Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
Two of
CNST 1110 American Power in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Provides an understanding of contemporary American cultural, economic and political power in Canada and the varied popular and institutional responses. Topics may include the political-economy of Canada - US relations; the free trade agreements and globalization; and American impact on Canadian arts, film and media.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1120 Canadian First Nations' Concerns
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of contemporary First Nations' (Indian, Inuit and Metis) issues. Emphasis placed upon various social, political, economic, anthropological and artistic concerns in terms of the Canadian multicultural perspective.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1130 Work in Canadian Society
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An interdisciplinary study of the concept of work in Canadian society. The problems Canadians encounter in the field of work will be considered from such viewpoints as sociology, history, literature, and philosophy.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1140 Racism and Ethnic Relations in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals with racial and ethnic relations in Canada. It will emphasize social, political and economic analyses of the family, school, workplace, law and media, with special focus on British Columbia.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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CNST 1150 Quebec Nationalism
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Provides an opportunity to understand the origins, development and contemporary nature of Quebec nationalism. The course will examine the social, cultural, political, economic and linguistic manifestations of Quebec nationalism and assess the tensions between Quebec and the rest of Canada. The possibility of meeting Quebecois aspirations within Canada and related special status arrangements will be discussed.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

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All of
ENGL 2225 Canadian Literature
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides a survey of Canadian literature, focusing on a selection of representative works from two or more genres (e.g. poetry, novels, drama, non-fiction prose, etc.). In addition, the course will note some of the characteristic patterns and trends in Canadian literature.

Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128; and one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.


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HIST 1116 Colonies and Conflict: Canada to 1867
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The analysis of early French and English colonies on the eastern coast through the period of colonial rivalry; the relationship between Europeans and First Nations; the British conquest; the conflict of cultures; social, economic, and political developments to 1867. HIST 1116 can be taken before or after HIST 1126 (Modern Canada) or concurrently.

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HIST 1126 Forging a Nation: Canada since 1867
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The social, political, and economic growth of Canada since Confederation. This course will consider such topics as 19th century economic policy, the relationship between First Nations and the emerging Canadian state, the place of Quebec in Canada, women's historical experience, the impact of industrialization, and Canada's relationship to both Britain and the United States. History 1126 can be taken before or after History 1116 (Early Canada) or concurrently.

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One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.

Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127 or 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127, or 1128.

Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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Five of
ANTH 1150 Regional Studies in Anthropology: Pacific Northwest
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to historic indigenous cultures of the Pacific Northwest Coast from northern California to Alaska. This is a survey course that considers the nature of the diversity of the people and cultures of the area from an ethnohistoric perspective. Topics may include subsistence and settlement patterns, language, world view, myth and art forms.

More Information »

ANTH 1180 Aboriginal Cultures of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the origins and development of Interior and Coastal peoples. This survey course will consider the earliest cultural evidence, the development of regional diversity and the indigenous cultures at the time of contact.

More Information »

ECON 1221 Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory macroeconomic concepts; circular flow of income and product; national income; equilibrium level of domestic income; fiscal policy; money and banking; international trade; inflation and unemployment.

More Information »

FREN 1115 Beginner's French I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing French; classroom work supplemented by practice in the Language Laboratory. Introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of French.

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FREN 1215 Beginner's French II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing French; classroom work supplemented by practice in the Language Laboratory. Introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of French.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 1115

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FREN 1205 French Conversational Skills
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

A conversational approach to French to enable students to communicate in everyday authentic situations. Students in FREN 1205 may register concurrently in FREN 1215, 1117 or 1217.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BC French 9 or 10, FREN 1115, 1215, or 1117; or permission of the department. Students with BC French 9 or 10 must contact the department for a prerequisite override. Overqualified students will not be given credit for this course.

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FREN 1117 Intermediate French I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

First-year College French for those who have completed FREN 1215 or Grade 11 French in secondary school, or equivalent. Intermediate grammar, short literary selections and contemporary passages for reading and oral practice are studied. These lessons are supplemented by oral work in the Language Laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): French 11 with a minimum "C" or FREN 1215 with a minimum "C-".

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FREN 1217 Intermediate French II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

First-year College French for those who have completed FREN 1215 or Grade 11 French in secondary school, or equivalent with at least a "C-". Intermediate grammar, short literary selections and contemporary passages for reading and oral practice are studied. These lessons are supplemented by oral work in the Language Laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 1117. Students who obtained a "C-" in FREN 1117 more than a year ago are encouraged to take FREN 1215 concurrently.

