measurement, geodesy, map projections, cartography, and remote sensing. In the lab component, students will utilize GIS software, through various applications and commands, to analyze applied problems in geographically related phenomena.This course is recommended to students interested in using spatial data collection and analysis to solve applied problems within their discipline.

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GEOG 2230 Contemporary Canadian Urban Life
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Explores the unique character of Canadian cities. Topics include transportation, housing, population growth, and suburban development.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2210, 2240, or 2270; or another social science course with permission of the instructor or department.

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GEOG 2250 Economic Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of economic geography and examines the changing geography or 'global shift' of economic activity within the contemporary world economy. The course examines the economic, political, and social relations that are part of modern market economies, as well as the role played by key economic actors such as business, government, labour, and consumers. The significance of changing technology over time and space, and issues related to development and globalization are also discussed. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2210, or 2270; or another social science course with permission of the instructor.

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GEOG 2290 Advanced Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Advanced studies of the processes that affect development of natural landforms and landscapes. GEOG 2290 is a laboratory science course with both lecture and laboratory sections. Topics covered include fluvial, coastal, desert glacial and periglacial processes, natural weathering phenomena and soil profile development. Topics of local interest include mass movement, earthquake activity, volcanism and natural hazards associated with the Greater Vancouver - Fraser River Valley region. Weekly labs will introduce methods of analysis with case studies as means to teach applications in environmental assessment and interpretation. Field trips will focus on local landscape development.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110 or with the permission of the instructor.

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GEOL 2207 Natural Hazards
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to catastrophic natural events including earthquakes, volcanoes, mass movement, severe weather, fire, and river and coastal flooding. Also presented are climate change, sea-level fluctuation and ground water pollution, which represent other seemingly less dramatic, but no less important, hazardous conditions. Emphasis is placed on how these events impact on the earth's natural environment and how they influence and are influenced by human activity including efforts at predictions, preventions, and mitigation of large and small scale events.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110.

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HIST 2215 History of Urban Growth in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines how and why Canadian cities and towns took the shape they did. Central to this understanding is an investigation of early urban forms in Canada and their antecedent and contemporary forms in Europe and the U.S. The course will explore the diverse social, political, economic, intellectual, religious, technological, topographical, and aesthetic elements which combined to shape Canadian cities and towns and influenced the path of urban growth.

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HIST 2217 Modern British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A topical survey of British Columbia history since Confederation in 1871 with special attention to the structure of B.C.'s economy, the ethnic make-up of the province, First Nations' issues, industrial relations, urbanization, environmental questions and provincial politics. In addition, this course provides an introduction to historical research methods.

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HIST 2260 Environmental History
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the main currents of research and writing in the field of environmental history. Students will examine the intellectual and cultural history of ideas of nature, wilderness, environment and the human relation to it, as well as the principal ways - political, economic, social and cultural - in which humans have related to the environment.

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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1104 Critical Thinking
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Thinking critically means knowing how to support your beliefs and actions with good reasons and how to evaluate reasons given by others. In this course, you will learn to distinguish good from bad arguments as they occur in everyday discussions, including in the news media, political campaigns, advertising, and other contexts. The goal is to help you to cultivate a solid habit of going through life as a critical thinker, which should lead to better reasoned decision-making, rather than decisions based on unexamined opinions, impulse, prejudice, or social pressure. Students will be taught, through extensive examples, how to understand, criticize, and construct arguments, and how to recognize common errors in reasoning.ESL students who have difficulty reading or writing English may find this course challenging. They are encouraged to discuss their participation in this course with the instructor.

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PHIL 1120 Environmental Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce students to the moral issues associated with human interaction with our environment and provide them with the methodology for critically assessing these issues. Topics include: Are animals, plants, and trees entitled to moral consideration? If so, how much and why? How do we fairly distribute the burdens of environmental stewardship between nations and between generations? Do we owe any moral obligations to future generations? Are groups, like species and ecosystems, deserving of moral consideration? Must we promote sustainability? When, if ever, may we engage in acts of violence in order to protect animals and/or the ecosystem?

