Program Curriculum

Program Curriculum

The Journalism Program offers professional training to students planning to become practising journalists and introduces them to important aspects of the communications industry. Its goal is to provide students with the skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level jobs in journalism, whether in print, broadcasting or online. The program emphasizes strong writing skills, the necessary groundwork for careers in all journalism sectors.

Diploma Program

The diploma program aims to provide high school graduates with a combination of journalism courses and an introduction to liberal arts courses relevant to the journalist’s work. The first year provides introductory and basic skills courses; the second year focuses on advanced journalism practices. Between years, students are encouraged to seek summer employment with community media outlets to gain experience. A Diploma in Journalism is awarded for successful completion of the four-term diploma stream.

Certificate Program

 
The certificate program is designed to give students with an appropriate university degree the opportunity to take specialized journalism training at high speed. This intensive, skills-oriented experience is designed to build on the student’s academic background, providing the student with the tools to work as a well-informed professional journalist. The first semester focuses on introductory and basic skills courses; the second semester on advanced journalism practices. A Certificate in Journalism is awarded for successful completion of the two-term certificate stream.

Curriculum

In both streams, students are introduced to basic journalism skills and the importance of journalism to the community. Focus is on news writing, journalism history, page design and layout, reporting for radio, and photojournalism. Students will also experience the life of a reporter by researching, conducting interviews, and writing stories for the program’s weekly newspaper, The Voice, which is circulated on campus and in the surrounding community.  Students also write stories, produce podcasts, edit video and post blogs to the Voice Online.

The second part of the program provides students with courses in advanced reporting techniques, specialty reporting, and television reporting. Students spend considerable time on off-campus assignments focusing on civic issues and the courts.

Senior students gain experience as editors of The Voice. This is an intensive, hands-on experience in producing a newspaper, including story planning, editing, page design, photo editing, pagination, as well as assigning, producing and editing multimedia stories for the web.  At this point, advanced students may have the opportunity to pursue special projects involving broadcasting, digital journalism, corporate communications, or magazine production.

Internships

As part of their curriculum, diploma students complete five-week internships at the media outlets of their choice:  community papers, dailies, radio, television, newspapers, websites, magazines, or corporate communications. Certificate stream students have no fieldwork requirements though the department frequently assists students to arrange internships to be completed after graduation.

Professional contacts

Throughout the program, students are connected to working reporters and editors who participate as guest lecturers, lead seminars or act as mentors.  An advisory committee representing a variety of media outlets provides advice on current trends and issues to ensure the department's curriculum is up-to-date and relevant.  As well, Langara grads constitute an effective network in the industry across Canada and around the world, tipping off recent grads to job opportunities and providing support and advice to those who follow in their footsteps.  See what can happen on Langara Journalism's Facebook page.

Grading

The Journalism Department requires that its students meet the following criteria in order to remain in and complete the program. A student must obtain a grade of no less than C- in all journalism and support courses. Any student who receives a D or an F, or withdraws from any course, will not be allowed to enrol in the next semester, except with permission of the department.

Successful completion of all courses in any term is a prerequisite to continuing to the next term. A student who receives a D or an F, or withdraws from any journalism or support course, will be allowed to progress in the program only after successfully repeating the failed or incomplete course or courses.



Diploma students must obtain credit in all of the Journalism and academic courses below. It is permissible to take the academic courses before enrolling in the Journalism Program.

CURRICULUM

TERM ONE

Courses Credits
All of
JOUR 1120 Journalism Research
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A practical introduction to how to find information on people, government and corporations. Topics include library research, on-line databases, freedom of information laws and interviewing techniques.

More Information »

JOUR 1128 Fundamentals of Reporting
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 1.0

Writing basic news stories and features; interviewing news sources; researching and reporting a variety of general-assignment news stories.

More Information »

JOUR 1188 Media and Society I
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of the importance of journalism in western society and the Anglo-American tradition of press freedom, with special attention to landmark events in Canada, Britain and the United States.

More Information »

ECON 1119 Canadian Domestic and International Issues
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course uses economic principles to describe and analyse contemporary domestic and international issues confronting the Canadian economy.