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FREN 1118 French Language, Literature and Conversation I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Designed for students who want a less specialized course than FREN 1119/1219. This course offers a cultural overview, a review of grammar, a study of literary texts, and limited practice in conversation. Classroom work is supplemented by work in the Language Laboratory and by computer materials.

Prerequisite(s): French 12 with a minimum "C" grade or FREN 1217.

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FREN 1119 French Language and Literature I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Courses consisting of literature, grammar, and written composition for students who have completed either French 12, FREN 1217 with at least a "B" grade or FREN 1218. These courses are to be taken by all students' intending to proceed to second year French programs at university and by those wishing to further their knowledge of the French language.

Prerequisite(s): French 12, with "B" or higher or FREN 1217 with "B" or higher, or FREN 1218 with "B" or higher. Students with a "C" grade in French 12 or FREN 1217 should enrol in FREN 1118. FREN 1119/1219 students who need to reinforce their grammar can enrol concurrently in FREN 1118/1218.

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FREN 1219 French Language and Literature II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Courses consisting of literature, grammar, and written composition for students who have completed either French 12, FREN 1217 with at least a "B" grade or FREN 1218. These courses are to be taken by all students' intending to proceed to second year French programs at university and by those wishing to further their knowledge of the French language.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 1119 or permission of department.

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FREN 1225
 
GEOG 1120 Regional Geography of Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Regional Geography of Canada explores the similarities and differences among the regions of our country. Students will gain an understanding of the landscape, the environment and the economy as we survey Canada from Long Beach to Labrador and from Baffin Island to Burlington. Students will examine a range of social issues that provide insight into the nature of Canada.

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GEOG 1130 Urban Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the evolution of the city from the Greco-Roman period to the present. The course topics include the internal structure of the city; industrial, commercial and residential land use; transportation and the planning of the urban environment. An application of the concepts to Vancouver and the surrounding area forms the basis of practical and interactive planning focus groups.

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GEOG 1150 Geography of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

British Columbia is a richly endowed and diverse province. In this course the province's human and physical geography is explored. Topics covered include regions, climate, natural hazards, geomorphology, biogeography, history, resource development, Aboriginal issues, cultural diversity, and urbanization. Students will actively engage in discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and solutions. This course is of interest to students who would like to have a better understanding of British Columbia and its role within Canada and the world.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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HIST 1161 Selected Issues in Canadian History
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Selected Issues in Canadian History.

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HIST 2207 Early British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on the British Columbia historical experience from the time of contact between First Nations and European people until B.C. joined Confederation in 1871. Themes of particular interest include First Nations-European relations, colonial settlement, the structure of B.C.'s society and economy, American influences and Confederation. In addition, this course provides an introduction to research methods in local history.

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HIST 2217 Modern British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A topical survey of British Columbia history since Confederation in 1871 with special attention to the structure of B.C.'s economy, the ethnic make-up of the province, First Nations' issues, industrial relations, urbanization, environmental questions and provincial politics. In addition, this course provides an introduction to historical research methods.

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HIST 2269 Canadian-American Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of integration and conflict, from our historical beginnings to our twentieth century industrialization. The course will examine the influence the United States has had on the development of Canadian Society in the areas of economics, culture, defence and foreign policy.

Prerequisite(s): Any History course.

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PHIL 2226 Social and Political Philosophy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates the meaning of such concepts as freedom, justice, equality, power, authority and alienation, which lie at the roots of major contemporary ideologies such as liberalism, fascism, communism, socialism and anarchism.

Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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POLI 1119 Canadian Politics and Government
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course deals with the origins and structure of Canadian government and analyses the social and political forces which shape our current political system. Topics include Parliament, the PM and Cabinet, political parties, Quebec nationalism, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

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POLI 2209 Canadian Public Policy
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of how laws are developed and implemented in Canada. Topics will include general policy-making theory as well as the roles of the public, parliament, cabinet, and public service in policy development.

Prerequisite(s): POLI 1100 or 1119 or 2250 (formerly 1150).

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POLI 2219 Canadian Public Administration
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the administration of government in Canada, including current social and political patterns in modern large-scale organizations, the organization of the Government of Canada and power of the bureaucracy. This course should be of particular interest to students planning to take Commerce.