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PHIL 2202 Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A consideration of such questions as: When can we hold an individual morally responsible for his actions? What is freedom? What are my obligations to my community? From the courses of action open to me, what ought I to do? What is the nature of the good? The course will consider the views of philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Mill and Sartre.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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PHIL 2210 Contemporary Moral Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of important moral controversies in such fields as social justice, international relations, multiculturalism, environmental ethics, corporate responsibility and personal relationships. The focus is on learning to reach balanced moral decisions, supported by sound philosophical reasoning.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year philosophy course, or consent of the instructor.

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POLI 2240 International Political Economy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the elements of international political economics including trade, monetary issues, trans-national corporations, poverty, dependency, development, and the environment. Any previous Political Science or Economics course is helpful.

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POLI 2245 Canadian International Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This general introduction to a variety of topics in Canadian international relations (defence concerns, foreign policy, and international economics) will use competing analyses to explain Canadian actions. Examples will include NATO, NORAD, US-Canada relations, peacekeeping, policy initiatives, the UN, WTO, NAFTA, and the role of Canadian civil society. Historical context and current concerns will be emphasized.Prerequisite(s): POLI 1119 or POLI 1140 or POLI 1145.

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SOCI 1126 Introduction to Environmental Sociology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to central sociological concepts and theories through the use of environmental examples. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the environment as a social issue, how environmental issues come to be constructed, the social structural and cultural origins of environmental problems, and how these problems can be understood in terms of the sociological perspective.

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SOCI 2240 Contemporary Social Movements
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological examination of some of the major social movements, and their contesting ideologies, through which the contemporary social world is constructed. Theoretical tools will be developed to analyze movements organized around the ideas and practices of varieties of: neo-conservatism, feminism, ethno-nationalism, environmentalism, socialism, and religious fundamentalism. A cross-cultural perspective will be emphasized.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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STAT 1124 Statistical Methods I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

An introductory course in statistics developed through the concept of randomness for students in social sciences, nursing, social work, physiotherapy, business, etc. Topics will include sampling, experimental design, levels of measurement, descriptive statistics, regression, sampling distributions, normal distribution and inferential procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing. This course may be followed by STAT 1224. Students will receive college credit for only one of STAT 1123, 1124, or 1181.Students will receive college credit for only one of PSYC 2321 or STAT 1124.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum "C" grade in Foundations of Mathematics 11, Precalculus 11, Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Precalculus 12; an "S" grade in MATH 1150; or MDT 053. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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first-year university-transferable MATH course (maximum of 2 courses)
3
first-year university-transferable PHYS course (maximum of 2 courses)
3

Program Option Notes:

  1. When choosing courses, students should consult the Arts and Science Diploma general requirements to ensure they choose a selection of courses that meet these requirements.
  2. Two electives may be chosen from other Langara College course offerings with approval of the Program Co-ordinator.
  3. Students who have taken STAT 1123, STAT 1127, STAT 1128, POLI 2219 or PHIL 1105 prior to the Fall Semester 2007 may use these courses as electives.
  4. Selection of courses is critical to those students planning to proceed beyond the two-year program. Consultation with the Environmental Studies Co-ordinator is highly advised. (For example: CHEM 1117 and CHEM 1217, BIOL 1118 and BIOL 1218 transfer as science credit for non-science majors. Those considering a science degree should register in CHEM 1120 and 1220, BIOL 1115 and 1215).

The Citation in Environmental Studies is designed for students who have completed a number of courses relating to environmental issues while pursuing a diploma, associate degree, or bachelor's degree in another subject area.

CURRICULUM

Students must complete at least five of the following courses, with a maximum of two courses in any one subject area.

Courses Credits
Five of
ABST 1206 Physical Resources and Aboriginal People
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course will critically examine and explore the relationship between Aboriginal people and physical resources. Both Aboriginal and Western perspectives will be reviewed and discussed regarding the following physical resources: land and environment, water, forestry, fisheries, minerals, agriculture, wildlife management, mining and energy. For each of the preceding, the Aboriginal perspective will be discussed and followed by a full description of the resource and the relevant government legislation and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Case studies and the laboratory will support the student. This course will be of interest to any one interested in natural resources.

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ABST 1207 Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge and Contemporary Science
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This science course will integrate Aboriginal Traditional knowledge with the basic elements of the physical and biological sciences. Contemporary science will be examined and compared with Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge. The Aboriginal concepts of nature, governance, origin accounts, knowledge systems, and stewardship issues, amongst other topics, will be explored. The course will be taught from an Aboriginal perspective that is respectful of culture and Traditional Knowledge, yet attentive of the realities of contemporary science.

