New Courses (Effective 202010):

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AHIS 1120, 3 credits

Introduction to Museum and Curatorial Studies

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Galleries and museums are complex social and cultural institutions that collect, display, and interpret objects for-and with-diverse audiences. In this course, students explore the history, theory, and practice of curating in art, history, anthropology, and interdisciplinary galleries and museums. Students focus on the history of museum practices and the influences of multiple perspectives in facilitating learning experiences within museums and communities. Students also engage in hands-on curatorial projects. Classes are complemented by field trips to museums, galleries, and heritage sites.  

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ECED 1102, 3 credits

Child Growth and Development I

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students are introduced to theories and research related to child growth and development. The origins of child growth and development research are explored. Students examine the overall progression of how children change and develop from birth to 3 years of age. This course focused on child development in the following areas: physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and language.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education.

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ECED 1112, 3 credits

Exploring the Environment I

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and implement play-based learning experiences throughout the early learning curriculum. Students begin to utilize a variety of observation techniques in order to interpret children’s interest and abilities and offer play-based learning experiences based on those observations and interpretations. Students need access to learning and care programs to successfully complete this course.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Diploma in Early Childhood Education.

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ECED 1202, 3 credits

Child Growth and Development II

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Building on material covered in ECED 1102: Child Growth and Development I, students explore current research and theories in child growth and development. Students examine the overall progression of how children change and develop from 36 months to five years of age. Students focus on child development in the following areas: physical, cognitive, social and emotional, and language within the context of a life-span developmental perspective.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ECED 1102.

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ECED 1212, 3 credits

Exploring the Environment II

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Building on material covered in ECED 1112: Exploring the Environment l, students further develop the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and implement play-based learning experiences throughout the curriculum. Students apply their knowledge, and refine their skill and ability to use a variety of observation techniques to interpret children’s interests and abilities. Students design and offer play-based learning experiences based on those observations and interpretations. Students will need access to early learning and care programs in order to successfully complete this course. 

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Diploma in Early Childhood Education.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C-" grade in ECED 1112.

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FMGT 2485, 3 credits

Investment Strategies

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students examine a broad range of investment management principles including investment research, planning, and analysis to improve decision-making and overall portfolio performance. Students analyze investment theory and process, financial markets and institutions, financial assets and their related valuations, and mutual funds.

Prerequisite(s):A minimum "C" grade in FMGT 1215 or 2293.

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LAMS 2205, 3 credits

Latin American Writers Resist

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Latin American literature is a powerful force for social change. In this course, students compare, contrast, and analyze a variety of literature in translation from a wide range of Latin American countries, reflecting on the impact of context (the country, time period, social, cultural, political, and economic situations) on these texts. They explore how writers use literature to confront injustice related to gender, class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, environment, land ownership, indigenous struggles, migration, and asylum, and apply this to a range of global issues outside Latin America.

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PSYC 2325, 3 credits

Personality

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Through the study of classical personality theories and cutting-edge research, students learn how biological, psychological, and sociocultural forces create individual differences in the human personality. Along the way, via personality inventories and self-reflection exercises, students gain an in-depth understanding of their own personalities and awareness of the potential consequences their personalities have for various well-being, interpersonal and mental health outcomes. Students also learn about stability and change in personality across situations and the lifespan; strategies for adjustment, resilience, and self-improvement; and contentious research into sex, gender, and personality.  

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2327, 3 credits

The Psychology of Human Animal Relationships

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students in this course undertake a critical analysis of the psychological dynamic between human and non-human animals. They explore what psychological science has discovered about animal consciousness, cognition, language, intelligence, emotion, motivation, and morality. As students form a grounding in how these capacities evolved in non-human animals, they will examine where we, as human animals, position ourselves in their world, and where non-human animals might position themselves in ours. Students delve into the scientific literature on the impact of animals on human health, animal and human attachment, the use of animals in psychological science, animal assisted therapy, and animal abuse and its association with other forms of violent behaviour directed at humans.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum  "C-" grade in PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2329, 3 credits

Forensic Psychology

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Students will examine the ways in which the fields of psychology and law intersect. Topics may include psychology and law enforcement, the role of psychological experts in court, eyewitness testimony, victimology, psychological assessment, and treatment of various forensic populations (e.g., youth offenders, violent and sexual offenders, criminal psychopaths etc.). Through selected topic areas, students explore the contribution of psychological theory, concepts, and principles to understanding human behaviour that occurs in the legal context. Students focus on how psychological research and clinical expertise inform current practice pertaining to both criminal and civil legal issues.

College credit will be given for only one of the following courses: PSYC 1195: Special Topics I - Psychology and the Law (offered in fall 2019) or PSYC 2329.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both PSYC 1115 and 1215.

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PSYC 2333, 3 credits

Applied Behavioural Neuroscience

New Course as of Spring Semester 2020

Applied behavioural neuroscience draws upon empirical evidence from philosophy, psychology, biology, chemistry, and physics to better understand the biological basis of behaviour. Students explore a number of topics to better appreciate human diversity. Topics may include how people process taste and smells, how hormones regulate behaviour, and how psychoactive drugs interact with the nervous system. Students also learn about neuroimaging and how it is used to study topics such as the biological bases of learning and mental health. Students participate in hands-on lab activities and learn about research design and statistics that are commonly implemented in neuroscience research.

Prerequisite(s): A minimum "C+" grade in both PSYC 1115 and 1215.