Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The labour market has shifted away from traditional industry and manufacturing toward a knowledge-based economy where individuals with a grounding in social sciences and humanities are sought-after assets. The purpose of the DASSH program is to provide social science and humanities education and related technical skills training necessary to success in a varity of evolving knowledge-based careers, including those in business, law, journalism, government, communications, public administration, the non-profit sector, and information technology and management.

The program comprises a set of core social sciences and humanities courses that teach critical foundational knowledge and skills for an evolving knowledge-based economy and workplace. To facilitate practical translation and application of the core social sciences and humanities education, students acquire technical skills through courses in digital media, software use, and financial literacy. Together, the knowledge and skills produced fall into nine broad categories - communication, critical thinking and problem solving,quantitative fluency, information literacy,ethical reasoning, digital literacy, institutional knowledge, systems thinking, and teamwork and collaboration.

Courses in this diploma program are taught so that students are able to articulate and actively apply the employability skills and knowledge they have acquired. An experiential learning project enables students to apply and showcase their learning. They will graduate with a portfolio demonstrating their knowledge and skills.

Total Credits: 61

Year One

Courses Credits
All of
BCAP 1200 Business Computer Applications I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This is a comprehensive course that provides hands-on computer experience and exposes the student to applications and software packages commonly used in business. A theory-based overview of hardware, software, and computer fundamentals is included.Students will receive credit for only one of BCAP 1200 or CPSC 1000.

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BUSM 1115 Entrepreneurship
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A practical course which introduces the relevant aspects of setting up a small business. These include basic accounting concepts, forms of legal ownership, basic market research, determination of marketing and personnel policies, budgeting, financing, purchasing, promotion, and pricing. Also explored are the personal characteristics of the successful entrepreneur.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 67% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a university-level English or communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit; or a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or a minimum "C-" grade in ENGL 1121, or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. LET with a minimum Level 3; LEAP 8, LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension.

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DASH 1199 Directions in Applied Social Sciences and Humanities
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students are introduced to core concepts and principles that are foundations in applied social sciences and humanities. Emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature of social knowledge through overviews of key disciplines, such as psychology, sociology, political science, geography, philosophy, economics, and business. Students learn through collaborative and teamwork activities and begin to develop an e-portfolio.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Applied Social Sciences and Humanities.

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GEOG 1110 Introduction to Human Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will introduce students to the discipline of human geography. Students will be exposed to the major research traditions in human geography including: population, cultural, political, economic, urban and regional geography, amongst other topics. Throughout the course Vancouver resources and examples will be used to illustrate many of the themes.Students will receive credit for only one of GEOG 1110 and 1170.

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PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy: (Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to a variety of the classic responses to the question "How should I conduct my life?" Some of the major themes discussed are happiness, moral goodness, rights, obligation, freedom.

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POLI 1100 Introduction to Government and Politics
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of government and politics. It examines the major methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; or a minimum "C" grade in three credits of university-transferrable English.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12, or equivalent.

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Three of
University-transferable courses in social sciences and humanities. Refer to the Course Attributes table for a list of social sciences and humanities courses.
9
30 Credits

Year Two

Courses Credits
All of
DASH 2000 E-Portfolio
1

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students design an e-portfolio documenting the achievements, knowledge, and skills acquired throughout the program. The aim of the e-portfolio is to showcase students' work tailored to their career goals and professional identity. Consultation with the instructor to review the status of the portfolio will be scheduled two-three times over the semester. Graded S/U.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Applied Social Sciences and Humanities.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in DASH 1199.

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DASH 2199 Applied Project
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 7.0 | Lab: 0.0

This project-oriented capstone course provides the opportunity to apply the concepts, skills and techniques from the DASSH program curriculum to develop and execute a project for an external partner. Students work closely with each other and their external partner(s) engaging in research, critical thinking, problem solving, project management, structured teamwork and other related skills. Successful completion of the DASSH e-portfolio is also a component of this course.Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Applied Social Sciences and Humanities.Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 46 credits including a minimum "C-" grade in DASH 1199; a minimum "S" grade in DASH 2000; and a minimum "C" grade in one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.

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FMGT 1116 Accounting for Managers
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides an overview of basic financial and management accounting principles and techniques, including the managerial use of financial statements and other financial information for decision-making purposes. Students will initially be introduced to the principles and techniques used in financial accounting. The second part of the course will explore common managerial accounting techniques such as budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and decision-making.Students will receive credit for only one of FMGT 1116 or 4816. FMGT 1116 may not be used to satisfy the FMGT 4816 requirement.Students in the Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting are not permitted to register in this course.

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PSYC 1215 Introduction to Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to theories, methods, and research findings of modern psychology. Topics may include but are not limited to thinking, language, intelligence, personality, emotion, stress and health, motivation, social behavior, and psychological disorders and therapies. PSYC 1115 and 1215 can be taken at the same time or in either order.

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One of
CRIM 1220 Research Methods in Criminology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an overview of research methods typically used in criminology and other social science disciplines. The course will cover both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Topics include the practice of social science research; ethics of research; data gathering strategies; and how to analyze data and present results in a written report. This course does not involve statistical analysis; a background in mathematics is not required.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a score of 4 in Langara English Test (LET); an essay score of 30 or higher on the Language Proficiency Index (LPI) test; or a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1123, 1127, 1128, 1129, or 1130; and a minimum "C" grade in one of the following: CRIM 1115, 1116, 1125, ECON 1119, 1220, 1221, HIST 1116, 1126, PHIL 1100, 1101, POLI 1100, 1119, PSYC 1115, 1215, SOCI 1120, or 1121. Students who do not meet the above prerequisite requirements, but have post-secondary, university-transferable credits or experience may apply to the chair of the Criminal Justice department for permission to take this course.Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Criminal Justice, Diploma in Criminal Justice (BBA Transfer Option), and Diploma in Criminology.