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ABST 2230 Aboriginal Community Development
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on Aboriginal community development and the needs of Aboriginal communities now and in the future. Strategies for success will be examined as Aboriginal communities move toward self-reliance. Case studies will be used to explore course concepts.

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BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3; LEAP 8; a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CMNS 1115, ENGL 1120, 1123, or 1128; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; and One of the following prerequisite combinations: 1) A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1218, or 1175; or 2) A minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11, Anatomy and Physiology 12, or equivalent; and a minimum "C+" grade in one of the following: Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217.

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BIOL 1118 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course pays special attention to human populations and their interactions with the environment. It is meant to be topical and at times controversial, and students are encouraged to participate in discussion, and play an active role. The course is particularly advised for those intending to pursue a non-science credential in the Environmental Studies Program.

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BIOL 1185 Human Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Human ecology is the study of relationships between people and the environment. This course will review how human relationships to the natural resources present in the area have changed over the period of human occupation. It will focus on the different relationships that a hunting/gathering culture and an industrial-based society have to their environment and use of food resources. The latter part of the course will examine contemporary land use practices and issues from a human ecological perspective. Offered as part of Fraser River Studies and Mekong River Studies.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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BIOL 1218 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

After developing a foundation in ecological theory, students examine issues in conservation biology. Major topics include loss of biodiversity, habitat fragmentation, conservation genetics, wildlife management, and human ecology. Local field trips are required as part of the lab portion of the course. This course is primarily for non-science majors interested in taking a biology course that emphasizes environmental issues.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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CHEM 1117 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course emphasizes the practical applications of chemistry in nature, living systems, and society. The role of science in shaping our view of ourselves and our surroundings will also be examined. An opportunity to do science will be provided by means of participatory lecture demonstrations, laboratory experiments, and take-home experiments.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1121 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course constitutes a first year course in general college chemistry. Topics include: quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure, and chemistry in society. Students may obtain credit for only one of: CHEM 1120 OR CHEM 1121. These courses have the same learning outcomes but differ in their delivery mode. CHEM 1121 and CHEM 1221 will run with 100% online lectures and 100% online synchronous labs.Note: Students intending to use this course for transfer to a university should be aware that this course is not intended to transfer to UBC Vancouver as CHEM 121.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in CHEM 1118 or a minimum "B" grade in Chemistry 12; and a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12, or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for three years.

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CHEM 1217 Environmental Chemistry for Arts Majors II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a chemistry course for arts majors that focuses on biological and organic chemistry with an emphasis on environmental issues. Topics covered include toxicology, drug chemistry, food chemistry, hydrocarbons, and plastics. This course meets the laboratory science requirement for the Associate of Arts Degree.Note: Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1221 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course constitutes the second half of a first year course in general college chemistry. Topics include: solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity. Students may obtain credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221. These courses have the same learning outcomes but differ in their delivery mode. CHEM 1121 and 1221 will run with 100% online lectures and 100% online synchronous labs.Note: Students intending to use this course for transfer to a university should be aware that this course is not intended to transfer to UBC Vancouver as CHEM 123.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in CHEM 1120 or 1121; and a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12, or MDT 75. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for three years.

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CHEM 2222 Analytical Chemistry
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 4.0

Introduction to qualitative and quantitative chemical analytical techniques and statistical analysis of data.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2250 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This second-year level Chemistry course builds on a first-year knowledge of chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and thermodynamics. This course is required for second-year biology and is useful in a variety of fields such as agriculture, medicine and earth sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 2210 and 2250.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 and one of the following: MATH 1171, 1174, 1253, or the combination of MATH 1173 and 1183. MATH 1271 or the combination of MATH 1273 and 1283 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2316 Organic Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds including hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds; and an introduction to reaction mechanisms, to stereochemistry and to the use of spectroscopy in organic chemistry.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2416 Organic Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include aromatic compounds, alcohols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbonylic acids, amines, and amino acids. Bio-organic systems may also be covered.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2316 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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ECON 1110 Urban and Rural Economic Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course uses economic principles to describe and analyze economic issues confronting urban and rural areas, such as poverty, housing, transportation, municipal government, urban sprawl, and quality of life.

