New Courses Effective Spring Semester 2022 (202210)

New Courses Effective Summer Semester 2022 (202220)

New Courses Effective Fall Semester 2022 (202230)


AHIS 1315, 3 credits

South Asian Art

From its pre-modern roots in the Indus Valley Civilization to the contemporary works of Subodh Gupta, students in this course survey the development of South Asian visual and material culture. The remarkable artistic creations that emerge from the present-day nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka attest to the connections and continuities between these distinct modern states. By making connections, students learn of the importance of exchange and interaction between religions, cultures, and various groups, such as Buddhists, Hindus, Jains, Muslims, Sikhs, and Christians, on the one hand, and Indians, Persians, Europeans, Central Asians, and Southeast Asians, on the other. Students further connect South Asian art and material culture to the broader history of the subcontinent. In this class, learners tackle traditional art-historical concerns, such as visual/iconographic analysis, explore the role of the artist and systems of patronage, as well as stylistic development, significance of materials, and theories of aesthetics. Students also relate South Asian art to its broader social, political, economic, and other dynamic contexts.

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AHIS 1316, 3 credits

Art and Intersectionality

Intersectionality is a framework for understanding how aspects of a person’s identity intertwine in relation to structures of power and privilege. These include aspects of intersectionality such as gender, race, class, sexuality, religion, physical and cognitive ability and appearance, etc. In this course students study art and visual culture from the perspective of intersectionality, where images and objects become contested sites of power, privilege and oppression. Through case studies, students explore how representations of various intersectionalities in art have traditionally expressed and reinforced cultural stereotypes in particular historical moments. Students also look at ways in which art has functioned to critique these stereotypes and challenge the status quo.

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AHIS 1317, 3 credits

Cultural Heritage in Crisis

In recent times, objects of cultural heritage have become contested sites where power struggles play out around political, racial, religious, class, sexual, and gender issues etc. The destruction of cultural heritage has become a tool of war and cultural cleansing. It features in protests calling for social justice. It has also resulted from natural disasters and climate change. Theft of culturally significant objects has been used to profit from the oppressed, control marginalized peoples, and in some cases conduct genocide. This course makes explicit the ways in which cultural heritage can be a symbol and visual reinforcement of oppressive power and a tool of propaganda denouncing certain groups. Students explore how vandalism and destruction of objects or sites can contribute to cultural genocide. In this course, students look at cultural heritage in the context of how these power struggles operate by examining aspects of conflict, commemoration, social justice movements, cultural appropriation, vandalism, destruction, theft, and repatriation.

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DSGN 1155, 3 credits

Interiors and Architecture I: Fundamentals of 3D Space and Representation

Students learn the fundamental building blocks of 3D spaces, how they are composed, traditional methods of representation, and their relationship to the human body. They explore these topics primarily through learning and applying CAD software, an essential tool in the practice of spatial design in its various stages and methodologies.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

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DSGN 1156, 3 credits

Experiential Design I: Storytelling & Curation in 3D Environments

Students explore different types of storytelling and narration found in the built environment and how they relate to design. They learn different strategies for making stories meaningful and memorable for a more impactful audience experience. Using instances found in exhibits, retail, public spaces, institutions, and even virtual environments, students examine how stories are told, structured, and organized to become a critical factor in the visual expression of the final design and what is understood from it. 

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

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DSGN 1256, 3 credits

Experiential Design II: Designing Around Objects and Ideas

Students explore how design can communicate specific stories in the built environment using a variety of mediums and techniques. They learn how to leverage a combination of objects, imagery, materials, and colours plus other sensory devices to communicate an idea or ideas. Through discussion and precedent studies, students find examples of how designers frame a story using objects and ideas. They examine how designers convey context, meaning, clarity, and focus to objects and ideas and how they relate to specific narratives. Through this process, students develop their own small-scale narrative designs using what they have learned including how objects are conserved, mounted, and secured.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in DSGN 1154 (may be taken concurrently); and a minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1156.

