Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The Associate of Arts Degree program with a concentration in Classical Studies gives students an opportunity to study many aspects of the civilizations of Greece and Rome.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
CLST 1110 Introduction to Greek Civilization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the golden age of Athens, with an emphasis on history and society, literature, philosophy, art and archaeology.For related courses see: CLST 1102, 1120, 2230 and HIST 2210.

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CLST 1120 Introduction to Roman Civilization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the events of the golden age of Rome, at the end of the Republic and the beginning of the Empire, with an emphasis on the history and society, literature, philosophy, art and archaeology.For related courses see: CLST 1102, 1110, 2230 and HIST 2211.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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One of
GREK 1115 Introductory Greek I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to Ancient Greek. The elements of the language. Simple readings. This course will prove especially useful to students of Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Religious Studies, and Romance Languages.Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.

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GREK 1215 Introductory Greek II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A continuation of GREK 1115 with readings in prose. This course will prove especially useful to students of Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Religious Studies, and Romance Languages.Prerequisite(s): GREK 1115.

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HIST 2210 Ancient Greece
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Greece in the Bronze Age; the evolution of government and society; the rise and fall of the Athenian Empire; Macedon and Alexander the Great; how the Greeks remembered their past. This course is taught at a second year level, but there is no prerequisite.

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HIST 2211 Ancient Rome
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Early Rome and its foundation. The republic, with emphasis upon the evolution of government and pressure of war. The fall of the republican government and the triumph of Augustus. The developed Empire and the Pax Romana. Decline and fall. This course is taught at a second year level, but there is no prerequisite.

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LATN 1115 Beginner's Latin I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the nature and structure of the Latin language; reading of simple texts. This course will be especially interesting to students in Classical Studies, Medieval History, Comparative Literature, the Romance languages, Religious Studies, and Philosophy. It will also be useful to students in the Sciences.

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LATN 1117 Beginner's Latin II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the nature and structure of the Latin language; reading of simple texts. This course will be especially interesting to students in Classical Studies, Medieval History, Comparative Literature, the Romance languages, Religious Studies, and Philosophy. It will also be useful to students in the Sciences.Prerequisite(s): LATN 1115, or instructor's permission.

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Four of
AHIS 1114 Western Art: Prehistory to the Renaissance
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a chronological survey of western painting, sculpture and architecture from Prehistory to the Renaissance. Art works will be studied in the context of the political, economic and social developments of each period.

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AHIS 1214 Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course familiarizes students with the chronological approach to the history of art from the Renaissance through Baroque, Rococo and 19th century to the modern and postmodern periods. Art works will be examined in relation to relevant political, economic and social factors of each historical period.

More Information »

ANTH 1170 An Introduction to Myth and Folklore
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the area of mythology, folklore and legend. Topics include types of myths, their functions in culture, theoretical approaches to their study, and a discussion of modern mythology. The student will be given a broad perspective of an important part of world view.

More Information »

ANTH 2250 Anthropology of Religion
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course offers students a comparative, cross-cultural investigation of religious beliefs, teachings, practices, and movements; and several theoretical approaches to explore the relationships between religion, culture and the individual.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, SOCI 1121, or RELS 1110.

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CLST 1102 Women in Antiquity
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An overview of women in Greece and Rome, based primarily on literary texts. The images of women in these texts will be studied, and compared to reality as we know it from other sources. For related courses, see HIST 2210, HIST 2211, CLST 1110 and CLST 1120.

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CLST 2230 Alexander and the Hellenistic World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

An overview of the history and culture of the Hellenistic world, from the conquests of Alexander the Great to the death of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. Topics will include the empire of Alexander and the successor states, the cultural achievements of the Hellenistic world, and the interaction between Greek and non-Greek in this expanded world.Prerequisite(s): At least one course in one of the following disciplines: classical studies, history, art history, or philosophy; or permission of the instructor or classical studies coordinator.

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CLST 2276 Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of Greek painting, sculpture and architecture from the Minoan to the Hellenistic period, and an examination of Roman art from the Etruscan age to the Roman Imperial period. Emphasis is placed on the Greek Classical period and the Roman empire. Archaeological evidence will be studied in the context of the political, economic and social developments of the periods. Course content will include the history, principles, aims and techniques of Classical Archaeology, and the relationship of the archaeological evidence to the literary and other sources.Prerequisite(s): At least one course in art history, classical studies, anthropology, or history; or permission of instructor or classical studies coordinator.

