Date: Sep 27, 2021 to Oct 1, 2021
Time: 11:00 AM - 11:55 PM
Website: https://langara.ca/student-services/indigenous-services/orange-shirt-day.html

Truth and Reconciliation Week at snəw̓eyəɬ leləm̓ Langara College is September 27–October 1.

This is an opportunity for all to participate in meaningful conversations about residential schools, colonization and oppression, and to learn more about the TRC Calls to Action focusing on how reconciliation can move forward in a good way.

Schedule of Events:

Monday, September 27

Tuesday, September 28

Wednesday, September 29


Monday, September 27 | 11:00 am–12:00 pm | Truth and Reconciliation Week Opening Ceremony | Register
Join Tsatsu Stalqayu (Coastal Wolf Pack), Special Advisor to the President Gail Sparrow, President and CEO Dr. Lane Trotter, and community as we open Truth and Reconciliation Week in a good way. 


Monday, September 27 | 12:30 pm–2:00 pm | Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action Workshop | Register
What are the TRC Calls to Action? This workshop will go into the history of the TRC and the  commitment to the Calls to Action. It will discuss the historical inequities of Indigenous  communities, the rise and fall of popular discourse around Indigenous Peoples on Turtle Island, and the lack of action and mobility towards the Calls to Action. Participants can expect to have a  better understanding of what it means to be a settler-ally, how they can personify the Calls to Action in their own personal and professional lives, and how to do further investigation and  their own research into how reconciliation can move forward. 

About the facilitator: Conor Kerr is the Executive Director of Indigenous Education & Services at snəw̓eyəɬ leləm. He is Metis/Ukrainian with roots in the Lac Ste. Anne, Papaschase Cree Nation, and from settlers in Treaty 4 territory. 

 

 

 

 


Monday, September 27 | 2:30 pm–4:00 pm | Talking Circle | Register
We invite you to join our virtual Talking Circle, guided by Elder-in-Residence, Nk'xetko. In a talking circle, all are equal and belong. The intention of a talking circle is to open hearts to understand and connect with others; they encourage dialogue, respect, and the co-creation of learning and social discourse.

What you can expect should you join:

  • It is respectful to introduce oneself before speaking.
  • It is important that the circle of people listens respectfully to the person speaking.
  • The person speaking should speak from the heart and shared communications are kept in confidence, especially when someone shares something personal.

In its simplest form, a talking circle is:

  • Done in a complete circle.
  • Only the individual "holding" the talking stick, eagle feather, or other symbolic item speaks while all the rest listen.
  • The item is passed around in a circular direction, a person speaks until they are finished, being respectful of time.
  • The talking circle is complete when everyone has a chance to speak.
  • A person may pass without speaking if they so wish.
  • What is said in the circle stays in the circle.

Tuesday, September 28 | 10:00 am–11:30 am | Employee Only Event: Documentary and Dialogue | Register
Join Natalie Knight and Jennifer Ward for a Documentary and Dialogue session about the Sixties Scoop and its relationship with Indian Residential Schools. This session will unpack how colonization, imperialism, and patriarchy seek to dismantle Indigenous families and communities and dislocate Indigenous peoples from their lands through oppressive policies. Natalie and Jennifer will discuss some of the major themes presented in the documentary followed by a whole group discussion.

Prior to the session: Please login to the Langara Library website and watch Birth of a Family before coming to this event.   

Birth of a Family Synopsis*:
Three sisters and a brother, adopted as infants into separate families across North America, meet together for the first time in this deeply moving documentary by director Tasha Hubbard. Removed from their young Dene mother’s care as part of Canada’s infamous Sixties Scoop, Betty Ann, Esther, Rosalie and Ben were four of the 20,000 Indigenous children taken from their families between 1955 and 1985, to be either adopted into white families or to live in foster care. Now all in middle age, each has grown up in different circumstances, with different family cultures, different values and no shared memories. Birth of a Family follows them through the challenges, trepidations and joys of their first steps towards forming their family. Meeting all together for the first time, they spend a week in Banff, Alberta, sharing what they know about their mother and stories about their lives and the struggles they went through as foster kids and adoptees. As the four siblings piece together their shared history, their connection deepens, bringing laughter with it, and their family begins to take shape. 
*Please note that this documentary can be emotional 

For those in the Langara community who are seeking support, please don’t hesitate to reach out to our Gathering Space at indigenous@langara.ca or Counselling Services. Employees continue to have confidential access to EFAP services and resources, 24/7.


