Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

This program is for students wishing to pursue further studies in biology at other post-secondary institutions in BC, and is compatible with the Biology Flexible Pre-Major.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Science Degree, students must complete a minimum of 64 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1175, or 1218; or a minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11 (or equivalent), or Anatomy and Physiology 12 (or equivalent); and a minimum "C+" grade in Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217; and one of the following: LET 3, LEAP 8, a minimum "C+" grade in English Studies 12 (or equivalent), Literary Studies 12 (or equivalent), or English First Peoples 12 (or equivalent); or a minimum "C" grade in CMNS 1115, ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128, a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120, or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2330 Introduction to Genetics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

With an emphasis on problem-solving, students explore genetics including mitosis and meiosis; Mendelian genetics; modified Mendelian ratios; sex-linkage; linked genes and chromosome mapping; variations in chromosome number; quantitative and population genetics. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C " or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2316 Organic Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds including hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds; and an introduction to reaction mechanisms, to stereochemistry and to the use of spectroscopy in organic chemistry.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2416 Organic Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include aromatic compounds, alcohols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbonylic acids, amines, and amino acids. Bio-organic systems may also be covered.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2316 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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One of
MATH 1153 Introduction to Calculus I (Part I)
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A course in the fundamentals of differential and integral calculus with their applications, but reviewing many of the basic algebraic and geometric concepts of precalculus mathematics. Topics include algebraic skills, limits, derivatives, curve sketching, optimization, related rates, approximation, antiderivatives and linear motion.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 080); or a minimum "C+" grade in MATH 1152; or a minimum "C-" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1253 Introduction to Calculus I (Part II)
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Study of the calculus concepts introduced in MATH 1153 as they pertain to transcendental functions.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in MATH 1153.

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MATH 1171 Calculus I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with differentiation. The major topics include limits (intuitive approach), development and definition of derivatives, differentiation techniques (algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions), curve sketching, applications of derivatives (optimization, related rates, linear motion, differential approximations), antiderivatives, growth and decay.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "A" grade in Precalculus 12; permission of department based on the MDT process (MDT 95); or a minimum "B-" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1173 Calculus I with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in differential calculus, the study of how quantities change. Topics include limits, the definition and interpretations of the derivative, rules and techniques for computing derivatives, using the derivative to study problems involving rates of change, approximation, graphs, and optimization. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1183. See the description of MATH 1183 for more detail about these activities.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 090); or a minimum "C+" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.Corequisite(s): MATH 1183.

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MATH 1183 Computer Explorations for Calculus I
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1173. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used, and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of ideas being studied in MATH 1173.Corequisite(s): MATH 1173.

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MATH 1174 Calculus I - Economic and Business Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with differentiation. Topics include limits (intuitive approach); development and definition of derivatives; rules for differentiation (algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions); selected applications of derivatives (concentrating on business examples); introduction to antiderivatives.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 085); or a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
MATH 1271 Calculus II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with integration and series. The major topics include the concept of integration, techniques of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): One of MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1273 Calculus II with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in integral calculus, the study of how quantities accumulate. Topics include the definition of the definite integral, interpretations and properties of the integral, techniques for computing integrals, techniques for approximating integrals, applications of integrals, and the study of infinite series. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1283. See the description of MATH 1283 for more detail about these activities.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): MATH 1253 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1173, or permission of the department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.Corequisite(s): MATH 1283.

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MATH 1283 Computer Explorations for Calculus II
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1273. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of the ideas being studied in MATH 1273.Corequisite(s): MATH 1273.

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MATH 1274 Calculus II with Economic and Business Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The indefinite integral and techniques of integration. The definite integral and applications to business, differential equations and probability distributions. Introduction to multi variable calculus.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173, 1174, 1175, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
PHYS 1101 Physics I for Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a calculus-based introductory physics course intended for students planning on a career in the life sciences including biology and the health professions. The course examines, kinematics, including graphs of motion, dynamics, energy, momentum, fluids, oscillations, waves, sound, heat, thermodynamics, geometrical optics and light interference and diffraction, in lectures and laboratories. Examples are chosen, where possible, from applications of interest to students of the life sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of PHYS 1101 or 1125.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in Physics 12 or PHYS 1118, or a satisfactory score on the Physics Diagnostic Test; and a minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173 and 1183, 1175, or 1253 (MATH courses may be taken concurrently).