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ECON 2260 Environmental Economics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will examine the links between the economy and the environment. They will use economic principles to explain why environmental problems occur in a market economy and study how economic policy instruments can be used to deal with these problems.Prerequisite(s): ECON 1220 and 1221.

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ENGL 2237 Exploring Literature 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines one genre, theme, or national literature. Contents vary with instructor and semester. Check the Registration Guide and Course Schedule each semester for details. Term papers and extensive reading are required.Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; and one of ENGL 1129 or 1130 or equivalent.

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ENVS 2100 Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio introduces local urban environmental topics through which the student develops research, communication, project management and group skills. This cross-disciplinary course will inform and challenge students' perspectives of their world, while providing the opportunity to identify problems and develop solutions. Students' work will be exhibited through a project affiliated with CityStudio.Participation in field trips is required. This core course in the Environmental Studies Program is open to students in other disciplines.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the instructor or Environmental Studies coordinator.

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ENVS 2410 Environmental Law
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to environmental law with special reference to British Columbia. Topics include how laws are formulated and revised, review of key current international, federal and provincial environmental legislation and how it operates in reality, compliance and enforcement, due diligence, and the legal responsibilities of individuals, companies and governments in environmental protection. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the coordinator.

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ENVS 2470 Field School
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A practical field methods course, including lectures (Spring Semester) and a mandatory, off-campus, field component shortly after the final examinations period (end of semester). Team taught, the course will feature techniques used for terrain analysis, mapping, inventory of ecosystems, water quality testing, and report writing. Required for the Arts and Science (Environmental Studies) diploma.Prerequisite(s): Any two of the following: BIOL 1115, BIOL 1215, CHEM 1117, CHEM 1217, CHEM 1120, GEOG 1155, either GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110; or permission of the environmental studies coordinator.

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GEOG 1120 Regional Geography of Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Regional Geography of Canada explores the similarities and differences among the regions of our country. Students will gain an understanding of the landscape, the environment and the economy as we survey Canada from Long Beach to Labrador and from Baffin Island to Burlington. Students will examine a range of social issues that provide insight into the nature of Canada.

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GEOG 1130 Urban Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the evolution of the city from the Greco-Roman period to the present. The course topics include the internal structure of the city; industrial, commercial and residential land use; transportation and the planning of the urban environment. An application of the concepts to Vancouver and the surrounding area forms the basis of practical and interactive planning focus groups.

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GEOG 1150 Geography of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

British Columbia is a richly endowed and diverse province. In this course the province's human and physical geography is explored. Topics covered include regions, climate, natural hazards, geomorphology, biogeography, history, resource development, Aboriginal issues, cultural diversity, and urbanization. Students will actively engage in discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and solutions. This course is of interest to students who would like to have a better understanding of British Columbia and its role within Canada and the world.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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GEOG 1180 Physical Geography: Meteorology, Climatology and Biogeography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course is an introduction to the studies of the atmosphere (meteorology), climate (climatology) and vegetation distribution (biogeography). Topics covered include atmospheric processes, local and global weather, air pollution, world climates, plant-climate interactions, urban climates, past climates and future climates. This is a laboratory science course. The lab work provides students with an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to a series of applied and practical problems. Students will also learn how to make weather observations.

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GEOG 1190 Physical Geography: Geomorphology 2
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to the dynamic forces and processes responsible for shaping the surface of the earth and the development of landforms (geomorphology). Topics covered include the internal structure of the earth; plate tectonics; volcanism; earthquakes; mountain building; the effects of water, ice and wind on the surface of the earth and the development and distribution of soils. This is a laboratory science course. Weekly labs teach skills in the use of topographic maps, air photo interpretation and terrain analysis. There will be a field trip to a local area of interest.

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GEOG 2155 Sustainable Resource and Environmental Management
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Students examine the sustainable use and management of environmental resources. Subjects that may be explored include indigenous rights and access to resources, environmental impact assessment, resource conflicts, local and indigenous knowledge, methods of environmental management, gender and resources, and the roles and responsibilities of governmental and non-governmental decision-makers. Prerequisite(s): One of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2250, 2270, ENVS 2100, or 2390; or permission of the department.

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GEOG 2230 Contemporary Canadian Urban Life
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Explores the unique character of Canadian cities. Topics include transportation, housing, population growth, and suburban development.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2210, 2240, or 2270; or another social science course with permission of the instructor or department.

