New Courses Effective Spring Semester 2020 (202010):

New Courses Effective Summer Semester 2020 (202020):

New Courses Effective Fall Semester 2020 (202030)

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AHIS 1120, 3 credits

Introduction to Museum and Curatorial Studies

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Galleries and museums are complex social and cultural institutions that collect, display, and interpret objects for-and with-diverse audiences. In this course, students explore the history, theory, and practice of curating in art, history, anthropology, and interdisciplinary galleries and museums. Students focus on the history of museum practices and the influences of multiple perspectives in facilitating learning experiences within museums and communities. Students also engage in hands-on curatorial projects. Classes are complemented by field trips to museums, galleries, and heritage sites.  

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BINF 1100, 0 credits

Bioinformatics Industry Topics I

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

This seminar course on industry topics provides students with opportunities to explore current and emerging research, trends, practices, and issues in bioinformatics. Course content changes from semester to semester and is selected based on current "hot topics" in the field. Please contact the Bioinformatics Program Coordinator for information about the next offering of this course.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

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BINF 2100, 0 credits

Bioinformatics Industry Topics II

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

This seminar course on industry topics provides students with opportunities to explore current and emerging research, trends, practices, and issues in bioinformatics. Course content changes from semester to semester and is selected based on current "hot topics" in the field. Please contact the Bioinformatics Program Coordinator for information about the next offering of this course.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

Prerequisite(s): An "S" grade in BINF 1100.

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BINF 3100, 0 credits

Bioinformatics Industry Topics III

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

This seminar course on industry topics provides students with opportunities to explore current and emerging research, trends, practices, and issues in bioinformatics. Course content changes from semester to semester and is selected based on current "hot topics" in the field. Please contact the Bioinformatics Program Coordinator for information about the next offering of this course.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

Prerequisite(s): An "S" grade in BINF 2100.

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BINF 4100, 0 credits

Bioinformatics Industry Topics IV

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

This seminar course on industry topics provides students with opportunities to explore current and emerging research, trends, practices, and issues in bioinformatics. Course content changes from semester to semester and is selected based on current "hot topics" in the field. Please contact the Bioinformatics Program Coordinator for information about the next offering of this course.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

Prerequisite(s): An "S" grade in BINF 3100.

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BINF 4215, 3 credits

Bioinformatics Capstone I

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

This research-based course will see students integrating and applying the knowledge and skills they have developed through lower level multidisciplinary courses in the bioinformatics program, as well as their co-op work term. Each student will investigate a novel bioinformatics question or problem by developing a detailed project proposal, conducting research, and writing and presenting their senior capstone project, providing a concrete contribution to the field of bioinformatics.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of the third-year of the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics and an "S" grade in COOP 2501.

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BINF 4225, 3 credits

Bioinformatics Capstone II

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

This research-based course will see students integrating and applying the knowledge and skills they have developed through lower level multidisciplinary courses in the bioinformatics program, as well as their co-op work term. Each student will investigate a novel bioinformatics question or problem by developing a detailed project proposal, conducting research, and writing and presenting their senior capstone project, providing a concrete contribution to the field of bioinformatics.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

Prerequisite(s): An "S" grade in BINF 4215.

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BINF 4290, 4 credits

Bioinformatics

New Course as of Fall Semester 2020

Students learn how to select, design, implement, and evaluate a variety of computational tools and techniques to solve problems in the field of biology such as sequencing DNA, identifying and predicting genes, and detecting RNA structures. They are introduced to the principles and practical approaches of bioinformatics including exhaustive search, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, divide and conquer, graph applications, clustering and trees, pattern matching, and hidden Markov models.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Bachelor of Science in Bioinformatics.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in BIOL 2315, BIOL 2330, and CPSC 4160..

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ECED 1102, 3 credits

Child Growth and Development I

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students are introduced to theories and research related to child growth and development. The origins of child growth and development research are explored. Students examine the overall progression of how children change and develop from birth to 3 years of age. This course focused on child development in the following areas: physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and language.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education.

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ECED 1112, 3 credits

Exploring the Environment I

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and implement play-based learning experiences throughout the early learning curriculum. Students begin to utilize a variety of observation techniques in order to interpret children’s interest and abilities and offer play-based learning experiences based on those observations and interpretations. Students need access to learning and care programs to successfully complete this course.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Diploma in Early Childhood Education.