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DSGN 1300, 3 credits

Design Thinking

Design Thinking is a methodology used to create effective and memorable products and experiences. It is a non-linear, iterative process in which solutions are generated by empathy and proven through measurable data. This problem-solving process can be applied to any discipline that seeks to enhance the lives of a group of people. In this course, students learn to understand users, define problems, and create solutions to prototype and test. Exploring human-centered design principles, such as listening, observation, empathy, and collaboration, students solve real-world problems from ideation to proven prototype.
This course is open to all Langara students wishing to explore trends in design, as well as those intending to pursue studies in visual arts or considering careers in design.
This course focuses on Design Theory. It is not a design studio and does not teach design skills.

Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

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DSGN 2054, 2 credits

Establishing a Career in Design

Through research, goal setting, and interactions with design professionals, students explore career possibilities and educational paths. They gain the skills required to engage in informational interviews with industry experts, design custom resumes and cover letters, and implement professional social media strategies to advance their careers.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1153, 1250, and 1265; and a minimum "C-" grade in DSGN 1154 and 1255.

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DSGN 2155, 3 credits

Page Layout Software

Students use Adobe InDesign to create grids, page layout, master pages, paragraph styles, and incorporate vector graphics and photography in a multipage document. They also learn how to prepare press-ready files for commercial printing, including colour separation, spot colour, and registration.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

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DSGN 2256, 6 credits

Experiential Design IV: Media and Technology in Experiential Design

Students explore dynamic approaches to experiential design and storytelling in built environments. With an emphasis on current and emerging technology, they assess existing physical designs, diagnose problems, and explore design solutions through research, empathy, prototype, testing, iteration, and final documentation. In addition to design strategies, students survey and analyze existing technologies and develop skills to research and vet the evolving array of products and programs to reach articulated outcomes.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 1256.

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DSGN 2351, 3 credits

Communication Design: Web Design Fundamentals

Students learn to write standards-compliant HTML and CSS and author websites that respond to current devices and browsers. They use contemporary approaches to web typography and graphics. Previous experience with Adobe Photoshop is recommended.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in DSGN 1255.

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DSGN 2353, 3 credits

Interiors and Architecture IV: Site & Context in Architectural Design

This course will explore the role of site and context in the development and design of architectural spaces, interior and exterior, and the impact that the site has on the design intention. Students will begin by learning how to evaluate and document site conditions for specific architectural projects. These projects will then be used to allow students to explore how the built environment relates to its surrounding through formal attributes, in addition to finishes and material choices. Course content will also include considerations around solar patterns, acoustic factors, environmental conditions, and sustainability standards.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in DSGN 1153.

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DSGN 2354, 1 credit

Work Experience

Students secure a two-week work experience to gain valuable insight into professional design environments. They apply skills and experience gained in the program to contribute to design projects with industry professional supervision. Work Experience can take place in design studios, in-house design departments in companies or organizations, or with a design mentor.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in DSGN 2054 and 2155; and a minimum "C" grade in DSGN 2151.

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DSGN 2451, 3 credits

Communication Design: Printing and Publications

Students learn to produce, to industry-standard specifications, digital files that incorporate type, photographs, and graphics for professional printing. They explore printing stages, including prepress requirements, preflighting digital files, proofing methods, and evaluation of contract proofs.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Design Formation.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in DSGN 2151; and a minimum "C-" grade in DSGN 2155.

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GEOL 1107, 3 credits

Dynamic Earth

Formerly GEOL 1110

This course provides an introduction to physical geology. Topics include the origin and structure of the earth, the nature of rocks and minerals, plate tectonics, deformation of the Earth's crust, seismic activity, geomorphic processes, and the development of landforms. This is a laboratory science course. Labs will emphasize rock and mineral identification techniques.

Students will receive credit for only one of GEOL 1107 or 1110.

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GERO 1816, 1 credit

Gerontology Practicum I

Students have the opportunity to spend four hours a week in a practicum placement at a designated social service community agency under the supervision of an agency field supervisor. Through this experience, students develop and practise professional behaviours and learn how particular agencies meet the needs of older adults. Graded S/U.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Gerontology and Certificate in Social Service Worker (Gerontology).

Corequisite(s): GERO 1100.