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GEOG 2210 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A laboratory science course that introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students explore the theoretical underpinnings of geographical information science and apply this knowledge to the creation of a map portfolio through labs and a major project. Topics covered include spatial measurement, geodesy, map projections, cartography, and remote sensing. In the lab component, students will utilize GIS software, through various applications and commands, to analyze applied problems in geographically related phenomena.This course is recommended to students interested in using spatial data collection and analysis to solve applied problems within their discipline.

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PSYC 2320 Research Methods in Psychology
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students explore theory and practice of research design, the application of statistics, and the testing of research hypotheses. Students work in groups to complete a research project.Prerequisite: A minimum "C+" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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SOCI 2230 Research Methods in Sociology and Anthropology
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

How do sociologists and anthropologists gather the data that informs our understanding of the social world? Students examine the distinctive quantitative and qualitative approaches used in sociological and anthropological research. Students learn the practical application of research design and data collection techniques by conducting and presenting their own research projects. Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: ANTH 1120, SOCI 1120, 1121, or 1127.

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STAT 1124 Statistical Methods I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

An introductory course in statistics developed through the concept of randomness for students in social sciences, nursing, social work, physiotherapy, business, etc. Topics will include sampling, experimental design, levels of measurement, descriptive statistics, regression, sampling distributions, normal distribution and inferential procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing. This course may be followed by STAT 1224. Students will receive college credit for only one of STAT 1123, 1124, or 1181.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum "C" grade in Foundations of Mathematics 11, Precalculus 11, Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Precalculus 12; an "S" grade in MATH 1150; or MDT 053. Prerequisites are valid for only three years.

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One of
ENVS 2100 Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Applied Environmental Studies: CityStudio introduces local urban environmental topics through which the student develops research, communication, project management and group skills. This cross-disciplinary course will inform and challenge students' perspectives of their world, while providing the opportunity to identify problems and develop solutions. Students' work will be exhibited through a project affiliated with CityStudio.Participation in field trips is required. This core course in the Environmental Studies program is open to students in other disciplines.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: ENGL 1100, 1123, 1127, or 1128; or permission of the instructor or Environmental Studies coordinator.

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GEOG 2275 Applied Human Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

In this applied course, students work as part of the CityStudio Campus Course Network on large-scale projects associated with the City of Vancouver's Healthy City Strategy, Greenest City 2020 Action Plan, or independent projects focused on urban social sustainability. Through experiential learning, students analyze existing problems, use ideas grounded in established geographical principles and theory, and seek to innovate, devise, and implement real-world solutions. Students engage in research and develop critical thinking, problem solving, project management, structured teamwork, and design skills.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in one of the following: GEOG 1110, 1120, 1130, 1150, 1155, 1160, 1170, 2155, 2210, 2230, 2250, 2270, SOCI 1120, 1121, ANTH 1120, or ENVS 2100.

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One of
CPSC 1030 Web Development I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students will examine the structure of the Internet and the World Wide Web and how they work; design and implement professional interactive websites using styles in CSS. Topics include design principles, image manipulation, and simple CGI scripting. Explore innovative trends that use the Internet as a computing platform.Prerequisite(s): None. Basic computer literacy is recommended.

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CPSC 1040 Introduction to Programming
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Introduction to programming with a modern programming language (e.g., Visual Basic NET) in a windowing (e.g., Microsoft Windows) environment. Program development skills including: analyzing a problem to make it amenable to programming; writing structured, modularized programs; program documentation; interacting with the computer operating system; event driven programming interface for GUI applications. Prerequisite(s): None. Basic computer literacy is recommended.

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CPSC 1045 Introduction to Web Programming
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Introduction to programming with a modern programming language (e.g., JavaScript) in a web-based environment. Program development skills including: analyzing a problem to make it amenable to programming; writing structured, modularized programs; program documentation; interacting with the computer operating system; event driven programming for client-side web applications.Prerequisite(s): None. Basic computer literacy is recommended.

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One of
ECON 1220 Principles of Microeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory concepts; the market system; price determination; demand and utility; competitive supply; cost analysis; market structures; equilibrium of the firm; pricing of factor inputs; land rents; wages; interest and capital.Students will receive credit for only one of ECON 1220 or 4800. ECON 1220 may not be used to satisfy the ECON 4800 requirement.

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ECON 1221 Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory macroeconomic concepts; circular flow of income and product; national income; equilibrium level of domestic income; fiscal policy; money and banking; international trade; inflation and unemployment.Students will receive credit for only one of ECON 1221 or 4810. ECON 1221 may not be used to satisfy the ECON 4810 requirement.

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Three of
University-transferable courses in social sciences and humanities numbered 2000 or higher. Refer to the Course Attributes table for a list of social sciences and humanities courses.
9
31 Credits

Program Notes:

  1. Students must complete all courses in the diploma program with a minimum "C-" grade, and an "S" grade in DASH 2000, in order to be eligible for graduation.
  2. Students are advised to check the prerequisites for their chosen elective first- and second-year courses.