Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The Aboriginal studies program is an integrated university-transferable program that addresses historic and contemporary Aboriginal issues in Canada. The Aboriginal studies program is unique and comprehensive. The program welcomes all Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students.

The Aboriginal studies program has been designed to maximize options for graduates. In this respect, the program curriculum adopts a unique outcome approach, providing flexible options for students in terms of employment or further post-secondary education. The Aboriginal studies program also strives to overcome many of the systemic barriers that can hinder the success and completion rates for many Aboriginal students. Equal emphasis is placed on developing analytical, critical thinking, and interpersonal communications skills, as well as laying a solid foundation for additional educational pursuits.

The curriculum provides students with a thorough understanding of the historic and current circumstances of Aboriginal life in Canada and internationally, while at the same time looking to the future in terms of Aboriginal self-government and community development.

The three options of study in the Aboriginal studies program differ in the number of credits required for each option and in that the Associate of Arts Degree option requires math and science. The option chosen will depend on the needs and future goals of the student. The associate degree and diploma programs can be completed in four semesters. The certificate program can be completed in two semesters. All options can be completed on a part-time basis.

A unique and integral aspect of the Aboriginal studies program is the seminar component in which both students and faculty participate. The goals of these seminars are:

  • To expose the students to and stimulate discussion on different topics that may or may not be covered in the classroom.
  • To promote and foster a sense of community amongst the Aboriginal studies program students and faculty.
  • To provide for open discussion and feedback from the students to assist in program evaluation and to facilitate change.
  • To establish a supportive atmosphere between students and the program faculty to enhance completion/retention rates. Elders often participate in the seminars.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree, students must complete a minimum of 60 credits including:

Courses Credits
All of
ABST 1100 Canadian Aboriginal Experience
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course examines the experience of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada from pre-contact to present. This course focuses on the relationship between Aboriginal people and the migrants to Canada with an emphasis on British Columbia.

More Information »

ABST 1102 Aboriginal Culture, Identity, and Community
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an introduction to Indigenous worldviews, philosophies and identities. The cultural, historical, societal, spiritual and psychological dimensions of pre-contact societies will be explored thus providing a framework for understanding traditional strengths of Indigenous communities, families and individuals. Students will develop conceptual and personal frameworks to better understand the relationship of Indigenous identity to cultural, social, spiritual, and personal values.

More Information »

ABST 1104 Canadian Aboriginal Policy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to British and Canadian Indian Policy from contact to the present. This course examines the legislation and policy governing the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and British Columbia. Emphasis will be on a critical examination of the various Indian Acts.Students will receive credit for only one of ABST 1101, 1104, or 2209.

More Information »

ABST 1115 Aboriginal Contemporary Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the contemporary issues facing Aboriginal people. A variety of current issues will be examined along with their historical origins.

More Information »

ABST 1116 Aboriginal Women in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course explores Aboriginal women in Canada from both historic and contemporary perspectives. A holistic and interactive approach will be used.

More Information »

ABST 1150 Global Indigenous Perspectives
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys Aboriginal people from around the world: their different perspectives and different histories. Particular attention will be paid to the recognition of Aboriginal rights and the struggle for self-determination. Applicable international law and the international bodies will also be examined.

More Information »

ABST 1200 Criminal Justice and Aboriginal People
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys the history of the application of criminal law with respect to Aboriginal people. This course examines the impact of the Criminal Code and the Criminal Justice System on Aboriginal life in Canada while focusing on contemporary conditions and the potential for reform.

More Information »

ABST 2120 Canadian Aboriginal Law
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course examines relations between Aboriginal people and the Canadian government including treaties, modern treaty-making, political negotiations, legislation, and the recognition of Aboriginal rights under the Canadian constitution. The role of Aboriginal law and traditions will be included as well as contemporary changes, reforms, and the potential these have for Aboriginal self-government.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ABST 1104.