Prerequisite(s): POLI 1100 or 1119 or 2250 (formerly 1150).

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SOCI 1121 Introduction to Sociology: Structures and Processes
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

What is the role of the individual in society and how does society influence the lives of individuals? Students explore a wide range of concepts, theories, and issues that shape reciprocal relationships between society and the individual. Subjects may include gender stratification, race and ethnicity, aging and the elderly, the economy, politics and government, the family, education, health and medicine, population, urbanization, the environment, and social movements.

Note: SOCI 1120 and 1121 may be taken in any order, or concurrently, as they are complementary first-year courses.

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WMST 1116 Investigating Women's Realities: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to critical thinking about the lives of women. Through the lens of comparative theories and diverse perspectives, this course examines links and connections between personal and collective experiences - in the home, in the body, and on the street. Using an interdisciplinary and participatory approach, students will make sense of historical patterns and movements for social change.

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WMST 1216 Exploring Women's Lives: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to naming and analyzing women's life experiences. Students will explore topics relevant to women's everyday lives such as body image, work and family, to develop a critical awareness of what limits and expands experiences, locally and globally, yesterday and today. This course considers how gender is constructed across age, class, race/ethnicity and sexuality. It pulls from a variety of disciplines and uses a popular education approach to shed light on issues and strategies for change.

WMST 1116 and 1216 can be taken in any order.

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or any additional CNST courses.
Maximum of two courses in any one subject area.
 
Attendance at a three-part series of lectures on Canadian topics CNST 1105 (0 credit - no tuition fee) or satisfactory completion of one Special Project specifically related to Canadian Studies, to be determined and supervised by the Interdisciplinary Studies Department.
 

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Diploma in Arts and Science, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
Two of
CNST 1110 American Power in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Provides an understanding of contemporary American cultural, economic and political power in Canada and the varied popular and institutional responses. Topics may include the political-economy of Canada - US relations; the free trade agreements and globalization; and American impact on Canadian arts, film and media.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

More Information »

CNST 1120 Canadian First Nations' Concerns
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of contemporary First Nations' (Indian, Inuit and Metis) issues. Emphasis placed upon various social, political, economic, anthropological and artistic concerns in terms of the Canadian multicultural perspective.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

More Information »

CNST 1130 Work in Canadian Society
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An interdisciplinary study of the concept of work in Canadian society. The problems Canadians encounter in the field of work will be considered from such viewpoints as sociology, history, literature, and philosophy.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

More Information »

CNST 1140 Racism and Ethnic Relations in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course deals with racial and ethnic relations in Canada. It will emphasize social, political and economic analyses of the family, school, workplace, law and media, with special focus on British Columbia.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

More Information »

CNST 1150 Quebec Nationalism
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Provides an opportunity to understand the origins, development and contemporary nature of Quebec nationalism. The course will examine the social, cultural, political, economic and linguistic manifestations of Quebec nationalism and assess the tensions between Quebec and the rest of Canada. The possibility of meeting Quebecois aspirations within Canada and related special status arrangements will be discussed.

This course satisfies the Canadian content requirement for the Bachelor of Education Degree at UBC.

More Information »

All of
ENGL 2225 Canadian Literature
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides a survey of Canadian literature, focusing on a selection of representative works from two or more genres (e.g. poetry, novels, drama, non-fiction prose, etc.). In addition, the course will note some of the characteristic patterns and trends in Canadian literature.

Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128; and one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.


More Information »

HIST 1116 Colonies and Conflict: Canada to 1867
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The analysis of early French and English colonies on the eastern coast through the period of colonial rivalry; the relationship between Europeans and First Nations; the British conquest; the conflict of cultures; social, economic, and political developments to 1867. HIST 1116 can be taken before or after HIST 1126 (Modern Canada) or concurrently.

More Information »

HIST 1126 Forging a Nation: Canada since 1867
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The social, political, and economic growth of Canada since Confederation. This course will consider such topics as 19th century economic policy, the relationship between First Nations and the emerging Canadian state, the place of Quebec in Canada, women's historical experience, the impact of industrialization, and Canada's relationship to both Britain and the United States. History 1126 can be taken before or after History 1116 (Early Canada) or concurrently.

More Information »

One of
ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.

Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123 or 1127 or 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

More Information »

ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, and 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in one of English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or English First Peoples 12, or equivalent; ENGL 1120 with a minimum "C" grade; or one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110 with an "S" grade.

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ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127, or 1128.

Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of the following: a minimum 50% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110. Previously completed LET with a minimum score of 3 can also be used as a prerequisite.

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Five of
ANTH 1150 Regional Studies in Anthropology: Pacific Northwest
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to historic indigenous cultures of the Pacific Northwest Coast from northern California to Alaska. This is a survey course that considers the nature of the diversity of the people and cultures of the area from an ethnohistoric perspective. Topics may include subsistence and settlement patterns, language, world view, myth and art forms.

More Information »

ANTH 1180 Aboriginal Cultures of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to the origins and development of Interior and Coastal peoples. This survey course will consider the earliest cultural evidence, the development of regional diversity and the indigenous cultures at the time of contact.

More Information »

ECON 1221 Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Introductory macroeconomic concepts; circular flow of income and product; national income; equilibrium level of domestic income; fiscal policy; money and banking; international trade; inflation and unemployment.

More Information »

FREN 1115 Beginner's French I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing French; classroom work supplemented by practice in the Language Laboratory. Introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of French.

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FREN 1215 Beginner's French II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing French; classroom work supplemented by practice in the Language Laboratory. Introductory course for students with no previous knowledge of French.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 1115

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FREN 1205 French Conversational Skills
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

A conversational approach to French to enable students to communicate in everyday authentic situations. Students in FREN 1205 may register concurrently in FREN 1215, 1117 or 1217.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in one of the following: BC French 9 or 10, FREN 1115, 1215, or 1117; or permission of the department. Students with BC French 9 or 10 must contact the department for a prerequisite override. Overqualified students will not be given credit for this course.

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FREN 1117 Intermediate French I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

First-year College French for those who have completed FREN 1215 or Grade 11 French in secondary school, or equivalent. Intermediate grammar, short literary selections and contemporary passages for reading and oral practice are studied. These lessons are supplemented by oral work in the Language Laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): French 11 with a minimum "C" or FREN 1215 with a minimum "C-".

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FREN 1217 Intermediate French II
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

First-year College French for those who have completed FREN 1215 or Grade 11 French in secondary school, or equivalent with at least a "C-". Intermediate grammar, short literary selections and contemporary passages for reading and oral practice are studied. These lessons are supplemented by oral work in the Language Laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 1117. Students who obtained a "C-" in FREN 1117 more than a year ago are encouraged to take FREN 1215 concurrently.

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FREN 1118 French Language, Literature and Conversation I
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

Designed for students who want a less specialized course than FREN 1119/1219. This course offers a cultural overview, a review of grammar, a study of literary texts, and limited practice in conversation. Classroom work is supplemented by work in the Language Laboratory and by computer materials.

Prerequisite(s): French 12 with a minimum "C" grade or FREN 1217.

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FREN 1119 French Language and Literature I
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Courses consisting of literature, grammar, and written composition for students who have completed either French 12, FREN 1217 with at least a "B" grade or FREN 1218. These courses are to be taken by all students' intending to proceed to second year French programs at university and by those wishing to further their knowledge of the French language.

Prerequisite(s): French 12, with "B" or higher or FREN 1217 with "B" or higher, or FREN 1218 with "B" or higher. Students with a "C" grade in French 12 or FREN 1217 should enrol in FREN 1118. FREN 1119/1219 students who need to reinforce their grammar can enrol concurrently in FREN 1118/1218.

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FREN 1219 French Language and Literature II
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Courses consisting of literature, grammar, and written composition for students who have completed either French 12, FREN 1217 with at least a "B" grade or FREN 1218. These courses are to be taken by all students' intending to proceed to second year French programs at university and by those wishing to further their knowledge of the French language.

Prerequisite(s): FREN 1119 or permission of department.

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GEOG 1120 Regional Geography of Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The Regional Geography of Canada explores the similarities and differences among the regions of our country. Students will gain an understanding of the landscape, the environment and the economy as we survey Canada from Long Beach to Labrador and from Baffin Island to Burlington. Students will examine a range of social issues that provide insight into the nature of Canada.