More Information »

POLI 1119 Canadian Politics and Government
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This introductory course deals with the origins and structure of Canadian government and analyses the social and political forces which shape our current political system. Topics include Parliament, the PM and Cabinet, political parties, Quebec nationalism, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

More Information »

One of
ENGL 1127 Essay Writing and Short Prose Selections
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course emphasizes the principles of composition through the study and writing of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. As a secondary aim, it encourages an appreciation of modern literature through a study of the short story.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1126, 1127, and 1128.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 4 (or LET 3 with strong recommendation of concurrent registration in ENGL 1121) or LPI equivalent; a minimum 80% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12; or a minimum "C" in ENGL 1120; or an "S" in one of ENGL 1107, 1108, or 1110.

More Information »

ENGL 1128 Short Prose Selections and Composition
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

ENGL 1128 introduces students to the principles of composition through the study of various kinds of essays, including the research essay. It also emphasizes an appreciation of modern prose writing through the study of both short stories and essays. Most writing assignments are related to the literature studied. Because this course is designed for students with superior writing skills, more intensive reading will be required.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1127 or 1128.

Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

Prerequisite(s): One of LET 5 (or LPI equivalent) or a minimum 85% in one of BC English 12 or BC English Literature 12 or BC English First Peoples 12.

More Information »

17 Credits

TERM TWO

Courses Credits
All of
JOUR 1140 Copy Editing
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students will be introduced to basic copy editing skills, focusing on newspaper style. Major topics include role of the copy editor, news values, language skills, copy editing techniques, Canadian Press style, and headline and caption writing. Many of the editing assignments will be done in lab under deadline pressure.

More Information »

JOUR 1168 Photo Journalism
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

The students develop skills and concepts required to produce professional photographic news reports and photo essays, including combining words, still or multiple images and designs to tell a story. They learn the fundamentals of multimedia photojournalism for the Internet.

More Information »

JOUR 1177 Newspaper Design and Layout
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students learn the principles of design using industry standard software that is applicable to newspapers and to online news sites. They create pages that attract the reader's interest through effective use of photos and design elements, while conveying information quickly and clearly.

More Information »

JOUR 1178 Multi-Media Production I
5

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 11.0

Students will write news and feature stories, take photos, and create news videos for multi-media platforms, including the program's weekly newspaper, The Voice, and its website.

More Information »

JOUR 1244 Introduction to Online Journalism
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Students will learn about major new trends in online journalism and become fluent in a variety of digital media forms. Topics include writing for the web, social media for journalists, blogging and multimedia production techniques.

Registration in this course is restricted to students admitted to the Journalism program.

Pre-requisite(s): JOUR 1120, 1128, and 1188

More Information »

JOUR 1298 Broadcasting I
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

An introduction to broadcast journalism, with emphasis on the skills needed for radio. Topics include writing for the spoken word, on-air voice delivery, the selection of interview clips, and the line-up of newscasts. Students produce, voice, and edit their stories on audio tape.

More Information »

One of
ENGL 1129 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Drama
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to a sampling of modern drama. Writing assignments are related to the literary works studied.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128.

More Information »

ENGL 1130 Modern Novel, Poetry, and Film
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

This course introduces students to the modern novel, to a selection of poems, mainly from the twentieth century, and to the dramatic elements and narrative techniques of modern film. Writing assignments are related to the works studied. A feature film series accompanies the course, in addition to class hours.

Students will receive credit for only one of ENGL 1129 or 1130.

Prerequisite(s): One of ENGL 1100, 1127, or 1128. Students intending to pursue studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia should choose ENGL 1100.

More Information »

One of
GEOG 1150 Geography of British Columbia
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

(Former Title: British Columbia: Resources and Regional Development)

British Columbia is a richly endowed and diverse province. In this course the province's human and physical geography is explored. Topics covered include regions, climate, natural hazards, geomorphology, biogeography, history, resource development, Aboriginal issues, cultural diversity, and urbanization. Students will actively engage in discussions of contemporary issues, problems, and solutions. This course is of interest to students who would like to have a better understanding of British Columbia and its role within Canada and the world.

