Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The Design Formation Program at Langara College merges the design disciplines of spatial formation and communication design. This challenging area of design bridges architecture, industrial design, interior design, and graphic design. Students become familiar with a wide-ranging skill set that can be applied to everything from retail display to exhibit design to environmental graphic design, or as a basis for further study in design. The full time program involves 16 hours of studio work each week, as well as course work in English and elective selections. Students should expect to commit at least 16 hours of research, project development and completion, reading, and client presentations. The design studios are offered during the Fall and Spring semesters, electives and English courses may be available during the Summer semester. Part time study may be possible with Departmental permission.

Outcomes and Objectives

The objective of the Design Formation program is to give students a foundation in three areas of design: design knowledge, design skills, and design practice. Knowledge gives context for the designer’s practice. This includes history, contemporary trends, research, materials, and technology. In addition, students obtain a basic tool set through learning design skills in areas such as sketching, drafting, model making, computer software, and fabrication. Finally, students will become familiar with ideas of design practice that are essential to becoming a passionate and effective designer. Practice includes ideation, concept development, design development, and execution.
Career Opportunities
Students gain foundation skills in design which will lead to opportunities in these areas:

  • Design for Presentation Centres
  • Exhibit Design
  • Environmental Graphic Design
  • Museum Design
  • Product Presentation
  • Props: Design & Build
  • Retail Visual Presentation
  • Retail Merchandising
  • Retail Store Planning
  • Set Design for Film & Theatre
  • Special Events Design
  • Tradeshow Design
Notes:
  1. Except DSGN 1100, DSGN 1200, and DSGN 2100, all studio courses are restricted to students in the Design Formation program, or by permission of the Department.
  2. A minimum grade of "C" in each studio is required to progress through and graduate from the program.
  3. Design Formation students must be enrolled in all four Design Formation courses in each term.
  4. Study beyond that included in the program curriculum is required to enter the specific industry areas of graphic and interior design.

CURRICULUM

To obtain a Diploma in Design Formation, students will be required to attain 66 credits.

Once you are admitted into the Design Formation Program, you will be required to take a Langara English placement test (or equivalent) and be placed into an appropriate English course based on your score. Six credits of English are required to complete the Design Formation Diploma.

Total Credits: 66

TERM ONE

Courses Credits
All of
DSGN 1151 Communication Design I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a basic graphic design course that addresses good design applied in everyday print situations. The intent is to create an awareness of graphic design principles and processes to accomplish tasks such as the design of logos, business cards, self promotional materials, stationery packages, resume design, and simple ads. Basic knowledge of type classifications, letter and word spacing, strategies of layout, and creative thinking will all assist the novice designer to make good choices based on knowledge of sound design principles. Whether the student is entering a general arts area or a path focused on design, the skills gathered in this course, along with the accomplishments of projects assigned, will give the student a strong design foundation for a variety of computer software applications. With the importance of the computer in day-to-day information, skills to create visual communication (graphic design) are a necessity. This course encourages creative thought, visual communication vocabulary, layout skills, typography knowledge, and visual solutions as opposed to teaching software applications directly. All projects in this class can be hand-done or done using basic computer skills.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1151 and DSGN 1151.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Design Formation Program or the Professional Photography Program.

More Information »

DSGN 1152 3D Design: Retail Visual Presentation I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will give the student an awareness of what Retail Visual Presentation is and the range of applications found in the retail business environment. Students will acquire basic Retail Visual Presentation techniques, concentrating on the universal principles of design as they apply to 3D design and composition. The semester will include explorations in the area of theme development, display theory, methods and materials, industry standards, and basic presentation techniques that are utilized for a variety of commodity groups.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1152 and DSGN 1152.

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the Design Formation Program or department permission.

More Information »

DSGN 1154 Form, Materials and Process
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce the student to new materials, the safe operation of tools, and techniques utilized in the visual presentation field. This is a project-based course that will enable students to explore and develop the skills and technical knowledge required to complete design assignments discussed in 3D Design: Retail Visual Presentation I.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1154 and DSGN 1154.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation Program.

More Information »

DSGN 1255 Computers & Design: Adobe Creative Suite
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator (CS4), scanning, and printing using the Mac environment. This introductory course introduces students to the tools and capabilities of the CS4 Adobe package.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1255 and DSGN 1255.

More Information »

One of
CMNS/ENGL (See note 1)
3
One of
Elective from Electives List (see below)
3

TERM TWO

Courses Credits
All of
DSGN 1153 Introduction to Interior Spaces
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students are introduced to 3D spatial thinking as applied to the understanding and design of interior spaces. This hands-on course takes students step by step through different design methodologies to identify, describe and investigate solutions to specific interior design problems. Factors affecting interior spaces will be discussed in depth including materials, light, colour, and furniture, in relation to the human body. In addition, students will learn sketching, drafting, and other documentation to communicate their design ideas.