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ECED 1202, 3 credits

Child Growth and Development II

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Building on material covered in ECED 1102: Child Growth and Development I, students explore current research and theories in child growth and development. Students examine the overall progression of how children change and develop from 36 months to five years of age. Students focus on child development in the following areas: physical, cognitive, social and emotional, and language within the context of a life-span developmental perspective.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ECED 1102.

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ECED 1212, 3 credits

Exploring the Environment II

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Building on material covered in ECED 1112: Exploring the Environment l, students further develop the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and implement play-based learning experiences throughout the curriculum. Students apply their knowledge, and refine their skill and ability to use a variety of observation techniques to interpret children’s interests and abilities. Students design and offer play-based learning experiences based on those observations and interpretations. Students will need access to early learning and care programs in order to successfully complete this course. 

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Diploma in Early Childhood Education.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ECED 1112.

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FMGT 2485, 3 credits

Investment Strategies

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students examine a broad range of investment management principles including investment research, planning, and analysis to improve decision-making and overall portfolio performance. Students analyze investment theory and process, financial markets and institutions, financial assets and their related valuations, and mutual funds.

Prerequisite(s):A minimum "C" grade in FMGT 1215 or 2293.

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HCAS 1100, 3 credits

Interpersonal Communication

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Interpersonal and intrapersonal skills are critical to the work of health care assistants. In this course, students focus on developing an awareness of self, as well as an awareness of others. Development of effective interpersonal communication skills that can be used in a variety of caregiving contexts will be emphasized. Students learn and practice effective communication techniques that demonstrate personal awareness, respect, and active listening skills. Students are encouraged to reflect on the impact of their own communication choices and patterns.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Corequisite(s): HCAS 1101, 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

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HCAS 1101, 1.5 credits

Lifestyle and Choices

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Health is a multifaceted concept including physical, social, emotional, and spiritual dimensions. Students explore health from a holistic perspective, as well as the components of a health-enhancing lifestyle.  Students reflect on their own experience of health, recognizing challenges and resources that can impact lifestyle choices.  A model that students may apply in other courses to understand the multi-faceted aspects of health and healing will be introduced. 

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Corequisites: HCAS 1100, 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

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HCAS 1110, 3 credits

Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges I

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

An understanding of the human body, aging, nutrition, and health challenges is critical to the delivery of day-to-day care. Students are introduced to the normal structure and function of the human body and normal bodily changes associated with aging. Students learn about common challenges to health and healing in relation to each body system. The focus is placed on exploring person-centred practice as it relates to the common challenges to health.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Corequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

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HCAS 1120, 3 credits

Concepts for Practice

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

A theoretical framework is essential for safe and competent practice as a health care assistant. Students in this course begin to develop a theoretical framework for practice. The philosophical values and theoretical understandings that provide a foundation for safe and competent practice are introduced with a focus on the concepts of caring and person-centred care, basic human needs and human development, family, culture, and diversity as these relate to health and healing. Students will also be introduced to a problem-solving model critical to their practice.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Corequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1130, and 1140.

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HCAS 1130, 1.5 credits

Introduction to Health Care Assistant Practice

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Students are introduced to the role of the health care assistant within the British Columbia health care system. They learn about the health care team and the roles and functions of health care assistants within the team. Further, students have opportunities to develop the self-reflective skills required for competent practice. Students will also be introduced to effective job finding approaches.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Corequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1120, and 1140.

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HCAS 1140, 3 credits

Personal Care and Assistance I

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Students acquire personal care and assistance skills within the parameters of the health care assistant role. Students develop the caregiver skills necessary to maintain and promote the comfort, safety, and independence of individuals in community and facility contexts.  Students are required to integrate theory from other courses as they complete the class and supervised laboratory experiences.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Corequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1120, and 1130.

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HCAS 1210, 3 credits

Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges II

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Students continue to explore the normal structure and function of the human body and common challenges to health and healing in relation to body systems. Students learn about person-centred practice as it relates to common health challenges, and in particular, end-of-life care.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Prerequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

Corequisites: HCAS 1220, 1240, and 1260.