More Information »

HIST 1126 Modern Canada
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

The social, political, and economic growth of Canada since Confederation. This course will consider such topics as 19th century economic policy, the relationship between First Nations and the emerging Canadian state, the place of Quebec in Canada, women's historical experience, the impact of industrialization, and Canada's relationship to both Britain and the United States. History 1126 can be taken before or after History 1116 (Early Canada) or concurrently.

More Information »

23 Credits

TERM THREE

Courses Credits
All of
JOUR 2228 Journalism Law
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of the legal system as it pertains to journalism. An introduction to covering the courts and to the laws that affect the working journalist, including libel, contempt of court, freedom of information and privacy.

More Information »

JOUR 2278 Multi-Media Production II
6

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 14.0

As editors, students will assign stories, photos and videos, copy edit and do layout and design for multi-media platforms, including the program's weekly newspaper, The Voice, and its website.

More Information »

JOUR 2328 Journalism Ethics
1

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of the role and responsibility of the news media, including credibility, conflict of interest, taste, press councils and accountability.

More Information »

JOUR 2380 Civic Reporting
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Formerly JOUR 2378

Students will use advanced journalism techniques, including social media, data visualization, mutli-platform presentation, and investigation, to develop story proposals and coverage of defined municipal beat. At the same time, they will learn about the roles and responsibilities of local government agencies.

Prerequisite(s): JOUR 1120, 1128, 1178, and 1188.

More Information »

JOUR 2398 Broadcasting II
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

Designed to teach the basic skills of television reporting. Topics include telling a story with pictures, on-air performance, voice overs, writing to pictures, and the selection of interview clips. Students produce, shoot, and edit their stories on video tape.

More Information »

POLI 2229 Introduction to Urban Politics
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

A general introduction to Canadian local politics and government, with specific focus on Vancouver and the British Columbia case. Topics will include electoral systems, party politics, local pressure groups, the role of bureaucracy, regional government and the relationship of cities to provincial and federal administrations.

Prerequisite(s): One of POLI 1100, 1119, or 2250 (formerly 1150); or APPL 1140; or APPL 1130 and 1210.

More Information »

One of
JOUR 2418 Corporate Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 4.0 | Lab: 0.0

Promotional and marketing writing, including audio-visual script-writing, the media kit and employee publications. For students interested in the world of public relations and corporate communications.

(Option, offered if numbers warrant)

More Information »

JOUR 2458 Magazine Feature Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

Writing for magazines: generating and selling ideas; freelancing; understanding the industry. In-depth and profile writing.

More Information »

21 Credits

TERM FOUR

Courses Credits
All of
JOUR 2358 Daily Paper Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 3.0 | Lab: 1.0

A laboratory for writing to daily paper standards under deadline pressure.

More Information »

JOUR 2430 Magazine Production
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Working as a team, students will edit and produce the annual Langara Journalism Review, focusing on contemporary issues in journalism. Students will learn about editorial planning, budgeting, advertising, circulation, production and printing. This course also looks at the magazine industry in Canada.

More Information »

JOUR 2488 Media and Society II
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of contemporary media models and issues, ranging from community media to world media systems; critical issues facing today's journalist; future roles and trends in communication systems.

More Information »

One of
JOUR 2459 Fieldwork/Print
6

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 16.0

Internship in the print media for five consecutive weeks in the fourth term. Graded S/U.

(Option for JOUR 2469)

More Information »

JOUR 2469 Fieldwork/Broadcast
6

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 16.0

Internship in the broadcast media for five consecutive weeks in the fourth term. Graded S/U.

(Option for JOUR 2459)

More Information »

One of
JOUR 2467 Special Print Project
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 5.0

Working under faculty supervision, students will successfully complete a substantial piece of public affairs journalism suitable for publication in a newspaper or magazine. Project requires faculty approval.

(Option for JOUR 2468)

More Information »

JOUR 2468 Special Broadcast Project
3

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 5.0

Working under faculty supervision, students will successfully complete a substantial piece of public affairs journalism suitable for radio or television. Project requires faculty approval.

(Option for JOUR 2467)

Prerequisite(s): JOUR 2398

More Information »

17 Credits

Program Option Notes:

Be sure to check the prerequisites for Arts and Science courses that are part of the program.