Students will only receive credit for one of DDSN 1153 and DSGN 1153.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation Program.

More Information »

DSGN 1250 Communication Design II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Building on skills begun in Communication Design I, students further develop the vocabulary and technical skills essential in graphic communications, and they explore in greater depth the conceptual and design process, and the development of personal style. Students will also explore working in a single and multipage document, brand and packaging design, printing processes basics, and developing an ability to apply 2D graphics in a 3D surface.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1211/1212, DDSN 1250 and DSGN 1250.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1151 with a minimum "C" grade, and DSGN 1255.

More Information »

DSGN 1252 3D Design: Retail Visual Presentation II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Building on skills from 3D Design: Retail Visual Presentation I, students will acquire further knowledge of more complex skills and techniques. The course will also cover the following: merchandising principles, fashion styling; hard goods and soft goods handling; lifestyle presentations and staging; and proposal presentations including budgets, scheduling, costing, and estimating for retail and special event presentations. Students will explore the current industry of special events and related industries.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2221/2222, DDSN 1252 and DSGN 1252.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1152.

More Information »

DSGN 2253 Computers and Design
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This hands-on course introduces students to computer aided drafting and best practice techniques of 2D and 3D drafting, using current software. Through design exercises and projects, this course focuses on integrating these skills as part of the design process. Students will also gain the ability to formally and professionally communicate their design through paper documentation and digital presentation.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2231/2232, DDSN 2253 and DSGN 2253.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation Program.

More Information »

One of
Elective from Electives List (see below)
 

TERM THREE

Courses Credits
All of
DSGN 1253 Interior Spaces: Representation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students continue to develop skills inherent to interior spaces design solutions. Creating client design briefs, investigating design criteria, generating and evaluating concepts. This project based course will address current issues and factors affecting interior spaces including, building systems, construction, sustainability, space planning and human interface. 2D-3D hand and computer drafting, material, furniture fixture, equipment, presentation boards and digital model and physical scale model presentation will be used to express the design outcomes.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1231/1232, DDSN 1253 and DSGN 1253.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation Program.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1153.

More Information »

DSGN 2151 Communication Design: Typography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is an in-depth study of typography skills for designers. Beginning with an historical timeline, students will see the cultural and technological changes in the design of letterforms. Letterform anatomy, syntax, legibility, grids, messages, integration of type, and images will be explored through case studies and student projects.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1251, 2151, and DSGN 2151.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1151 or by permission of instructor.

More Information »

DSGN 2152 3D Design: Exhibits and Events I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is designed to expose students to the broader scope of 3D Visual Presentation applications, which will include the fundamentals of exhibit and museum design. The focus of this term will emphasize variety of scale and application. Students will be challenged to further develop their existing skills, with the goal of reaching a new level of professionalism. The development of portfolio worthy compositions will also be a focus of this term.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2152 and DSGN 2152.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1154, 1255, and 2253; and minimum "C" grade in the following: DSGN 1151, 1152, 1153, 1250, and 1252.

Corequisite(s): DSGN 1253.

More Information »

DSGN 2154 Career Research
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will expose students to potential career possibilities, employment aptitude, and preparedness techniques. Through a series of guest speakers from the Applied Design Community, workshops facilitated by the instructor, and research assignments, students will explore personal career opportunities.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2154 and DGSN 2154.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1151, 1152, 1153, 1250 and 1252 with a minimum "C" grade and DSGN 1154, 1255, and 2253.

More Information »

One of
CMNS/ENGL (See note 1)
3
One of
Elective from Electives List (see below)
3

TERM FOUR

Courses Credits
All of
DSGN 2251 Communication Design: Major Projects
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this final term course, students in communication design focus on major projects development. Critical assessment, analysis, and fine tuning of design projects will assist the student in preparing for industry and assist in creation of their personal sales book.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2211/2212, DDSN 2251 and DSGN 2251.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1255; and minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1151, 1250, and 2151.

More Information »

DSGN 2252 3D Design: Exhibits and Events II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is designed to enhance the professional caliber of the skills and techniques explored in the three previous terms of the program. Exhibit and event design involves the conception, development, and execution of the design of spatial environments as a vehicle for communication. The course investigates how space and the objects within it interact with the physical body and human perception to create messages. The course takes a comprehensive look at all facets of the design process including observation and analysis, research, planning, design conceptualization, detail development, and documentation in two and three dimensions. Working in groups and individually, students will learn to demonstrate and articulate, through a variety of media, their findings, approaches, and design solutions.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2221/2222, DDSN 2252 and DSGN 2252.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1154, 1255, 2154 and 2253; and minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1151, 1152, 1153, 1250, 1252, 1253, 2151, and 2152.