Tuesday, September 28 | 11:00 am–1:00 pm | Being Human Drop-in | In front of the Bookstore
This community art project introduces participants to a story of living with heart, and encourages each person to seek their own personal or community stories which might relate to the pursuit of Truth and Reconciliation, and to reconnect with their Indigenous roots.   

Working with our hands we will create a figure together which may act a template for further community-based projects and inspire place-based art pieces that will involve local stories, artists, youth, and Elders. The tangible process of making opens space for vulnerability, conversation, and connection. 

Where peoples everywhere have lost some vital traditions and teachings they have also kept alive something which can help or inspire others, and might not realize how precious these teachings will be to us all in these troubled times.

We invite you to drop-by our carving site on Tuesday, September 28 between 11:00 am and 1:00 pm to meet the  artists and learn more about how you can get involved.


Tuesday, September 28 | 12:30 pm–2:30 pm | TRC Comic Book Jam | Register
Join Tahltan Comic book artist Cole Pauls for a two-hour comic workshop. Pauls will give a short artist talk and then dive into his comic book making process. Attendees will need 8.5" by 11" white paper, pencil, eraser, a ruler, a fine tip pen (black ink) and a felt tip pen (also black ink) to participate. 

About the facilitator: Cole Pauls is a Tahltan comic artist, illustrator, and printmaker hailing from Haines Junction (Yukon Territory) with a BFA in Illustration from Emily Carr University. Residing in Vancouver, Pauls focuses on his two comic series, the first being Pizza Punks: a self contained comic strip about punks eating pizza, the other being Dakwäkãda Warriors. In 2017, Pauls won Broken Pencil Magazine’s Best Comic and Best Zine of the Year Award for Dakwäkãda Warriors II. In 2020, Dakwäkãda Warriors won Best Work in an Indigenous Language from the Indigenous Voices Awards and was nominated for the Doug Wright Award categories, The Egghead & The Nipper.


Tuesday, September 28 | 1:00 pm–2:30 pm | Land Acknowledgement Workshop | Register
Territorial acknowledgements originally gained traction as a public acknowledgment of the treaties and Indigenous peoples on the land where an event was taking place. Territorial or land acknowledgements are now commonplace and many organizations have templates that can be followed. For many people, these acknowledgements have  become rote or perfunctory, leading some to label them as a hollow or a box-ticking exercise. 

The workshop will lead participants through a series of exercises to develop their own personalized land acknowledgement based on their own experiences, backgrounds, and understanding of colonization and land. This requires active participation and integrates facilitative methods with the theories and insights of Indigenous governance.

About the facilitator: Conor Kerr is the Executive Director of Indigenous Education & Services at snəw̓eyəɬ leləm.  He is Metis/Ukrainian with roots in the Lac Ste. Anne, Papaschase Cree Nation, and from settlers in Treaty 4 territory. 

 

 

 

 


Tuesday, September 28 | 3:00 pm–4:30 pm | Becoming a Change Agent: Understanding Indigenous student demographics and how they affect the current state of post-secondary education | Register
Join Conor Kerr, Executive Director of Indigenous Education and Services, and the Centre for Intercultural Engagement (CIE) for a presentation and discussion on this important topic. 


Wednesday, September 29 | 11:00 am–12:00 pm | Storytime with Tsitsáyxemaat | Register
Join Tsitsayxemaat Rebecca Duncan as she shares her Indigenous knowledge and experience. 