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PHYS 1125 Physics I with Calculus
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a calculus-based introduction to mechanics. The course examines kinematics (one and two dimensions), dynamics, statics, energy, rotation, waves, oscillations, fluids, gas, heat, thermodynamics in lectures and laboratories. Students planning to go into physical and applied sciences are encouraged to take this course and its second part, PHYS 1225.Students will receive credit for only one of PHYS 1101 or 1125.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Physics 12, a minimum "C" grade in PHYS 1118, or a satisfactory score on the Physics Diagnostic Test; and a minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173 and 1183, 1175, or 1253 (MATH courses may be taken concurrently).

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Two of
BIOL 2260 Introduction to Plant and Animal Physiology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students explore the principles of cellular and organismal physiology by comparing and contrasting the ways that plants and animals have evolved to overcome the problems of being complex multicellular organisms. The major functions explored include transport processes, nutrient and energy acquisition, water balance, communication, and responses to the environment. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1215.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2350 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

In an integrative lecture and lab approach, students investigate the anatomical complexity of vertebrates, exploring their development, classification, structure, function, and evolution. Students also develop dissection skills and become proficient in the use of microscopes to study tissues. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215 or a minimum "C+" grade in any second-year biology course; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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BIOL 3430 Molecular Genetics
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Building on fundamental knowledge of biology and genetics, students further explore life at the molecular level, specifically, the structure and function of nucleic acids, DNA replication and expression, gene structure and regulation. Topics include fundamental concepts in recombinant DNA technology, cloning and sequencing techniques and their application to the analysis of genes and geonomes. The use of computer-based manipulation and analysis of DNA sequence information as an essential tool in modern molecular genetics is also emphasized.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.Students will only receive credit for one of BIOL 2430 and 3430.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 2330.

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CHEM 2222 Analytical Chemistry
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 4.0

Introduction to qualitative and quantitative chemical analytical techniques and statistical analysis of data.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2250 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This second-year level Chemistry course builds on a first-year knowledge of chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and thermodynamics. This course is required for second-year biology and is useful in a variety of fields such as agriculture, medicine and earth sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 2210 and 2250.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 and one of the following: MATH 1171, 1174, 1253, or the combination of MATH 1173 and 1183. MATH 1271 or the combination of MATH 1273 and 1283 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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PHYS 1118 Introductory Physics
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introductory course for students with Physics 11 or equivalent. The course covers mechanics (Newton's laws), energy, momentum, geometrical optics, and electricity; use of graphs and vectors in physics; and laboratory exercises to familiarize the students with physical phenomena and instruments.Prerequisite(s): Physics 11 with a "B" or higher, or Physics 12 with "C" or higher, or PHYS 1114 with "C" or higher, or satisfactory score on Physics Diagnostic Test, and Precalculus 12 with a "C" or higher, or MATH 1152 with a grade of "C" or higher, or MATH 1153 with "C-" or higher, or MATH 1170 "C-" or higher (concurrent).

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PHYS 1225 Physics II with Calculus
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a calculus-based introduction to electricity. The course examines electrostatics, electric field, electric current, circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, oscillations, alternating current, sound, optics, interference and diffraction, modern physics.Note: Students taking second year Physics courses are advised to take MATH 2362, 2371, 2471, and 2475.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in PHYS 1101, or a minimum "C" grade in PHYS 1125; and a minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1271, 1273 and 1283, or 1275 (MATH courses may be taken concurrently).

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Two of
first-or second-year arts other than ENGL (excluding MATH and laboratory-based science courses)
6

Term Notes:

The Associate of Science Degree in Biology is designed for efficient transfer to UBC and SFU programs in biology. Other biology-related programs, such as microbiology, biochemistry, plant science, etc. may have unique course requirements in first-and second-year. Students should consult with the institution offering these programs to determine which university-transfer courses to take at Langara.

This program is for students wishing to pursue further studies in Biology at other post-secondary institutions in BC, and is compatible with the Biology Flexible Pre-Major.

The program enables students to integrate academic studies with related, practical work experience. Co-Op students alternate terms of classroom studies with terms of paid, full-time employment with a participating employer.

Also see Co-operative Education programs.

