New Courses (Effective 201820):

Back to top

New Courses (Effective 201830):

Back to top

FINA 2173, 3 credits

Advanced Printmaking: Relief/Collograph, 3 credits

New course as of Summer 2018

This course broadens students' understanding of the fundamentals of relief printmaking. Students will develop and translate their ideas through the creation of linocut, collograph, and experimental relief prints, and become more confident in their ability to produce small editions. Incorporating presentations on the history of relief printmaking and contemporary applications and examples, the primary focus of the course is the hands-on exploration of these various techniques.

Prerequisite(s): All 1st Year Studios:1120,1220,1142,1143,1111,1161,1171,1131 

Back to top


FINA 2190, 3 credits

Performance in the Visual Arts

New course as of Summer 2018

In the field of contemporary art, artists increasingly require an expanded understanding of interdisciplinary practice and time-based art. Throughout this course, students engage in a series of studio projects that explore live performance, performance for the camera, and collaborative processes. Through in-class exercises, assignments, presentations, and lectures, students are introduced to the historical relationship between performance and the visual arts while developing projects that examine the dematerialization of the art object, the relationship between performer and audience, and the hyper-performativity of the contemporary subject. If students have taken a previous FINA 2195 Special Topics class with similar content, they will not get credit for this course. 

Prerequisite(s): FINA 1111, FINA 1120, FINA 1131, FINA 1142, FINA 1143, FINA 1161, FINA 1171, FINA 1220

Back to top


FINA 2290, 3 credits

Performance and Time Based Practice

New course as of Summer 2018

This course is designed to offer students an understanding of performance and time-based processes within the field of visual art. Throughout this course, students will be introduced to the cultural discourse that surrounds performance, while gaining exposure to contemporary practices that employ durational processes. In-class studio exercises, assignments, presentations, readings, and lectures will facilitate a critical investigation into performance. Visits to exhibitions/performances and presentations by guest speakers will aim to further expand students' relationship to contemporary local practice and the surrounding art community. Throughout the course students will exercise their skills in critical thinking, conceptual process, and creative experimentation to realize a series of projects that explore the body, site, and duration in performance. If students have taken a previous FINA 2195 Special Topics class with similar content, they will not get credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s): FINA 1111, FINA 1120, FINA 1131, FINA 1142, FINA 1143, FINA 1161, FINA 1171, FINA 1220

Back to top


FMGT 4510, 3 credits

Ethics in Accounting

New course as of Summer 2018

Introduction to the Advanced Certificate in Accounting and Finance Method, which is the problem-solving approach used throughout the applied courses. This framework underscores the importance of business and accounting ethics. Other workplace skills are integrated into the course, with special attention given to communication while applying the framework to various scenarios typically encountered by those working in mid-level accounting and related positions.

Back to top


FMGT 4530, 3 credits

Applied External Audit

New course as of Summer 2018

This course focuses on applying the concepts of audit and assurance to the preparation of a simulated audit working paper files of a company, using relevant software. Topics include preparing appropriate documentation, applying relevant sampling methods, executing audit procedures in various audit cycles using industry standard software, and analyzing audit evidence for potential issues through reviews, compilations, and special reports.

Prerequisite(s): FMGT 3263 or FMGT 4880, FMGT 4510 (can also be taken concurrently)

 

Back to top


FMGT 4540, 3 credits

Applied Personal and Corporate Taxation

New course as of Summer 2018

This course emphasizes the application of personal and corporate tax concepts in the preparation of tax returns for individual and corporate clients. The purpose of this course is to produce a mid-level accountant with tax skills who is able to function in environments of low to mid-level complexity with low levels of uncertainty. Applied knowledge is the focus, using authentic scenarios to demonstrate application of technical skills. Excel and tax software are integrated in the course material and in assessments to help develop the practical skills needed in the marketplace.

Prerequisite(s): FMGT 4225 or FMGT 4875, FMGT 4510 (can also be taken concurrently)

Back to top




HIST 1120, 3 credits

War and Society

New course as of Summer 2018

Warfare has evolved from ancient to modern times. In this course, students explore the transformative effect of warfare on society while also examining how social, cultural, and political changes have dramatically altered the way warfare is conducted. Students assess collective identities, state formation, and economic systems in shaping war-making capabilities of nations, empires, and sub-state actors and examine the relationship between war, social change, and culture. The morality of war and its role as an instrument of change in transforming societies will also be discussed.

Back to top


FMGT 4520, 3 credits

Business Applications

New course as of Fall 2018

Students will apply the Advanced Certificate in Accounting and Finance (ACAF) method to a single comprehensive business scenario drawing upon all aspects learned in previous coursework. Each week, the scenario will require students to demonstrate a different combination of technical skills acquired through the technical application courses.