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GEOG 2290 Advanced Geomorphology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Advanced studies of the processes that affect development of natural landforms and landscapes. GEOG 2290 is a laboratory science course with both lecture and laboratory sections. Topics covered include fluvial, coastal, desert glacial and periglacial processes, natural weathering phenomena and soil profile development. Topics of local interest include mass movement, earthquake activity, volcanism and natural hazards associated with the Greater Vancouver - Fraser River Valley region. Weekly labs will introduce methods of analysis with case studies as means to teach applications in environmental assessment and interpretation. Field trips will focus on local landscape development.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110 or with the permission of the instructor.

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GEOL 1110 Introduction to Geology 3
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course provides an introduction to physical geology. Topics include the origin and structure of the earth, the nature of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, deformation of the earth's crust, seismic activity, geomorphic processes and the development of landforms. This is a laboratory science course with science credit. Labs will emphasise rock and mineral identification techniques.

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GEOL 2207 Natural Hazards
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introduction to catastrophic natural events including earthquakes, volcanoes, mass movement, severe weather, fire, and river and coastal flooding. Also presented are climate change, sea-level fluctuation and ground water pollution, which represent other seemingly less dramatic, but no less important, hazardous conditions. Emphasis is placed on how these events impact on the earth's natural environment and how they influence and are influenced by human activity including efforts at predictions, preventions, and mitigation of large and small scale events.Prerequisite(s): GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110.

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HIST 2215 History of Urban Growth in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines how and why Canadian cities and towns took the shape they did. Central to this understanding is an investigation of early urban forms in Canada and their antecedent and contemporary forms in Europe and the U.S. The course will explore the diverse social, political, economic, intellectual, religious, technological, topographical, and aesthetic elements which combined to shape Canadian cities and towns and influenced the path of urban growth.

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HIST 2217 Modern British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A topical survey of British Columbia history since Confederation in 1871 with special attention to the structure of B.C.'s economy, the ethnic make-up of the province, First Nations' issues, industrial relations, urbanization, environmental questions and provincial politics. In addition, this course provides an introduction to historical research methods.

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HIST 2260 Environmental History
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the main currents of research and writing in the field of environmental history. Students will examine the intellectual and cultural history of ideas of nature, wilderness, environment and the human relation to it, as well as the principal ways - political, economic, social and cultural - in which humans have related to the environment.

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PHIL 1120 Environmental Ethics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce students to the moral issues associated with human interaction with our environment and provide them with the methodology for critically assessing these issues. Topics include: Are animals, plants, and trees entitled to moral consideration? If so, how much and why? How do we fairly distribute the burdens of environmental stewardship between nations and between generations? Do we owe any moral obligations to future generations? Are groups, like species and ecosystems, deserving of moral consideration? Must we promote sustainability? When, if ever, may we engage in acts of violence in order to protect animals and/or the ecosystem?

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PHIL 2210 Contemporary Moral Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of important moral controversies in such fields as social justice, international relations, multiculturalism, environmental ethics, corporate responsibility and personal relationships. The focus is on learning to reach balanced moral decisions, supported by sound philosophical reasoning.Prerequisite(s): Any first-year philosophy course, or consent of the instructor.

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POLI 2240 International Political Economy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the elements of international political economics including trade, monetary issues, trans-national corporations, poverty, dependency, development, and the environment. Any previous Political Science or Economics course is helpful.

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SOCI 1126 Introduction to Environmental Sociology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to central sociological concepts and theories through the use of environmental examples. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the environment as a social issue, how environmental issues come to be constructed, the social structural and cultural origins of environmental problems, and how these problems can be understood in terms of the sociological perspective.

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SOCI 2240 Contemporary Social Movements
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A sociological examination of some of the major social movements, and their contesting ideologies, through which the contemporary social world is constructed. Theoretical tools will be developed to analyze movements organized around the ideas and practices of varieties of: neo-conservatism, feminism, ethno-nationalism, environmentalism, socialism, and religious fundamentalism. A cross-cultural perspective will be emphasized.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of SOCI 1120, 1121, 1127, or ANTH 1120.

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Notes:
3 Students may count only one of GEOG 1190 or GEOL 1110 towards the citation.
 

Program Option Notes:

Students may choose one course from other Langara College course offerings with approval of the program co-ordinator.