Total Credits: 70

Courses Credits
All of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1175, or 1218; or a minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11 (or equivalent), or Anatomy and Physiology 12 (or equivalent); and a minimum "C+" grade in Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217; and one of the following: LET 3, LEAP 8, a minimum "C+" grade in English Studies 12 (or equivalent), Literary Studies 12 (or equivalent), or English First Peoples 12 (or equivalent); or a minimum "C" grade in CMNS 1115, ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128, a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120, or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2330 Introduction to Genetics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

With an emphasis on problem-solving, students explore genetics including mitosis and meiosis; Mendelian genetics; modified Mendelian ratios; sex-linkage; linked genes and chromosome mapping; variations in chromosome number; quantitative and population genetics. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C " or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2316 Organic Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include simple aliphatic and aromatic compounds including hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, organometallic compounds; and an introduction to reaction mechanisms, to stereochemistry and to the use of spectroscopy in organic chemistry.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2416 Organic Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A second-year level course in general organic chemistry. Topics include aromatic compounds, alcohols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, carbonylic acids, amines, and amino acids. Bio-organic systems may also be covered.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2316 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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COOP 2301 Co-operative Work Placement I
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 22.5

Work experience and report. Practical application of theoretical knowledge gained in academic studies to enhance skills and to provide professional and personal development. Co-op work placements consist of full time work in a student's area of study. Evaluation will consist of employer evaluation, work term report, and presentation.Co-operative Education courses cannot be used to meet elective requirements.Students will only receive credit for COOP 2301, or COOP 2302 and 2303.Prerequisite(s): Minimum "C" grade in BUSM 2300, COOP 2300, or EXPE 2300; minimum 2.6 GPA; acceptance to the co-op option; and confirmed co-op work placement.

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EXPE 2300 Employment Strategies for Current Labour Markets
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

EXPE 2300 is a combined lecture/seminar course that will provide students with knowledge of what it takes to get a job in today's constantly changing workplace. This course will give students a chance to learn as well as practice each of the steps towards attaining a job, including self-assessment; resume and cover letter writing; networking and interviewing skills; as well as job search tactics. By completing this course, each student will have the resources to make a positive, lasting impression on prospective employers. This course complements other curriculum already offered in career programs with the Co-operative Education option and is designed to further develop specific competencies related to employment in the student's field of study. The final project is to produce a professional career portfolio. 9Students will receive credit for only one of BUSM 2300, COOP 2300, and EXPE 2300.Note: This course a prerequiste for participation in Co-operative Education.Prerequisite(s): English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in English Studies 12 or equivalent; a minimum 67% in Literary Studies 12; a minimum 67% in English First Peoples 12; a minimum "C-" in a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

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ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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One of
MATH 1153 Introduction to Calculus I (Part I)
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A course in the fundamentals of differential and integral calculus with their applications, but reviewing many of the basic algebraic and geometric concepts of precalculus mathematics. Topics include algebraic skills, limits, derivatives, curve sketching, optimization, related rates, approximation, antiderivatives and linear motion.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 080); or a minimum "C+" grade in MATH 1152; or a minimum "C-" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1253 Introduction to Calculus I (Part II)
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Study of the calculus concepts introduced in MATH 1153 as they pertain to transcendental functions.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in MATH 1153.

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MATH 1171 Calculus I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with differentiation. The major topics include limits (intuitive approach), development and definition of derivatives, differentiation techniques (algebraic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions), curve sketching, applications of derivatives (optimization, related rates, linear motion, differential approximations), antiderivatives, growth and decay.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "A" grade in Precalculus 12; permission of department based on the MDT process (MDT 95); or a minimum "B-" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1173 Calculus I with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in differential calculus, the study of how quantities change. Topics include limits, the definition and interpretations of the derivative, rules and techniques for computing derivatives, using the derivative to study problems involving rates of change, approximation, graphs, and optimization. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1183. See the description of MATH 1183 for more detail about these activities.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 090); or a minimum "C+" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.Corequisite(s): MATH 1183.

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MATH 1183 Computer Explorations for Calculus I
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1173. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used, and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of ideas being studied in MATH 1173.Corequisite(s): MATH 1173.

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MATH 1174 Calculus I - Economic and Business Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with differentiation. Topics include limits (intuitive approach); development and definition of derivatives; rules for differentiation (algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions); selected applications of derivatives (concentrating on business examples); introduction to antiderivatives.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1153/1253, 1171, 1173, 1174, or 1175.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Precalculus 12; or permission of the department based on the MDT process (MDT 085); or a minimum "C" grade in MATH 1170; or a minimum "C+" grade in Precalculus 12 and a minimum "C-" grade in Calculus 12. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
MATH 1271 Calculus II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals primarily with integration and series. The major topics include the concept of integration, techniques of integration, applications of integration, and infinite series.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): One of MATH 1171, 1173, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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MATH 1273 Calculus II with Computer Explorations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a course in integral calculus, the study of how quantities accumulate. Topics include the definition of the definite integral, interpretations and properties of the integral, techniques for computing integrals, techniques for approximating integrals, applications of integrals, and the study of infinite series. Traditional classroom instruction will be augmented with laboratory work in MATH 1283. See the description of MATH 1283 for more detail about these activities.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): MATH 1253 or MATH 1171 or MATH 1173, or permission of the department. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.Corequisite(s): MATH 1283.