Prerequisite(s): FMGT 3121, FMGT 3223, BCAP 3200, FMGT 3263, FMGT 4225, FMGT 4510

Back to top


FMGT 4550, 3 credits

Public Sector Financial Management

New course as of Fall 2018

Students acquire the public sector financial management skills necessary to function in public sector environments of low to medium complexity with low uncertainty. Accounting functions in a government setting are the focus, including governance and decision-making processes, budgeting and planning, and financial reporting. Students analyze the finances of government and not-for-profit programs as well as gain an understanding of public sector auditing.

Prerequisite(s): FMGT 3121, FMGT 4510 (can also be taken concurrently)

Back to top


FMGT 4560, 3 credits

Not-for-Profit Accounting and Related Topics

New course as of Fall 2018

Students examine accounting concepts encountered in the not-for-profit and charities sector. Topic include the creation and the good governance of not-for-profit organizations (NFPOs) as well as the differences in accounting from for-profit entities including fund accounting, the use of the restricted fund method, and the deferral method of accounting for contributions. Students learn the characteristics of registered charities, types of government organizations, and the use of accounting software for NFPOs.

Prerequisite(s): FMGT 3121, FMGT 4510 (can also be taken concurrently)

Back to top


GERO 1100, 3 credits

Gerontology I: Introduction to Gerontology

New course as of Fall 2018

Students examine ways of thinking about aging from diverse fields of inquiry including historical, political, social, and global perspectives. They learn the major theories of aging as they relate to the developing field of gerontology. Topics include human rights and religious and cultural perspectives on aging including the Canadian Indigenous experience. Students learn about the impact of population aging on society as well as current responses to the needs, challenges, and concerns of Canada’s aging population. Students examine aging from a systems perspective with an emphasis on positive outcomes and understandings about aging.

Back to top


GERO 1115, 3 credits

Helping Relationships with Older Adults I: Practical Skills

New course as of Fall 2018

Students explore the central role of the therapeutic relationship for helping older persons. They reflect on their motivation for becoming helpers in the field of gerontology, analyze their own natural style of helping, and learn how to use a recognized helping skills framework. Students learn the value of self-care, the client-centred approach, and practice primary helping skills including basic listening, empathy, and influencing. They have multiple opportunities to practice using the skills to effectively conduct interviews with older persons and their families.

This is a highly participatory course. Students will learn through a variety of learning activities such as lectures, case studies, group discussions, audio visual presentations, readings, audio taping, videotaping, exams, and written assignments. All students will be expected to participate in role-playing in class in order to perfect their use of the skills taught in this course.

Back to top


GERO 1200, 3 credits

Gerontology II: Understanding Aging Today

New course as of Fall 2018

Students analyze the political and social determinants of health of older persons and how race, class, and gender shape the experience of Canada's aging population. Students learn how aging influences our lives, our relationships, and our opportunities throughout the life course. They explore the trends and impacts of public policy on social services and health care services. Students reflect on aging in their own families and communities and examine their own ethics, beliefs, and attitudes about the life cycle, aging, and death and dying.

Prerequisite(s): GERO 1100

Back to top


GERO 1215, 3 credits

Helping Relationships with Older Adults II: Practical Skills

New course as of Fall 2018

Students learn to apply more advanced helping skills, including basic counselling skills, group facilitation, conflict resolution, problem-solving, and advocacy for older persons. They explore the role of family systems and ethical conduct. Students practice ways to enable clients to reframe their personal narratives, allowing them to think differently about concerns, issues, and challenges. Students learn how to set goals with clients that will help clients take action to address challenges.

This is a highly participatory course. Students will learn through a variety of learning activities such as lectures, case studies, group discussions, audio visual presentations, readings, audio taping, videotaping, exams, and written assignments. All students will be expected to participate in role-playing in class in order to perfect their use of the skills taught in the course.

Prerequisite(s): GERO 1115

Back to top


GERO 1300, 3 credits

Social Policy and Aging

New course as of Fall 2018

In this course, students learn about the role of the welfare state, how social determinants impact health, and key social policy issues related to population aging. Examples of Canadian social policy issues are incorporated throughout the course to give students numerous opportunities to analyze current issues and propose solutions. Students explore a variety of topics impacting older persons and their families today, including elder abuse, retirement income and income inequality, housing, health care, caregiving, aging in place, and death and dying.

Back to top


HSCI 1195, 3 credits

Human Biology of Aging

New course as of Fall 2018

In this course, students explore the physiological process of aging in humans. They learn fundamentals of human physiology and develop an understanding of current scientific theories on the process of normal human aging. Broader ideas of aging as a process in the wider biological world are also considered. In the second part of the course, students are introduced to expected manifestations of aging on key human systems such as the cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, reproductive, muscular and skeletal, and immune systems.


Prerequisite(s): One of the following: LET with a minimum level 3; IELTS 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each band; LPI with a minimum 26 on the essay and one of 5 in English usage, 5 in sentence structure, or 10 in reading comprehension; BC English 12 or equivalent with a minimum 80%; BC English Literature 12 with a minimum 80%; BC English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 80%; a university-level English or Communications course for which Langara awards transfer credit, with a minimum 'C-'; or 'C' in ENGL 1120; or an 'S' in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

Back to top