More Information »

One of
ABST 2100 Aboriginal Community - Applied Research
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The research must be an approved topic related to Aboriginal community issues and development. The research will be supervised by a tutor and must be in co-operation with at least one Aboriginal community. The research should be relevant to the needs of the community, or communities in question.Prerequisite(s): ABST 1100, 1102, 1104, 1115, and 1116.Corequisite(s): ABST 2101.

More Information »

ABST 2101 Aboriginal Community - Directed Readings
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will be an examination and analysis of the literature pertaining to the approved applied research topic (ABST 2100) under the supervision of a tutor.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in all of the following: ABST 1100, 1102, 1104, 1115, and 1116.Corequisite(s): ABST 2100.

More Information »

ABST 2230 Aboriginal Community Development
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on Aboriginal community development and the needs of Aboriginal communities now and in the future. Strategies for success will be examined as Aboriginal communities move toward self-reliance. Case studies will be used to explore course concepts.

More Information »

ABST 2240 Urban Aboriginal Strategies
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Since 1951 there has been a rapid growth in the number of First Nations Canadians living in the city. Despite this there has been little academic attention given to the systemic study of Canadian Aboriginal peoples living in urban centres. This course introduces students to the problems and prospects faced by Canadian First Nations people in urban environments. Topics include migration, housing, employment, and a critical examination of government policy regarding acculturation and assimilation.

More Information »

Three of
ABST 1105 Aboriginal Studies Seminar I
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

ABST 1106 Aboriginal Studies Seminar II
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

ABST 1107 Aboriginal Studies Seminar III
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

ABST 1108 Aboriginal Studies Seminar IV
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

(bi-weekly seminars)
 
Two of
first-year ENGL courses
6
Two of
humanities courses (other than ENGL)
6
One of
3
One of
science (ABST 1207 meets this requirement)
3
One of
lab science (ABST 1206 meets this requirement)
3
60 Credits

Concentration Notes:

Elective choices must be made in consultation with the program co-ordinator. Please request a complete list of acceptable electives from the co-ordinator.

CURRICULUM

Within the framework of the general requirements of the Diploma in Arts and Science, students must complete the following:

Courses Credits
All of
ABST 1100 Canadian Aboriginal Experience
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course examines the experience of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada from pre-contact to present. This course focuses on the relationship between Aboriginal people and the migrants to Canada with an emphasis on British Columbia.

More Information »

ABST 1102 Aboriginal Culture, Identity, and Community
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an introduction to Indigenous worldviews, philosophies and identities. The cultural, historical, societal, spiritual and psychological dimensions of pre-contact societies will be explored thus providing a framework for understanding traditional strengths of Indigenous communities, families and individuals. Students will develop conceptual and personal frameworks to better understand the relationship of Indigenous identity to cultural, social, spiritual, and personal values.

More Information »

ABST 1104 Canadian Aboriginal Policy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to British and Canadian Indian Policy from contact to the present. This course examines the legislation and policy governing the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and British Columbia. Emphasis will be on a critical examination of the various Indian Acts.Students will receive credit for only one of ABST 1101, 1104, or 2209.

More Information »

ABST 1115 Aboriginal Contemporary Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the contemporary issues facing Aboriginal people. A variety of current issues will be examined along with their historical origins.

More Information »

ABST 1116 Aboriginal Women in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course explores Aboriginal women in Canada from both historic and contemporary perspectives. A holistic and interactive approach will be used.

More Information »

ABST 1150 Global Indigenous Perspectives
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys Aboriginal people from around the world: their different perspectives and different histories. Particular attention will be paid to the recognition of Aboriginal rights and the struggle for self-determination. Applicable international law and the international bodies will also be examined.

More Information »

ABST 1200 Criminal Justice and Aboriginal People
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys the history of the application of criminal law with respect to Aboriginal people. This course examines the impact of the Criminal Code and the Criminal Justice System on Aboriginal life in Canada while focusing on contemporary conditions and the potential for reform.