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MATH 1283 Computer Explorations for Calculus II
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is the laboratory component of MATH 1273. These laboratory activities will usually involve the use of a Computer Algebra System, will include instruction about the computers and the software being used and will involve activities designed to promote better understanding of the ideas being studied in MATH 1273.Corequisite(s): MATH 1273.

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MATH 1274 Calculus II with Economic and Business Applications
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The indefinite integral and techniques of integration. The definite integral and applications to business, differential equations and probability distributions. Introduction to multi variable calculus.Students will receive credit for only one of MATH 1271, 1273, 1274, or 1275.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173, 1174, 1175, or 1253. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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PHYS 1101 Physics I for Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a calculus-based introductory physics course intended for students planning on a career in the life sciences including biology and the health professions. The course examines, kinematics, including graphs of motion, dynamics, energy, momentum, fluids, oscillations, waves, sound, heat, thermodynamics, geometrical optics and light interference and diffraction, in lectures and laboratories. Examples are chosen, where possible, from applications of interest to students of the life sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of PHYS 1101 or 1125.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in Physics 12 or PHYS 1118, or a satisfactory score on the Physics Diagnostic Test; and a minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173 and 1183, 1175, or 1253 (MATH courses may be taken concurrently).

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PHYS 1125 Physics I with Calculus
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a calculus-based introduction to mechanics. The course examines kinematics (one and two dimensions), dynamics, statics, energy, rotation, waves, oscillations, fluids, gas, heat, thermodynamics in lectures and laboratories. Students planning to go into physical and applied sciences are encouraged to take this course and its second part, PHYS 1225.Students will receive credit for only one of PHYS 1101 or 1125.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in Physics 12, a minimum "C" grade in PHYS 1118, or a satisfactory score on the Physics Diagnostic Test; and a minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1171, 1173 and 1183, 1175, or 1253 (MATH courses may be taken concurrently).

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Two of
BIOL 2260 Introduction to Plant and Animal Physiology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students explore the principles of cellular and organismal physiology by comparing and contrasting the ways that plants and animals have evolved to overcome the problems of being complex multicellular organisms. The major functions explored include transport processes, nutrient and energy acquisition, water balance, communication, and responses to the environment. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1215.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2350 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

In an integrative lecture and lab approach, students investigate the anatomical complexity of vertebrates, exploring their development, classification, structure, function, and evolution. Students also develop dissection skills and become proficient in the use of microscopes to study tissues. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215 or a minimum "C+" grade in any second-year biology course; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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BIOL 3430 Molecular Genetics
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Building on fundamental knowledge of biology and genetics, students further explore life at the molecular level, specifically, the structure and function of nucleic acids, DNA replication and expression, gene structure and regulation. Topics include fundamental concepts in recombinant DNA technology, cloning and sequencing techniques and their application to the analysis of genes and geonomes. The use of computer-based manipulation and analysis of DNA sequence information as an essential tool in modern molecular genetics is also emphasized.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.Students will only receive credit for one of BIOL 2430 and 3430.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 2330.

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CHEM 2222 Analytical Chemistry
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 4.0

Introduction to qualitative and quantitative chemical analytical techniques and statistical analysis of data.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 or equivalent. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 2250 Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This second-year level Chemistry course builds on a first-year knowledge of chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, and thermodynamics. This course is required for second-year biology and is useful in a variety of fields such as agriculture, medicine and earth sciences.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 2210 and 2250.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1220 and one of the following: MATH 1171, 1174, 1253, or the combination of MATH 1173 and 1183. MATH 1271 or the combination of MATH 1273 and 1283 is recommended. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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PHYS 1118 Introductory Physics
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

An introductory course for students with Physics 11 or equivalent. The course covers mechanics (Newton's laws), energy, momentum, geometrical optics, and electricity; use of graphs and vectors in physics; and laboratory exercises to familiarize the students with physical phenomena and instruments.Prerequisite(s): Physics 11 with a "B" or higher, or Physics 12 with "C" or higher, or PHYS 1114 with "C" or higher, or satisfactory score on Physics Diagnostic Test, and Precalculus 12 with a "C" or higher, or MATH 1152 with a grade of "C" or higher, or MATH 1153 with "C-" or higher, or MATH 1170 "C-" or higher (concurrent).