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ENGL 1181 History of Drama and Theatre I 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a study of drama and theatre history of the Primitive, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance periods. Students will be given a combination of written and oral assignments.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 2237 Exploring Literature 2
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines one genre, theme, or national literature. Contents vary with instructor and semester. Check the Registration Guide and Course Schedule each semester for details. Term papers and extensive reading are required.Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; and one of ENGL 1129 or 1130 or equivalent.

More Information »

HIST 1113 History of the Early Medieval World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the most significant aspects of early Medieval History from the decline of Rome to about the year 1000 A.D. Special attention will be given to the development of characteristic institutions and ideas in this period. The course will focus upon the disintegration of the classical world and the genesis of a new form of civilization in Europe. Special attention will be given to the new order created in Western Europe at the time of Charlemagne and his immediate successors.

More Information »

HIST 1114 Renaissance and Reformation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The development of the political thought, religion, science, economics, and culture of the Western World from the Italian Renaissance to the mid-eighteenth century. An introductory course recommended as the basis for studies in Modern History. In all fields, Western Europe was characterized by a greater secularization and this forms one of the major themes of this course.

More Information »

HIST 1123 History of the Late Medieval World
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the most pertinent aspects of the late Medieval World from about the year 1000 A.D. until the Italian Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the development of institutions and ideas in this period, particularly the twelfth century revival of learning and its aftermath.

More Information »

HIST 1190 Greece: History and Monuments
3

Lecture Hours: 20.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the history, people, and monuments of Greece, covering a range of historical eras, including Mycenaean, Classical, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader, Turkish, and early independence. This is an intensive 25 day course, 21 days of which will be field studies in London and Greece.Prerequisite(s): Enrolment limited to students of the Study in Greece program.

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HIST 2236 The Franks:From Barbarian Trb to Imprl Mission-the Destiny of the Merovingians and the Carolingians
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Franks first appear in historical sources during the third century A.D. as a group of undistinguished barbarians living in the lowlands north and east of the Rhine frontier of the Roman Empire. From this undistinguished beginning, they created the most powerful of all the barbarian kingdoms and became the effective heirs of the Roman Empire. In 800, a Frank was crowned in Rome as the first emperor of Germanic origins. Utilizing contemporary documents and archaeological evidence, this course traces the history of the Franks from barbarism to their military and civil dominance of western Europe.

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HIST 2237 Popes, Emperors and Kings: Aspects of the History of Medieval Political Theory
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The concept of the separation of church and state - indeed, the idea of the modern state itself - grew out of a struggle between the kings, emperors and popes of medieval Europe. The polemics and the developments in law derived from the crucial medieval debate have left their imprint on the course of Western history. This course will discuss such vital issues as the nature of authority, justice, and property; the problem of legitimacy, allegiance, the right of resistance to the powers that be; and the character and function of law. These concepts form the very foundation of western societies and the medieval debate is relevant to an understanding of contemporary institution and ideas.Prerequisite(s): Any History course.

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LATN 1101 Latin and Greek Roots
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the meanings and uses of Greek and Latin root words in the English language. Students of all disciplines will find this a practical means of enhancing their comprehension and extending their application of English. They will master the meaning and spelling of technical vocabulary in a wide range of academic subjects while they learn to appreciate and enjoy language and its subtleties.

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LATN 2225 Intermediate Latin I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a continuation of LATN 1117. Students will continue to learn Latin grammar, and at the same time will begin to read Latin prose and poetry.Prerequisite(s): LATN 1117 or instructor's permission

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LATN 2227 Intermediate Latin II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a continuation of LATN 2225. Greater emphasis will be put on reading Latin prose and poetry: Cicero and Catullus and others.Prerequisite(s): LATN 2225, or instructor's permission.

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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy) 3
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1101 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality 4
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The primary questions dealt with are "What is the source and the limit of human knowledge?" and "What is the nature of reality?" and "What is our place in nature?" Some of the major themes discussed are knowing and believing, mind and brain, free will and determinism, truth, existence.

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RELS 1230 The Evolution of Early Christian Thought and Spirituality
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An enquiry into the cultural roots of western Christian civilization focusing on its Jewish, Greek, Roman, and Persian antecedents and its evolution during the first four centuries of our era. Attention is given to present day issues such as biblical criticism as well as Third World political and economic factors challenging traditional beliefs. Special focus is given to Jesus the Jew and to the problem of anti-Semitism in the early church.

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* and other such relevant courses that may be offered from time to time.

 
Registration and attendance for one semester in CLST 1105 (0 credit), a weekly colloquium on classical topics.
 

The Diploma in Arts and Science (Classical Studies) program gives students an opportunity to study many aspects of the civilizations of Greece and Rome.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Diploma in Arts and Science, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
CLST 1110 Introduction to Greek Civilization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the golden age of Athens, with an emphasis on history and society, literature, philosophy, art and archaeology.For related courses see: CLST 1102, 1120, 2230 and HIST 2210.