Corequisite(s): DSGN 2251, 2254, and 2255.

More Information »

DSGN 2254 Field Study
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Building on the skills and knowledge in the Career Research course, students will explore the process of designing their portfolio. With consideration of the type of industry, professional identity, personal objectives, and skills needed, students will secure a practicum design position. A variety of options to explore include a design studio, or an in-house design position in a large company or organization; a place in a degree program; or the establishment of a freelance business. This course provides students the opportunity to use their skills and experience and contribute, where possible, on design projects with industry supervision. Students gain valuable insight in design environments and project deadlines. These insights pave the way for career directions.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 2254, DDSN 2427, and DSGN 2254.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1154, 1255, 2154, and 2253; and minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1151, 1152, 1153, 1250, 1252, 1253, 2151, and 2152; and two of: CMNS 1115, 1118, ENGL 1127 or ENGL 1129. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in all DSGN courses.

Corequisite(s): DSGN 2251, 2252, and 2255.

More Information »

DSGN 2255 Interior Spaces for Commercial Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students will utilize computer aided 2D and 3D drafting and presentation best practices working through the Design Process to create concept presentations for Retail Store Planning as well as Trade Show booth design.

Students will only receive credit for one of DSGN 2153 and DSGN 2255.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation Program.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1153 and 1253; and DSGN 2253.

More Information »

One of
Elective from Electives List (see below)
3

ELECTIVES LIST

Courses Credits
Four of
AHIS 1112 Visual Culture I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Visual culture is examined from a global and thematic perspective in order for students to gain a better understanding of how art communicates ideas, values, and beliefs. Students will develop visual and conceptual skills essential for analyzing and critically interpreting a wide range of visual imagery.

More Information »

AHIS 1113 Nineteenth Century Art History
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a chronological survey of the visual art and architecture of Europe and North America in the nineteenth century. The course familiarizes students with academic, salon, and avant-garde art with an emphasis on the dominance of French art. Issues of gender, class and race are addressed in relation to the historical context and development of stylistic categories such as Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Art Nouveau.

More Information »

AHIS 1114 Western Art: Prehistory to the Renaissance
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a chronological survey of western painting, sculpture and architecture from Prehistory to the Renaissance. Art works will be studied in the context of the political, economic and social developments of each period.

More Information »

AHIS 1212 Visual Culture II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines themes encountered in visual culture with an emphasis on issues of power, politics, race, social class, and the body. The relationship between visual imagery and the social context in which it is created will be examined in order to foster critical interpretation.

More Information »

AHIS 1214 Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course familiarizes students with the chronological approach to the history of art from the Renaissance through Baroque, Rococo and 19th century to the modern and postmodern periods. Art works will be examined in relation to relevant political, economic and social factors of each historical period.

More Information »

AHIS 1301 Modern Art I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a chronological survey of modern art and modernism and its development in the first half of the twentieth century. The major art movements, artworks and theories will be considered within their historical context.

More Information »

AHIS 1302 Modern Art II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a chronological survey of modernism in its later stages and international contemporary art to the present. The important issues, theories, and variety of forms visual art has taken in recent decades will be considered.

More Information »

BUSM 1115 Entrepreneurship
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A practical course which introduces the relevant aspects of setting up a small business. These include basic accounting concepts, forms of legal ownership, basic market research, determination of marketing and personnel policies, budgeting, financing, purchasing, promotion, and pricing. Also explored are the personal characteristics of the successful entrepreneur.

Prerequisite(s): English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in BC English 12 or equivalent; a minimum 67% in BC English Literature 12; a minimum 67% in BC English First Peoples 12; a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.



More Information »

DSGN 1100 Design Explorations: From Typography to Tattoos
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course explores the relevance and impact of design in our everyday lives and details design trends and transitions in an historical context. It examines the form and function of everyday items such as tattoos, music posters, magazine covers, cell phones, as well as automobiles and houses, and it explores how environment, culture, and technology have shaped - and continue to shape - the design of such commonly used items. The course also looks at how design is related to "branding" and its influence on consumer preferences. This course is open to all Langara students wishing to explore trends in design, as well as those intending to pursue studies in the visual arts areas, or considering careers in design. This course is not intended to teach students design skills.

Students will receive credit for only one of DDSN 1100 and DSGN 1100.

More Information »

DSGN 1200 Design Explorations II: The Designers - Form & Function
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students take an in-depth look at the leading visionaries who have altered the way we see and use products, create cult status, and shape spaces in our environments. We will analyze a variety of designers of architecture, graphic design, and industrial design to see how changes in our society, changes in our environment, and changes in technology have created the "need" for objects to be designed. This course will illustrate how these objects and spaces have a strong impact on society, how and where we live, what we buy, and what we view.