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PHYS 1225 Physics II with Calculus
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This is a calculus-based introduction to electricity. The course examines electrostatics, electric field, electric current, circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, oscillations, alternating current, sound, optics, interference and diffraction, modern physics.Note: Students taking second year Physics courses are advised to take MATH 2362, 2371, 2471, and 2475.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B" grade in PHYS 1101, or a minimum "C" grade in PHYS 1125; and a minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: MATH 1271, 1273 and 1283, or 1275 (MATH courses may be taken concurrently).

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Two of
first-or second-year arts other than ENGL (excluding MATH and laboratory-based science courses)
6

The Diploma in Biology is designed for students who wish to focus their two years of science study at Langara in Biology. It is intended to give students a solid foundation for further study in biology and to provide strong laboratory and field skills. For students pursuing further study in biology, the diploma also allows for maximum flexibility in designing their curriculum to meet the program requirements at other institutions where the Biology Flexible Pre-Major does not apply.

CURRICULUM

Students must complete a minimum of 61 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1175, or 1218; or a minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11 (or equivalent), or Anatomy and Physiology 12 (or equivalent); and a minimum "C+" grade in Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217; and one of the following: LET 3, LEAP 8, a minimum "C+" grade in English Studies 12 (or equivalent), Literary Studies 12 (or equivalent), or English First Peoples 12 (or equivalent); or a minimum "C" grade in CMNS 1115, ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128, a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120, or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C " or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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Five of
BIOL 2260 Introduction to Plant and Animal Physiology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students explore the principles of cellular and organismal physiology by comparing and contrasting the ways that plants and animals have evolved to overcome the problems of being complex multicellular organisms. The major functions explored include transport processes, nutrient and energy acquisition, water balance, communication, and responses to the environment. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1215.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2330 Introduction to Genetics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

With an emphasis on problem-solving, students explore genetics including mitosis and meiosis; Mendelian genetics; modified Mendelian ratios; sex-linkage; linked genes and chromosome mapping; variations in chromosome number; quantitative and population genetics. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2350 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

In an integrative lecture and lab approach, students investigate the anatomical complexity of vertebrates, exploring their development, classification, structure, function, and evolution. Students also develop dissection skills and become proficient in the use of microscopes to study tissues. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215 or a minimum "C+" grade in any second-year biology course; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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BIOL 3430 Molecular Genetics
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Building on fundamental knowledge of biology and genetics, students further explore life at the molecular level, specifically, the structure and function of nucleic acids, DNA replication and expression, gene structure and regulation. Topics include fundamental concepts in recombinant DNA technology, cloning and sequencing techniques and their application to the analysis of genes and geonomes. The use of computer-based manipulation and analysis of DNA sequence information as an essential tool in modern molecular genetics is also emphasized.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.Students will only receive credit for one of BIOL 2430 and 3430.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 2330.

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Two of
first-year university-transferable ENGL courses. Note: SCIE 1113 or SCIE 1114 can replace one of the required ENGL courses.
6
SCIE 1113 Intensive Science Literacy
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

All scientists today must be scientifically literate in order to explain, defend, promote, and analyze the strengths and limitations of science in society. Students in this course develop scientific literacy as they learn to peer review, write, and defend a solid scientific thesis that is supported by their analysis of scientific papers from relevant peer reviewed data. Through active participation, students develop oral and written communications skills important in communicating the wonders and limitations of today's scientific knowledge. The course structure includes student-developed evidence worksheets to analyze the scientific research presented and to contribute to calibrated peer reviews and scientific argumentative essay to support up to three theses focussed on scientifically relevant topics to society. This course meets the same learning objectives of SCIE 1114 but is intended for science students who need less support to meet these learning objectives. This course is restricted to students enrolled in science programs. Students will receive credit for only one of SCIE 1113 and 1114.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3 (or LPI equivalent); IELTS 7; a minimum "B" grade in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the following programs: Associate of Science Degree (general program and all majors), Diploma in Arts and Science (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in General Education (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in Computer Studies, Certificate in Internet & Web Technology, Certificate in Arts & Science (Engineering), Diploma in Human Kinetics, or Diploma in Kinesiology.