More Information »

CLST 1120 Introduction to Roman Civilization
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the events of the golden age of Rome, at the end of the Republic and the beginning of the Empire, with an emphasis on the history and society, literature, philosophy, art and archaeology.For related courses see: CLST 1102, 1110, 2230 and HIST 2211.

More Information »

One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

More Information »

ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

More Information »

One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

One of
GREK 1115 Introductory Greek I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to Ancient Greek. The elements of the language. Simple readings. This course will prove especially useful to students of Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Religious Studies, and Romance Languages.Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.

More Information »

GREK 1215 Introductory Greek II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A continuation of GREK 1115 with readings in prose. This course will prove especially useful to students of Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Religious Studies, and Romance Languages.Prerequisite(s): GREK 1115.

More Information »

HIST 2210 Ancient Greece
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Greece in the Bronze Age; the evolution of government and society; the rise and fall of the Athenian Empire; Macedon and Alexander the Great; how the Greeks remembered their past. This course is taught at a second year level, but there is no prerequisite.

More Information »

HIST 2211 Ancient Rome
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Early Rome and its foundation. The republic, with emphasis upon the evolution of government and pressure of war. The fall of the republican government and the triumph of Augustus. The developed Empire and the Pax Romana. Decline and fall. This course is taught at a second year level, but there is no prerequisite.

More Information »

LATN 1115 Beginner's Latin I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the nature and structure of the Latin language; reading of simple texts. This course will be especially interesting to students in Classical Studies, Medieval History, Comparative Literature, the Romance languages, Religious Studies, and Philosophy. It will also be useful to students in the Sciences.

More Information »

LATN 1117 Beginner's Latin II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the nature and structure of the Latin language; reading of simple texts. This course will be especially interesting to students in Classical Studies, Medieval History, Comparative Literature, the Romance languages, Religious Studies, and Philosophy. It will also be useful to students in the Sciences.Prerequisite(s): LATN 1115, or instructor's permission.

More Information »

Four of
AHIS 1114 Western Art: Prehistory to the Renaissance
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a chronological survey of western painting, sculpture and architecture from Prehistory to the Renaissance. Art works will be studied in the context of the political, economic and social developments of each period.

More Information »

AHIS 1214 Western Art: Renaissance to the Present
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course familiarizes students with the chronological approach to the history of art from the Renaissance through Baroque, Rococo and 19th century to the modern and postmodern periods. Art works will be examined in relation to relevant political, economic and social factors of each historical period.

More Information »

ANTH 1170 An Introduction to Myth and Folklore
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the area of mythology, folklore and legend. Topics include types of myths, their functions in culture, theoretical approaches to their study, and a discussion of modern mythology. The student will be given a broad perspective of an important part of world view.

More Information »

ANTH 2250 Anthropology of Religion
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course offers students a comparative, cross-cultural investigation of religious beliefs, teachings, practices, and movements; and several theoretical approaches to explore the relationships between religion, culture and the individual.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, SOCI 1121, or RELS 1110.

More Information »

CLST 1102 Women in Antiquity
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An overview of women in Greece and Rome, based primarily on literary texts. The images of women in these texts will be studied, and compared to reality as we know it from other sources. For related courses, see HIST 2210, HIST 2211, CLST 1110 and CLST 1120.

More Information »

CLST 2230 Alexander and the Hellenistic World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

An overview of the history and culture of the Hellenistic world, from the conquests of Alexander the Great to the death of Cleopatra VII of Egypt. Topics will include the empire of Alexander and the successor states, the cultural achievements of the Hellenistic world, and the interaction between Greek and non-Greek in this expanded world.Prerequisite(s): At least one course in one of the following disciplines: classical studies, history, art history, or philosophy; or permission of the instructor or classical studies coordinator.

More Information »

CLST 2276 Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of Greek painting, sculpture and architecture from the Minoan to the Hellenistic period, and an examination of Roman art from the Etruscan age to the Roman Imperial period. Emphasis is placed on the Greek Classical period and the Roman empire. Archaeological evidence will be studied in the context of the political, economic and social developments of the periods. Course content will include the history, principles, aims and techniques of Classical Archaeology, and the relationship of the archaeological evidence to the literary and other sources.Prerequisite(s): At least one course in art history, classical studies, anthropology, or history; or permission of instructor or classical studies coordinator.