More Information »

ABST 2120 Canadian Aboriginal Law
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course examines relations between Aboriginal people and the Canadian government including treaties, modern treaty-making, political negotiations, legislation, and the recognition of Aboriginal rights under the Canadian constitution. The role of Aboriginal law and traditions will be included as well as contemporary changes, reforms, and the potential these have for Aboriginal self-government.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ABST 1104.

More Information »

One of
ABST 2100 Aboriginal Community - Applied Research
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The research must be an approved topic related to Aboriginal community issues and development. The research will be supervised by a tutor and must be in co-operation with at least one Aboriginal community. The research should be relevant to the needs of the community, or communities in question.Prerequisite(s): ABST 1100, 1102, 1104, 1115, and 1116.Corequisite(s): ABST 2101.

More Information »

ABST 2101 Aboriginal Community - Directed Readings
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will be an examination and analysis of the literature pertaining to the approved applied research topic (ABST 2100) under the supervision of a tutor.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in all of the following: ABST 1100, 1102, 1104, 1115, and 1116.Corequisite(s): ABST 2100.

More Information »

ABST 2230 Aboriginal Community Development
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on Aboriginal community development and the needs of Aboriginal communities now and in the future. Strategies for success will be examined as Aboriginal communities move toward self-reliance. Case studies will be used to explore course concepts.

More Information »

ABST 2240 Urban Aboriginal Strategies
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Since 1951 there has been a rapid growth in the number of First Nations Canadians living in the city. Despite this there has been little academic attention given to the systemic study of Canadian Aboriginal peoples living in urban centres. This course introduces students to the problems and prospects faced by Canadian First Nations people in urban environments. Topics include migration, housing, employment, and a critical examination of government policy regarding acculturation and assimilation.

More Information »

Three of
ABST 1105 Aboriginal Studies Seminar I
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

ABST 1106 Aboriginal Studies Seminar II
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

ABST 1107 Aboriginal Studies Seminar III
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

ABST 1108 Aboriginal Studies Seminar IV
0

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This bi-weekly seminar will provide a supportive atmosphere for all program students and faculty. The discourse will include all related program issues and will regularly include Elders and guest speakers.

More Information »

(bi-weekly seminars)
 
One of
ENGL 1100 Reading and Writing about Literature
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1100 is a writing-intensive introduction to the disciplines of literary studies. Students will examine three or four literary texts in their critical and scholarly contexts in regard to a single interdisciplinary topic and from the perspectives of at least three sub-disciplines of literary studies, such as narratology, historiography, psychoanalytic criticism, eco-criticism etc.Note: Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100. Students entering other faculties at UBC or planning to transfer to other institutions should take ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128 instead of ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; or a minimum "C" grade in three credits of university-transferable English.

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ENGL 1123 Introduction to Academic Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students read and analyze a variety of texts in order to develop techniques of research, critical thinking, close reading, and clear writing in an academic context. Course readings, which include a selection of scholarly articles, are drawn from at least three academic disciplines. By exploring and responding to a range of topics, students develop a foundation for post-secondary writing.Students will only receive credit for one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; or a minimum "C" grade in three credits of university-transferrable English.

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ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1126, 1127, or 1128.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; or an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required. Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1123, 1127, or 1128.Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12 or Literary Studies 12, or equivalent.

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One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; or a minimum "C" grade in three credits of university-transferable English.

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ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET 4 (or LET 3 with a strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121); a minimum 70% in English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, Literary Studies 12, or equivalent; a minimum "C" grade in ENGL 1120; an "S" grade in ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110; or a minimum "C" grade in three credits of university-transferable English.

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Program Option Notes:

Elective choices must be made in consultation with the program co-ordinator. Please request a complete list of acceptable electives from the co-ordinator.

Students seeking admission to the Certificate in Aboriginal Studies Post-Degree must have a university degree in an appropriate discipline. The certificate is composed of 30 credits from the program’s core courses. The intent of the certificate is to provide an educational option for university graduates whose work requires knowledge of Aboriginal issues.