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SCIE 1114 Science Literacy
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 3.0 | Lab: 0.0

All scientists today must be scientifically literate in order to explain, defend, promote, and analyze the strengths and limitations of science in society. Students in this course develop scientific literacy as they learn to peer review, write, and defend a solid scientific thesis that is supported by their analysis of scientific papers from relevant peer reviewed data. Through active participation, students develop oral and written communications skills important in communicating the wonders and limitations of today's scientific knowledge. The course structure includes student-developed evidence worksheets to analyze the scientific research presented and to contribute to calibrated peer reviews and scientific argumentative essay to support up to three theses focussed on scientifically relevant topics to society. This course meets the same learning objectives of SCIE 1113 but is intended for science students who need extra support to meet these learning objectives. This course is restricted to students enrolled in science programs.Students will receive credit for only one of SCIE 1113 and 1114.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 2 (or LPI equivalent); IELTS 6.5 (with a minimum score of 6 in each area: listening, reading, writing, and speaking); a minimum "C" grade in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the following programs: Associate of Science Degree (general program and all majors), Diploma in Arts and Science (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in General Education (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in Computer Studies, Certificate in Internet & Web Technology, Certificate in Arts & Science (Engineering), Diploma in Human Kinetics, or Diploma in Kinesiology.

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Two of
first-year university-transferable MATH or STAT courses. Suggested courses are STAT 1123 and one of MATH 1162 or MATH 1170.
6
Four of
university-transferable science electives (may be additional BIOL courses) 3
12-16
Two of
university-transferable arts courses
6

Term Notes:

  1. Students who do not meet the prerequisite requirements for BIOL 1115 are advised to take BIOL 1111 as one of their science electives.
  2. Many degrees in the life sciences require first-year physics and second-year organic chemistry.
  3. Students completing a diploma and transferring to a university in BC should consult with the receiving institutions regarding courses required for entry into specific programs of study.
  4. Total credits for the program may exceed 61 depending on additional prerequisite courses, and the specific combination of science and math courses chosen.

The Diploma in Biology (Co-operative Education) is designed for students who wish to focus their two years of science study at Langara in Biology. It is intended to give students a solid foundation for further study in biology and to provide strong laboratory and field skills. For students pursuing further study in biology, the diploma also allows for maximum flexibility in designing their curriculum to meet the program requirements at other institutions where the Biology Flexible Pre-Major does not apply.

The program enables students to integrate academic studies with related, practical work experience. Co-op students alternate terms of classroom studies with terms of paid, full-time employment with a participating employer.

Also see Co-operative Education Programs.

CURRICULUM

Students must complete a minimum of 67 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
BIOL 1115 General Biology I
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to cell and molecular biology with a strong emphasis on evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include physical and chemical properties of living matter, atoms and molecules, molecular transformations essential to life, biological information flow, cellular structures and functions, cell energetics, cell division, heredity, and population genetics.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BIOL 1111, 1118, 1175, or 1218; or a minimum "C+" grade in Life Sciences 11 (or equivalent), or Anatomy and Physiology 12 (or equivalent); and a minimum "C+" grade in Chemistry 11, CHEM 1114, 1117, or 1217; and one of the following: LET 3, LEAP 8, a minimum "C+" grade in English Studies 12 (or equivalent), Literary Studies 12 (or equivalent), or English First Peoples 12 (or equivalent); or a minimum "C" grade in CMNS 1115, ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128, a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120, or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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BIOL 1215 General Biology II
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students majoring in science are introduced to organismal biology with a strong emphasis on ecology and evolution. Through lectures and laboratories, students acquire the theoretical background and hands-on skills necessary to succeed in upper level biology courses. Topics of study include speciation, phylogenetics, biodiversity (microorganisms, plants, fungi, and animals), and ecology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1115.

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CHEM 1120 General Chemistry I
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

CHEM 1120 constitutes a first-year course in general college chemistry. CHEM 1120 covers quantum chemistry, bonding, absorption of energy by molecules, applications of structure and chemistry in society.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1120 or 1121.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1118 with "C-" or Chem 12 with "A" or "B" or successful score on Chemistry Diagnostic Test. In addition, one of MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C " or MDT 75. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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CHEM 1220 General Chemistry II
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

A first-year course in general chemistry. Topics include solutions, energetics, thermo-dynamics, chemical kinetics, structure, and reactivity.Students will receive credit for only one of CHEM 1220 or 1221.Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1120 with "C-" and MATH 1152 or Precalculus 12 with "C" or MDT 75. A proficiency test administered by the department may be required for students wishing to transfer into CHEM 1220. (MATH 1153 is recommended as a co-requisite). Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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COOP 2301 Co-operative Work Placement I
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 22.5

Work experience and report. Practical application of theoretical knowledge gained in academic studies to enhance skills and to provide professional and personal development. Co-op work placements consist of full time work in a student's area of study. Evaluation will consist of employer evaluation, work term report, and presentation.Co-operative Education courses cannot be used to meet elective requirements.Students will only receive credit for COOP 2301, or COOP 2302 and 2303.Prerequisite(s): Minimum "C" grade in BUSM 2300, COOP 2300, or EXPE 2300; minimum 2.6 GPA; acceptance to the co-op option; and confirmed co-op work placement.