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HCAS 1220, 3 credits

Caring for Individuals Experiencing Cognitive or Mental Health Challenges

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Students integrate content from earlier courses to explore concepts and caregiving approaches that will allow them to work effectively with individuals experiencing cognitive or mental health challenges.  Emphasis is placed on supporting clients with dementia, recognizing responsive behaviours, and identifying person-centred intervention strategies.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Prerequisites:HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

Corequisites: HCAS 1210, 1240, and 1260.

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HCAS 1240, 3 credits

Interpersonal Communication

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Students build on the personal care and assistance skills learned and developed in previous courses. Students integrate theory from other courses into the class and supervised laboratory experieces to develop caregiver skills that maintain and promote the comfort, safety, and independence of individuals in community and facility contexts.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Prerequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

Corequisites: HCAS 1210, 1220, and 1240.

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HCAS 1260, 6 credits

Practice Experience

New Course as of Summer Semester 2020

Students apply knowledge and skills from all other program courses in this supervised practice experience.  Students work with individuals in a multi-level or complex care setting. A portion of this clinical experience will be devoted to working with individuals with dementia. Students have the opportunity to gain expertise and confidence with the role of the health care assistant within a residential care facility.

Note: This course will be offered concurrently with theory classes in the second term. Students must not register for other classes on practice days. 

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Health Care Assistant.

Prerequisites: HCAS 1100, 1101, 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

Corequisites: HCAS 1210, 1220, and 1240.

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LAMS 2205, 3 credits

Latin American Writers Resist

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Latin American literature is a powerful force for social change. In this course, students compare, contrast, and analyze a variety of literature in translation from a wide range of Latin American countries, reflecting on the impact of context (the country, time period, social, cultural, political, and economic situations) on these texts. They explore how writers use literature to confront injustice related to gender, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, environment, land ownership, indigenous struggles, migration, and asylum, and apply this to a range of global issues outside Latin America.

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PSYC 2325, 3 credits

Personality

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Through the study of classical personality theories and cutting-edge research, students learn how biological, psychological, and sociocultural forces create individual differences in the human personality. Along the way, via personality inventories and self-reflection exercises, students gain an in-depth understanding of their own personalities and awareness of the potential consequences their personalities have for various well-being, interpersonal and mental health outcomes. Students also learn about stability and change in personality across situations and the lifespan; strategies for adjustment, resilience, and self-improvement; and contentious research into sex, gender, and personality. 

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2327, 3 credits

The Psychology of Human Animal Relationships

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students in this course undertake a critical analysis of the psychological dynamic between human and non-human animals. They explore what psychological science has discovered about animal consciousness, cognition, language, intelligence, emotion, motivation, and morality. As students form a grounding in how these capacities evolved in non-human animals, they will examine where we, as human animals, position ourselves in their world, and where non-human animals might position themselves in ours. Students delve into the scientific literature on the impact of animals on human health, animal and human attachment, the use of animals in psychological science, animal assisted therapy, and animal abuse and its association with other forms of violent behaviour directed at humans.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum  "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2329, 3 credits

Forensic Psychology

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students will examine the ways in which the fields of psychology and law intersect. Topics may include psychology and law enforcement, the role of psychological experts in court, eyewitness testimony, victimology, psychological assessment, and treatment of various forensic populations (e.g., youth offenders, violent and sexual offenders, criminal psychopaths etc.). Through selected topic areas, students explore the contribution of psychological theory, concepts, and principles to understanding human behaviour that occurs in the legal context. Students focus on how psychological research and clinical expertise inform current practice pertaining to both criminal and civil legal issues.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: PSYC 1195: Special Topics I - Psychology and the Law (offered in fall 2019) or PSYC 2329.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2333, 3 credits

Applied Behavioural Neuroscience

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Applied behavioural neuroscience draws upon empirical evidence from philosophy, psychology, biology, chemistry, and physics to better understand the biological basis of behaviour. Students explore a number of topics to better appreciate human diversity. Topics may include how people process taste and smells, how hormones regulate behaviour, and how psychoactive drugs interact with the nervous system. Students also learn about neuroimaging and how it is used to study topics such as the biological bases of learning and mental health. Students participate in hands-on lab activities and learn about research design and statistics that are commonly implemented in neuroscience research.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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