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GERO 1916, 3 credits

Gerontology Practicum II

Students experience a structured, supervised placement in a community organization (two days a week). Students integrate classroom and seminar learning with practical experience, applying specialized knowledge, theory, and ethics within gerontology service settings while developing professional practice skills. In the field placements, students work with older adults, family members, community groups, and professionals. Graded S/U.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Gerontology and Certificate in Social Service Worker (Gerontology).

Prerequisite(s): An "S" grade in GERO 1816.

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GERO 2016, 4 credits

Gerontology Practicum III

Students experience a structured, supervised placement in a community organization (one day a week). Students integrate classroom and seminar learning with practical experience, applying specialized knowledge, theory, and ethics within gerontology service settings while developing professional practice skills. Students work with older adults, family members, community groups, and professionals. During this field placement students complete a literature review or agency determined project by locating, interpreting, and evaluating appropriate academic research and literature related to the service delivery context of their agency or organization. Graded S/U.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Gerontology.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in all of the following: GERO 1100, 1115, 1215, and 1300; and an "S" grade in GERO 1816 and 1916; or permission of the program coordinator.

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LIBR 2516, 3 credits

Readers' Advisory Services

This course acquaints students with reading interests of adults in preparation for readers’ advisory (RA) work with adults. Skills related to readers’ advisory service in public and other library settings are introduced and practiced, and the basic tenets of readers’ advisory are reinforced throughout the course. Students learn how to interview readers to determine their reading interests and will practice describing books objectively. In addition, students investigate and use RA tools that are available for making reading and viewing recommendations. Issues of representation, inclusivity, diversity, and tolerance towards all readers and reading interests are explored.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Library & Information Technology, Diploma in Library & Information Technology (Flex Participation Option), and Diploma in Library & Information Technology (BBA Transfer Option).

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THEA 1150, 3 credits

CAD for Theatre Production

In this hands-on course, students are introduced to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) using Vectorworks software. Through exercises and projects, students learn effective techniques and applications of 2D drafting and 3D digital modeling, including drawing and modeling tools, file management and organization, workflow, and conventions as they relate to drafting and orthographic projection views, to make plans and documentation packages.

Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

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THEA 1250, 3 credits

Set Design I

In this hands-on course, students are introduced to the process of theatrical and stage design. Through a combination of presentations, exercises, and projects, students learn to employ strategies to effectively analyze and develop design ideas for the stage from conception to presentation.

Priority registration in this course is offered to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

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THEA 2160, 6 credits

Production Skills Foundation

Formerly THEA 2150

Students are introduced to conceptual and technical skills essential to the production theatre practice. Students engage in directed studies developing production skills while working as part of backstage crews of Studio 58 productions.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in all of the following: THEA 1110, 1120, 1130, and 1140.

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THEA 2260, 9 credits

Production Skills Development

Formerly THEA 2250

Students are introduced to the theatrical design disciplines of costume, props, lighting, sound, and projection design, as well as furthering their studies of production theatre practice. Through a directed studies component, students develop production skills while working as part of backstage crews of Studio 58 productions.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B-" grade in THEA 2160.

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THEA 2360, 15 credits

Production Skills Practice

Formerly THEA 2300

Students are introduced to stage management while advancing their studies in the theatrical design disciplines of costume, props, lighting, sound and projection, and production theatre practice. Through directed studies, students further develop production skills while working as part of backstage crews of Studio 58 productions.

Students will receive credit for only one of THEA 2300 or 2360.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B-" grade in THEA 2260.

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THEA 3460, 15 credits

Production Skills Advanced Practice I

In advanced applied studies, students are guided through the process of assuming a leadership role in the production team (stage management and/or design team), as well as furthering their studies in production theatre practice through work placement opportunities.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B-" grade in THEA 2360.

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THEA 3560, 15 credits

Production Skills Advanced Practice II

Furthering their advanced applied studies, students are guided through the process of assuming a leadership role in the production team (stage management and/or design team), as well as furthering their studies of production theatre practice through work placement opportunities.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Diploma in Theatre Arts at Studio 58 (Theatre Production).

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "B-" grade in THEA 2460.

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