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GEOG 1130 Urban Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A survey of the evolution of the city from the Greco-Roman period to the present. The course topics include the internal structure of the city; industrial, commercial and residential land use; transportation and the planning of the urban environment. An application of the concepts to Vancouver and the surrounding area forms the basis of practical and interactive planning focus groups.

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GEOG 1150 Geography of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

British Columbia is a richly endowed and diverse province. In this course the province's human and physical geography is explored. Topics covered include regions, climate, natural hazards, geomorphology, biogeography, history, resource development, Aboriginal issues, cultural diversity, and urbanization. Students will actively engage in discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and solutions. This course is of interest to students who would like to have a better understanding of British Columbia and its role within Canada and the world.

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GEOG 1155 Environmental Geography
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Environmental geography explores the relationships between people and the world they inhabit. Students will be introduced to the key concepts and theories of environmental studies: physical and biological processes, population, biogeography, resource management, and environmental ethics. Case studies of human impacts on the environment (both local and global) such as resource depletion, species extinction and loss of biodiversity, pollution of air, land and water, waste management, and natural hazard concerns are an integral part of the course.

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HIST 1161 Selected Issues in Canadian History
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Selected Issues in Canadian History.

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HIST 2207 Early British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on the British Columbia historical experience from the time of contact between First Nations and European people until B.C. joined Confederation in 1871. Themes of particular interest include First Nations-European relations, colonial settlement, the structure of B.C.'s society and economy, American influences and Confederation. In addition, this course provides an introduction to research methods in local history.

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HIST 2217 Modern British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

A topical survey of British Columbia history since Confederation in 1871 with special attention to the structure of B.C.'s economy, the ethnic make-up of the province, First Nations' issues, industrial relations, urbanization, environmental questions and provincial politics. In addition, this course provides an introduction to historical research methods.

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HIST 2269 Canadian-American Relations
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of integration and conflict, from our historical beginnings to our twentieth century industrialization. The course will examine the influence the United States has had on the development of Canadian Society in the areas of economics, culture, defence and foreign policy.

Prerequisite(s): Any History course.

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PHIL 2226 Social and Political Philosophy
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course investigates the meaning of such concepts as freedom, justice, equality, power, authority and alienation, which lie at the roots of major contemporary ideologies such as liberalism, fascism, communism, socialism and anarchism.

Prerequisite(s): Any first-year Philosophy course or consent of the instructor.

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POLI 1119 Canadian Politics and Government
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course deals with the origins and structure of Canadian government and analyses the social and political forces which shape our current political system. Topics include Parliament, the PM and Cabinet, political parties, Quebec nationalism, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

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POLI 2209 Canadian Public Policy
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of how laws are developed and implemented in Canada. Topics will include general policy-making theory as well as the roles of the public, parliament, cabinet, and public service in policy development.

Prerequisite(s): POLI 1100 or 1119 or 2250 (formerly 1150).

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POLI 2219 Canadian Public Administration
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the administration of government in Canada, including current social and political patterns in modern large-scale organizations, the organization of the Government of Canada and power of the bureaucracy. This course should be of particular interest to students planning to take Commerce.

Prerequisite(s): POLI 1100 or 1119 or 2250 (formerly 1150).

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POLI 2219 Canadian Public Administration
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A study of the administration of government in Canada, including current social and political patterns in modern large-scale organizations, the organization of the Government of Canada and power of the bureaucracy. This course should be of particular interest to students planning to take Commerce.

Prerequisite(s): POLI 1100 or 1119 or 2250 (formerly 1150).

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WMST 1116 Investigating Women's Realities: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to critical thinking about the lives of women. Through the lens of comparative theories and diverse perspectives, this course examines links and connections between personal and collective experiences - in the home, in the body, and on the street. Using an interdisciplinary and participatory approach, students will make sense of historical patterns and movements for social change.

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WMST 1116 Investigating Women's Realities: An Introduction
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to critical thinking about the lives of women. Through the lens of comparative theories and diverse perspectives, this course examines links and connections between personal and collective experiences - in the home, in the body, and on the street. Using an interdisciplinary and participatory approach, students will make sense of historical patterns and movements for social change.

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or any additional CNST courses.
Maximum of two courses in any one subject area.
 
Attendance at a three-part series of lectures on Canadian topics CNST 1105 (0 credit - no tuition fee) or satisfactory completion of one Special Project specifically related to Canadian Studies, to be determined and supervised by the Interdisciplinary Studies Department.