About Tsitsayxemaat Rebecca Duncan:
Tsitsayxemaat Rebecca Duncan is of Squamish and Musqueam descent of the Coast Salish Peoples. Rebecca has devoted her life to preserve the Squamish language, Salish weaving, and cultural teachings that have been handed down to her from her late Papa, and his Papa, and so on, and so on, since the beginning of time.

Rebecca specializes in cultural activities including Language Games (TPR), Traditional Song & Dance, Traditional Cooking, Weaving, Traditional Health & Wellness, Storytelling, and History.

Rebecca has performed worldwide promoting language and culture, representing Coast Salish people and practicing protocols with song and dance, workshops in schools including all the traditional activities, and building healthy relationships with the world!

No matter where you are from, it is so important to know your history, your culture, and your ties to the land.

U Siyam


Wednesday, September 29 | 12:30 pm–2:30 pm | TRC Comic Book Jam | Register
Join Tahltan Comic book artist Cole Pauls for a two-hour comic workshop. Pauls will give a short artist talk and then dive into his comic book making process. Attendees will need 8.5" by 11" white paper, pencil, eraser, a ruler, a fine tip pen (black ink) and a felt tip pen (also black ink) to participate. 

About the facilitator: Cole Pauls is a Tahltan comic artist, illustrator, and printmaker hailing from Haines Junction (Yukon Territory) with a BFA in Illustration from Emily Carr University. Residing in Vancouver, Pauls focuses on his two comic series, the first being Pizza Punks: a self contained comic strip about punks eating pizza, the other being Dakwäkãda Warriors. In 2017, Pauls won Broken Pencil Magazine’s Best Comic and Best Zine of the Year Award for Dakwäkãda Warriors II. In 2020, Dakwäkãda Warriors won Best Work in an Indigenous Language from the Indigenous Voices Awards and was nominated for the Doug Wright Award categories, The Egghead & The Nipper.


Wednesday, September 29 | 1:00 pm–2:00 pm | Employee Only Event: Ask Us Anything...Indigenous | Register
Do you have a burning question about how to Indigenize your course? Maybe you want to think more intentionally about decolonizing your teaching praxis. Or maybe you just have questions about Indigenous histories and contemporary realities. Jennifer Ward and Natalie Knight invite you to come to this one-hour session with your questions. We will do our best to answer all that we can in that hour. 


Wednesday, September 29 | 2:00 pm–3:30 pm | Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action Workshop | Register
What are the TRC Calls to Action? This workshop will go into the history of the TRC and the  commitment to the Calls to Action. It will discuss the historical inequities of Indigenous  communities, the rise and fall of popular discourse around Indigenous Peoples on Turtle Island, and the lack of action and mobility towards the Calls to Action. Participants can expect to have a  better understanding of what it means to be a settler-ally, how they can personify the Calls to Action in their own personal and professional lives, and how to do further investigation and  their own research into how reconciliation can move forward. 


Thursday, September 30 | Orange Shirt Day & National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
Orange Shirt Day happens annually on September 30. This day is an opportunity for all to participate in meaningful conversations about Residential Schools and their impacts on Indigenous peoples’ lives today.


Thursday, September 30 | Intergenerational March to commemorate Orange Shirt Day
A STEM faculty event organized by Applied Science, Land and Food Systems, Science, and Forestry at UBC. Learn more. 


Additional Resources

Self-study Guide for Reconciliation

This guide highlights introductory resources for members of the snəw̓eyəɬ leləm̓ Langara community who are seeking to educate themselves about:

  • Indigenous culture, language, and worldviews, with a focus on Musqueam, upon whose land the Main College campus is located
  • The impact of settler colonialism on the Indigenous peoples of present-day Canada, and Indigenous resistance, resilience, and resurgence
  • Ways to support decolonization and reconciliation in personal and professional contexts moving forward

 Orange Shirt Day Information Page


Stay Connected Online

Follow @LangaraGatheringSpace on Instagram for event updates, important resources, and more. Keep the conversation going with #orangeshirtday2021 #everychildmatters #reconciliation


If you have any questions please email indigenous@langara.ca