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EXPE 2300 Employment Strategies for Current Labour Markets
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

EXPE 2300 is a combined lecture/seminar course that will provide students with knowledge of what it takes to get a job in today's constantly changing workplace. This course will give students a chance to learn as well as practice each of the steps towards attaining a job, including self-assessment; resume and cover letter writing; networking and interviewing skills; as well as job search tactics. By completing this course, each student will have the resources to make a positive, lasting impression on prospective employers. This course complements other curriculum already offered in career programs with the Co-operative Education option and is designed to further develop specific competencies related to employment in the student's field of study. The final project is to produce a professional career portfolio. 9Students will receive credit for only one of BUSM 2300, COOP 2300, and EXPE 2300.Note: This course a prerequiste for participation in Co-operative Education.Prerequisite(s): English Requirement, one of the following: a minimum 67% in English Studies 12 or equivalent; a minimum 67% in Literary Studies 12; a minimum 67% in English First Peoples 12; a minimum "C-" in a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; a minimum "C-" in ENGL 1121; a "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; a minimum Level 3 on the LET; LEAP 8; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

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Five of
BIOL 2260 Introduction to Plant and Animal Physiology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students explore the principles of cellular and organismal physiology by comparing and contrasting the ways that plants and animals have evolved to overcome the problems of being complex multicellular organisms. The major functions explored include transport processes, nutrient and energy acquisition, water balance, communication, and responses to the environment. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 1215.

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BIOL 2315 Biochemistry
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

This course establishes the foundations for further understanding of biology by covering the fundamental concepts governing biochemistry, with a focus on the structure and function of biomolecules, the process of metabolism, and biological information flow.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; a minimum "C" grade in CHEM 1220; or permission of the instructor. Successful completion or concurrent registration in CHEM 2316 and 2416 is recommended.

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BIOL 2330 Introduction to Genetics
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

With an emphasis on problem-solving, students explore genetics including mitosis and meiosis; Mendelian genetics; modified Mendelian ratios; sex-linkage; linked genes and chromosome mapping; variations in chromosome number; quantitative and population genetics. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2340 Vascular Botany
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

This course examines the diversity and evolutionary relationships of the major groups of extant vascular plants, including lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Students explore key morphological traits, life cycles, reproductive structures, phylogeny, classification, and economic importance of these major groups from an evolutionary perspective.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2350 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

In an integrative lecture and lab approach, students investigate the anatomical complexity of vertebrates, exploring their development, classification, structure, function, and evolution. Students also develop dissection skills and become proficient in the use of microscopes to study tissues. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215 or a minimum "C+" grade in any second-year biology course; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2370 Microbiology I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A general microbiology course designed for students majoring in the biological sciences. Students explore the biology of prokaryotic microorganisms. This includes cell structure, growth, metabolism, gene expression and the mechanisms of genetic variation. Practical aspects include aseptic technique, microscopy and culture techniques.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2380 Introduction to Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Ecology explores the complex relationships between organisms and their environment. Students first develop a foundation in ecological theory, and then apply this theory and quantitative methods to contemporary ecological problems. In the lab, students acquire local natural history knowledge and test ecological hypotheses in the field.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2415 Cell Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Cell biology focuses on the study of cell structure from the molecular level to the whole cell. Students learn the components of the cell and how these components form and function. Students also explore some of the common methods and tools used in Cell biology.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.

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BIOL 2440 Biology of Algae, Bryophytes, and Fungi
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students survey some of the major groups of photoautotrophic organisms including cyanobacteria, algae and bryophytes. They also examine the heterotrophic slime molds and fungi. Major evolutionary themes are covered such as the evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular cells, the theory of endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer, and adaptation to land from a water environment. Emphasis is placed on the evolutionary patterns and processes to explain variations found in their reproductive, life history and growth characteristics. Students participate in a field trip to a regional research station.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2450 Invertebrate Biology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Students examine the invertebrates, including their origins, classification, anatomy, and ecology, and participate in a field trip to a regional research station. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in both BIOL 1115 and 1215; or permission of the instructor.Corequisite(s): BIOL 2105

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BIOL 2470 Microbiology II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students significantly expand their knowledge of biomedically relevant aspects of microbiology with a focus on health and infectious diseases. This second-year course is suitable for students majoring in the biological sciences and can be used as credit for the Associate of Science program. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2370 with minimum "C" grade.