Prerequisite(s): DSGN 1100 is recommended.

More Information »

DSGN 2100 Furniture Design
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Well-designed furniture requires a thoughtful, thorough design approach grounded in function, along with understanding the human form and aesthetics. Through lectures, exercises, and hands on projects students develop skills for furniture creation. Project outcomes synthesize concept, materials, fabrication, and form. Students utilize the furniture design process and hands on practice with tools and equipment to realize their own furniture concept.

Prerequisite(s): None, but some experience fabricating (high school shop) or some experience drawing (CAD or hand) is useful.

More Information »

FINA 1120 Introduction to Drawing I
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students are introduced to basic observation and drawing techniques with an emphasis on perceptual skills. Students develop confidence with a variety of drawing materials through the exploration of still life, figure drawing with models, and perception of the world around them. Studio sessions include group critiques of student assignments and studio time to apply techniques learned.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET with a minimum Level 3; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension; a minimum 70% in one of BC English 12, BC English Literature 12, or BC English First Peoples 12; a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit, with a minimum "C-" grade; or a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120, or an "S" grade in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

FINA 1220 Introduction to Drawing II
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students continue to develop perceptual drawing skills and processes, with an emphasis on the uses of tonal values. The range of drawing materials are expanded, using more complex situations involving still life, models, and the urban/natural environment. Studio work and assignments are complemented with critiques and lectures.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in FINA 1120.

More Information »

MARK 1115 Introduction to Marketing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Marketing is an exciting and dynamic business discipline, which offers excellent career prospects. The course covers the roles and functions of marketing in the modern business enterprise with particular emphasis on the elements in marketing such as product planning and development, pricing, promotion and distribution. The course delivery is a series of lectures including a lot of interaction through discussion, teamwork, videos, practical exercises and case studies so you can relate the material discussed to real life business challenges.

More Information »

MARK 3100 Special Events Planning and Marketing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce students to the exciting industry of Event Marketing and Sponsorship including social functions, domestic and international trade shows, conferences, and major conventions. The course will examine the strategic reasons why organizations participate in event marketing and sponsorship activity in both the domestic and international marketing environment. In addition, students will be exposed to the tactics used in the pitching, designing, planning, marketing, managing, budgeting, execution and evaluation of events. Students will gain experience practicing the skills that are required in event management and execution including business development, proposal writing, event design, budgeting, venue selection, catering, determining audio visual requirements, security, risk management, and more. The course is taught using a series of seminar type lectures, group work and individual assignments and a major project.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 54 credits including MARK 1115 with a minimum "C" grade and 6 credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade. For students in the fourth term of the Design Formation Program, completion of MARK 1115, DDSN 2152, and 6 credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade will be deemed to be equivalent to the above.

More Information »

MARK 3400 Retail Marketing
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course covers the principles and practice of strategic retail marketing and orients students to the dynamic and competitive nature of the industry. Topics include contemporary issues in retail including in-store and non-store retailing, e-tailing, managing the retail operations, supplier relationships, pricing, merchandising, retail advertising, sales promotion, sales techniques, inventory management and control, and store design and location.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum 54 credits including MARK 1115 with a minimum "C" grade, and 6 credits of university-transferable English or Communications with a minimum "C" grade; and a minimum "C" grade in CMNS 2228.

More Information »

PHOT 1100 Photographic Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 4.0

This course introduces novice to beginner photographers to the basics of photography. They will build their photographic expertise and techniques through a variety of hands-on projects including the opportunity to choose an area of interest for a term project.

Note: This course is open to all Langara College students.

More Information »

PUBL 1220 Web Design Fundamentals
6

Lecture Hours: 8.0 | Seminar: 4.0 | Lab: 4.0

Students will learn to write standards-compliant HTML and CSS and author websites that "respond" to modern devices or browsers and degrade gracefully in older ones. Modern approaches to web typography and graphics will figure prominently.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in PUBL 1120 and PUBL 1124, or a minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1250 and DSGN 1255.

More Information »

or another course with the prior approval of the Department Chair.
3

Program Option Notes:

  1. The ENGL/CMNS for the program may be taken in any semester, including the summer semester. The ENGL/CMNS requirement can be met by completing six credits from the following:
    university-transfer credit offerings of the English Department, CMNS 1115, and/or CMNS 1118.
  2. The prerequisite for DSGN 2254 is a GPA of 3.00 in Term Three. In the absence of the 3.00 GPA, consideration may be given by faculty and the Department Chair.
  3. The electives for the program may be taken in any semester, including the summer semester.