CURRICULUM

TERM ONE

Courses Credits
All of
JOUR 1120 Journalism Research
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

A practical introduction to how to find information on people, government and corporations. Topics include library research, on-line databases, freedom of information laws and interviewing techniques.

More Information »

JOUR 1128 Fundamentals of Reporting
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 1.0

Writing basic news stories and features; interviewing news sources; researching and reporting a variety of general-assignment news stories.

More Information »

JOUR 1140 Copy Editing
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students will be introduced to basic copy editing skills, focusing on newspaper style. Major topics include role of the copy editor, news values, language skills, copy editing techniques, Canadian Press style, and headline and caption writing. Many of the editing assignments will be done in lab under deadline pressure.

More Information »

JOUR 1168 Photo Journalism
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

The students develop skills and concepts required to produce professional photographic news reports and photo essays, including combining words, still or multiple images and designs to tell a story. They learn the fundamentals of multimedia photojournalism for the Internet.

More Information »

JOUR 1177 Newspaper Design and Layout
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 2.0

Students learn the principles of design using industry standard software that is applicable to newspapers and to online news sites. They create pages that attract the reader's interest through effective use of photos and design elements, while conveying information quickly and clearly.

More Information »

JOUR 1178 Multi-Media Production I
5

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 11.0

Students will write news and feature stories, take photos, and create news videos for multi-media platforms, including the program's weekly newspaper, The Voice, and its website.

More Information »

JOUR 1188 Media and Society I
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of the importance of journalism in western society and the Anglo-American tradition of press freedom, with special attention to landmark events in Canada, Britain and the United States.

More Information »

JOUR 1298 Broadcasting I
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 1.0

An introduction to broadcast journalism, with emphasis on the skills needed for radio. Topics include writing for the spoken word, on-air voice delivery, the selection of interview clips, and the line-up of newscasts. Students produce, voice, and edit their stories on audio tape.

More Information »

23 Credits

TERM TWO

Courses Credits
All of
JOUR 2228 Journalism Law
2

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of the legal system as it pertains to journalism. An introduction to covering the courts and to the laws that affect the working journalist, including libel, contempt of court, freedom of information and privacy.

More Information »

JOUR 2278 Multi-Media Production II
6

Lecture Hours: 0.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 14.0

As editors, students will assign stories, photos and videos, copy edit and do layout and design for multi-media platforms, including the program's weekly newspaper, The Voice, and its website.

More Information »

JOUR 2328 Journalism Ethics
1

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 1.0 | Lab: 0.0

An examination of the role and responsibility of the news media, including credibility, conflict of interest, taste, press councils and accountability.

More Information »

JOUR 2358 Daily Paper Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 3.0 | Lab: 1.0

A laboratory for writing to daily paper standards under deadline pressure.

More Information »

JOUR 2380 Civic Reporting
3

Lecture Hours: 3.0 | Seminar: 0.0 | Lab: 0.0

Formerly JOUR 2378

Students will use advanced journalism techniques, including social media, data visualization, mutli-platform presentation, and investigation, to develop story proposals and coverage of defined municipal beat. At the same time, they will learn about the roles and responsibilities of local government agencies.

Prerequisite(s): JOUR 1120, 1128, 1178, and 1188.

More Information »

JOUR 2398 Broadcasting II
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

Designed to teach the basic skills of television reporting. Topics include telling a story with pictures, on-air performance, voice overs, writing to pictures, and the selection of interview clips. Students produce, shoot, and edit their stories on video tape.

More Information »

One of
JOUR 2418 Corporate Communications
3

Lecture Hours: 1.0 | Seminar: 4.0 | Lab: 0.0

Promotional and marketing writing, including audio-visual script-writing, the media kit and employee publications. For students interested in the world of public relations and corporate communications.

(Option, offered if numbers warrant)

More Information »

JOUR 2458 Magazine Feature Writing
3

Lecture Hours: 2.0 | Seminar: 2.0 | Lab: 0.0

Writing for magazines: generating and selling ideas; freelancing; understanding the industry. In-depth and profile writing.

More Information »

21 Credits