CURRICULUM

For a Certificate in Aboriginal Studies Post-Degree, students must complete 30 credits from the following:

Total Credits: 30

Courses Credits
Ten of
ABST 1100 Canadian Aboriginal Experience
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course examines the experience of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada from pre-contact to present. This course focuses on the relationship between Aboriginal people and the migrants to Canada with an emphasis on British Columbia.

More Information »

ABST 1102 Aboriginal Culture, Identity, and Community
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course provides students with an introduction to Indigenous worldviews, philosophies and identities. The cultural, historical, societal, spiritual and psychological dimensions of pre-contact societies will be explored thus providing a framework for understanding traditional strengths of Indigenous communities, families and individuals. Students will develop conceptual and personal frameworks to better understand the relationship of Indigenous identity to cultural, social, spiritual, and personal values.

More Information »

ABST 1104 Canadian Aboriginal Policy
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An introduction to British and Canadian Indian Policy from contact to the present. This course examines the legislation and policy governing the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and British Columbia. Emphasis will be on a critical examination of the various Indian Acts.Students will receive credit for only one of ABST 1101, 1104, or 2209.

More Information »

ABST 1115 Aboriginal Contemporary Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course examines the contemporary issues facing Aboriginal people. A variety of current issues will be examined along with their historical origins.

More Information »

ABST 1116 Aboriginal Women in Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course explores Aboriginal women in Canada from both historic and contemporary perspectives. A holistic and interactive approach will be used.

More Information »

ABST 1150 Global Indigenous Perspectives
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys Aboriginal people from around the world: their different perspectives and different histories. Particular attention will be paid to the recognition of Aboriginal rights and the struggle for self-determination. Applicable international law and the international bodies will also be examined.

More Information »

ABST 1200 Criminal Justice and Aboriginal People
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course surveys the history of the application of criminal law with respect to Aboriginal people. This course examines the impact of the Criminal Code and the Criminal Justice System on Aboriginal life in Canada while focusing on contemporary conditions and the potential for reform.

More Information »

ABST 2100 Aboriginal Community - Applied Research
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

The research must be an approved topic related to Aboriginal community issues and development. The research will be supervised by a tutor and must be in co-operation with at least one Aboriginal community. The research should be relevant to the needs of the community, or communities in question.Prerequisite(s): ABST 1100, 1102, 1104, 1115, and 1116.Corequisite(s): ABST 2101.

More Information »

ABST 2101 Aboriginal Community - Directed Readings
3

Lecture Hours: 4.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course will be an examination and analysis of the literature pertaining to the approved applied research topic (ABST 2100) under the supervision of a tutor.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in all of the following: ABST 1100, 1102, 1104, 1115, and 1116.Corequisite(s): ABST 2100.

More Information »

ABST 2120 Canadian Aboriginal Law
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

This course examines relations between Aboriginal people and the Canadian government including treaties, modern treaty-making, political negotiations, legislation, and the recognition of Aboriginal rights under the Canadian constitution. The role of Aboriginal law and traditions will be included as well as contemporary changes, reforms, and the potential these have for Aboriginal self-government.Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ABST 1104.

More Information »

ABST 2230 Aboriginal Community Development
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course focuses on Aboriginal community development and the needs of Aboriginal communities now and in the future. Strategies for success will be examined as Aboriginal communities move toward self-reliance. Case studies will be used to explore course concepts.

More Information »

ABST 2240 Urban Aboriginal Strategies
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Since 1951 there has been a rapid growth in the number of First Nations Canadians living in the city. Despite this there has been little academic attention given to the systemic study of Canadian Aboriginal peoples living in urban centres. This course introduces students to the problems and prospects faced by Canadian First Nations people in urban environments. Topics include migration, housing, employment, and a critical examination of government policy regarding acculturation and assimilation.

More Information »

30 Credits

Program Option Notes:

Course planning must be approved by the program co-ordinator.