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BIOL 2480 Population Ecology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Population ecology is the study of the factors which affect populations and how and why populations fluctuate over time. Students examine plant and animal population ecology, with emphasis on communities present in North America, population dynamics, interaction, conservation ecology, and modeling. During laboratory hours, students participate in outdoor field trips.Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1215 with a minimum "C" grade. BIOL 2380 is not required as a prerequisite.

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BIOL 3430 Molecular Genetics
4

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 3.0

Building on fundamental knowledge of biology and genetics, students further explore life at the molecular level, specifically, the structure and function of nucleic acids, DNA replication and expression, gene structure and regulation. Topics include fundamental concepts in recombinant DNA technology, cloning and sequencing techniques and their application to the analysis of genes and geonomes. The use of computer-based manipulation and analysis of DNA sequence information as an essential tool in modern molecular genetics is also emphasized.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.Students will only receive credit for one of BIOL 2430 and 3430.Prerequisites(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 2330.

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Two of
first-year university-transferable ENGL courses. Note: SCIE 1113 or SCIE 1114 can replace one of the required ENGL courses.
6
SCIE 1113 Intensive Science Literacy
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

All scientists today must be scientifically literate in order to explain, defend, promote, and analyze the strengths and limitations of science in society. Students in this course develop scientific literacy as they learn to peer review, write, and defend a solid scientific thesis that is supported by their analysis of scientific papers from relevant peer reviewed data. Through active participation, students develop oral and written communications skills important in communicating the wonders and limitations of today's scientific knowledge. The course structure includes student-developed evidence worksheets to analyze the scientific research presented and to contribute to calibrated peer reviews and scientific argumentative essay to support up to three theses focussed on scientifically relevant topics to society. This course meets the same learning objectives of SCIE 1114 but is intended for science students who need less support to meet these learning objectives. This course is restricted to students enrolled in science programs. Students will receive credit for only one of SCIE 1113 and 1114.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 3 (or LPI equivalent); IELTS 7; a minimum "B" grade in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the following programs: Associate of Science Degree (general program and all majors), Diploma in Arts and Science (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in General Education (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in Computer Studies, Certificate in Internet & Web Technology, Certificate in Arts & Science (Engineering), Diploma in Human Kinetics, or Diploma in Kinesiology.

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SCIE 1114 Science Literacy
4

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 3.0 | Lab: 0.0

All scientists today must be scientifically literate in order to explain, defend, promote, and analyze the strengths and limitations of science in society. Students in this course develop scientific literacy as they learn to peer review, write, and defend a solid scientific thesis that is supported by their analysis of scientific papers from relevant peer reviewed data. Through active participation, students develop oral and written communications skills important in communicating the wonders and limitations of today's scientific knowledge. The course structure includes student-developed evidence worksheets to analyze the scientific research presented and to contribute to calibrated peer reviews and scientific argumentative essay to support up to three theses focussed on scientifically relevant topics to society. This course meets the same learning objectives of SCIE 1113 but is intended for science students who need extra support to meet these learning objectives. This course is restricted to students enrolled in science programs.Students will receive credit for only one of SCIE 1113 and 1114.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 2 (or LPI equivalent); IELTS 6.5 (with a minimum score of 6 in each area: listening, reading, writing, and speaking); a minimum "C" grade in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the following programs: Associate of Science Degree (general program and all majors), Diploma in Arts and Science (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in General Education (in Faculty of Science), Diploma in Computer Studies, Certificate in Internet & Web Technology, Certificate in Arts & Science (Engineering), Diploma in Human Kinetics, or Diploma in Kinesiology.

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Two of
first-year university-transferable MATH or STAT courses. Suggested courses are STAT 1123 and one of MATH 1162 or MATH 1170.
6
Four of
university-transferable science electives (may be additional BIOL courses) 3
12-16
Two of
university-transferable arts courses
6

Term Notes:

  1. Students who do not meet the prerequisite requirements for BIOL 1115 are advised to take BIOL 1111 as one of their science electives.
  2. Many degrees in the life sciences require first-year physics and second-year organic chemistry.
  3. Students completing a diploma and transferring to a university in BC should consult with the receiving institutions regarding courses required for entry into specific programs of study.
  4. Total credits for the program may exceed 67 depending on additional prerequisite courses, and the specific combination of science and math courses chosen.