More Information »

ENGL 1181 History of Drama and Theatre I 1
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a study of drama and theatre history of the Primitive, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance periods. Students will be given a combination of written and oral assignments.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 2237 Exploring Literature 2
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines one genre, theme, or national literature. Contents vary with instructor and semester. Check the Registration Guide and Course Schedule each semester for details. Term papers and extensive reading are required.Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; and one of ENGL 1129 or 1130 or equivalent.

More Information »

HIST 1113 History of the Early Medieval World
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the most significant aspects of early Medieval History from the decline of Rome to about the year 1000 A.D. Special attention will be given to the development of characteristic institutions and ideas in this period. The course will focus upon the disintegration of the classical world and the genesis of a new form of civilization in Europe. Special attention will be given to the new order created in Western Europe at the time of Charlemagne and his immediate successors.

More Information »

HIST 1114 Renaissance and Reformation
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The development of the political thought, religion, science, economics, and culture of the Western World from the Italian Renaissance to the mid-eighteenth century. An introductory course recommended as the basis for studies in Modern History. In all fields, Western Europe was characterized by a greater secularization and this forms one of the major themes of this course.

More Information »

HIST 1123 History of the Late Medieval World
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the most pertinent aspects of the late Medieval World from about the year 1000 A.D. until the Italian Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the development of institutions and ideas in this period, particularly the twelfth century revival of learning and its aftermath.

More Information »

HIST 1190 Greece: History and Monuments
3

Lecture Hours: 20.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the history, people, and monuments of Greece, covering a range of historical eras, including Mycenaean, Classical, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader, Turkish, and early independence. This is an intensive 25 day course, 21 days of which will be field studies in London and Greece.Prerequisite(s): Enrolment limited to students of the Study in Greece program.

More Information »

HIST 2236 The Franks:From Barbarian Trb to Imprl Mission-the Destiny of the Merovingians and the Carolingians
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Franks first appear in historical sources during the third century A.D. as a group of undistinguished barbarians living in the lowlands north and east of the Rhine frontier of the Roman Empire. From this undistinguished beginning, they created the most powerful of all the barbarian kingdoms and became the effective heirs of the Roman Empire. In 800, a Frank was crowned in Rome as the first emperor of Germanic origins. Utilizing contemporary documents and archaeological evidence, this course traces the history of the Franks from barbarism to their military and civil dominance of western Europe.

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HIST 2237 Popes, Emperors and Kings: Aspects of the History of Medieval Political Theory
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The concept of the separation of church and state - indeed, the idea of the modern state itself - grew out of a struggle between the kings, emperors and popes of medieval Europe. The polemics and the developments in law derived from the crucial medieval debate have left their imprint on the course of Western history. This course will discuss such vital issues as the nature of authority, justice, and property; the problem of legitimacy, allegiance, the right of resistance to the powers that be; and the character and function of law. These concepts form the very foundation of western societies and the medieval debate is relevant to an understanding of contemporary institution and ideas.Prerequisite(s): Any History course.

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LATN 1101 Latin and Greek Roots
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the meanings and uses of Greek and Latin root words in the English language. Students of all disciplines will find this a practical means of enhancing their comprehension and extending their application of English. They will master the meaning and spelling of technical vocabulary in a wide range of academic subjects while they learn to appreciate and enjoy language and its subtleties.

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LATN 2225 Intermediate Latin I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a continuation of LATN 1117. Students will continue to learn Latin grammar, and at the same time will begin to read Latin prose and poetry.Prerequisite(s): LATN 1117 or instructor's permission

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LATN 2227 Intermediate Latin II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course is a continuation of LATN 2225. Greater emphasis will be put on reading Latin prose and poetry: Cicero and Catullus and others.Prerequisite(s): LATN 2225, or instructor's permission.

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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy) 3
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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PHIL 1101 Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Reality 4
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The primary questions dealt with are "What is the source and the limit of human knowledge?" and "What is the nature of reality?" and "What is our place in nature?" Some of the major themes discussed are knowing and believing, mind and brain, free will and determinism, truth, existence.

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RELS 1230 The Evolution of Early Christian Thought and Spirituality
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An enquiry into the cultural roots of western Christian civilization focusing on its Jewish, Greek, Roman, and Persian antecedents and its evolution during the first four centuries of our era. Attention is given to present day issues such as biblical criticism as well as Third World political and economic factors challenging traditional beliefs. Special focus is given to Jesus the Jew and to the problem of anti-Semitism in the early church.

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* and other such relevant courses that may be offered from time to time.

 
Registration and attendance for one semester in CLST 1105 (0 credit), a weekly colloquium on classical topics.
 

Program Notes:

For more detailed information contact the Co-ordinator of Classical Studies.